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Posts Tagged: UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology

When Bruce Hammock's Cockroaches Achieved Stardom

A Madagascar hissing cockroach from the Bohart Museum of Entomology, UC Davis. This is similar to what Bruce Hammock was rearing for a research project. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

If you're meandering around the UC Riverside campus and see a cockroach, it might have a connection to UC Davis distinguished professor Bruce...

A Madagascar hissing cockroach from the Bohart Museum of Entomology, UC Davis. This is similar to what Bruce Hammock was rearing for a research project. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A Madagascar hissing cockroach from the Bohart Museum of Entomology, UC Davis. This is similar to what Bruce Hammock was rearing for a research project. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Madagascar hissing cockroach from the Bohart Museum of Entomology, UC Davis. This is similar to what Bruce Hammock was rearing for a research project. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-up of a Madagascar hissing cockroach, aka
Close-up of a Madagascar hissing cockroach, aka "hisser," from the Bohart Museum of Entomology, UC Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-up of a Madagascar hissing cockroach, aka "hisser," from the Bohart Museum of Entomology, UC Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis distinguished professor Bruce Hammock in his Briggs Hall office. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
UC Davis distinguished professor Bruce Hammock in his Briggs Hall office. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis distinguished professor Bruce Hammock in his Briggs Hall office. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, February 23, 2021 at 4:38 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Innovation

Jessica Kansman: 'To Be an Aphid in a Cruel World'

A winged aphid, photo courtesy of Jessica Kansman, Pennsylvania State University.

Lady beetles, aka ladybugs, gobble up aphids like kids gobble up popcorn and we all cheer loudly.  Take that, you aphids! That'll...

A winged aphid, photo courtesy of Jessica Kansman, Pennsylvania State University.
A winged aphid, photo courtesy of Jessica Kansman, Pennsylvania State University.

A winged aphid, photo courtesy of Jessica Kansman, Pennsylvania State University.

An aphid rides the back of a lady beetle. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
An aphid rides the back of a lady beetle. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

An aphid rides the back of a lady beetle. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, February 19, 2021 at 3:54 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Environment, Innovation, Natural Resources, Pest Management, Yard & Garden

Learn About the Diversity of Bees in This UC Davis Biodiversity Museum Month Program

A honey bee in flight, packing red pollen from a rock purslane. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Talk about diverse. The bee world exemplifies diversity and the UC Davis Biodiversity Museum Month, being celebrated throughout the month of...

A honey bee in flight, packing red pollen from a rock purslane. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A honey bee in flight, packing red pollen from a rock purslane. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee in flight, packing red pollen from a rock purslane. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A female Valley carpenter bee, Xylocopa sonorina, formerly known as Xylocopa varipuncta. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A female Valley carpenter bee, Xylocopa sonorina, formerly known as Xylocopa varipuncta. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A female Valley carpenter bee, Xylocopa sonorina, formerly known as Xylocopa varipuncta. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A male Valley carpenter bee,  Xylocopa sonorina, which the late Robbin Thorp of UC Davis called
A male Valley carpenter bee, Xylocopa sonorina, which the late Robbin Thorp of UC Davis called "the teddy bear bee." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A male Valley carpenter bee, Xylocopa sonorina, which the late Robbin Thorp of UC Davis called "the teddy bear bee." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, foraging on the tower of jewels, Echium wildpretii. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, foraging on the tower of jewels, Echium wildpretii. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, foraging on the tower of jewels, Echium wildpretii. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A male leafcutter bee, Megachile spp., foraging on rock purslane. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A male leafcutter bee, Megachile spp., foraging on rock purslane. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A male leafcutter bee, Megachile spp., foraging on rock purslane. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Male longhorned bees, Melissodes agilis, asleep on a Tithonia blossom. Females return to their nest at night; males cluster outside. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Male longhorned bees, Melissodes agilis, asleep on a Tithonia blossom. Females return to their nest at night; males cluster outside. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Male longhorned bees, Melissodes agilis, asleep on a Tithonia blossom. Females return to their nest at night; males cluster outside. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A male sweat bee, Agapostemon texanus, on a purple coneflower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A male sweat bee, Agapostemon texanus, on a purple coneflower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A male sweat bee, Agapostemon texanus, on a purple coneflower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A female leafcutting bee, Megachile fidelis, foraging on a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A female leafcutting bee, Megachile fidelis, foraging on a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A female leafcutting bee, Megachile fidelis, foraging on a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, February 16, 2021 at 3:37 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Economic Development, Environment, Family, Food, Innovation, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

Murder Hornets: Murder in the First Degree?

The Asian giant hornet, which the news media named

Want to learn about "murder hornets?" Entomologists cringe every time someone substitutes the moniker, "murder hornet," for the Asian giant...

The Asian giant hornet, which the news media named
The Asian giant hornet, which the news media named "murder hornet." (Photo courtesy of the Washington State Department of Agriculture)

The Asian giant hornet, which the news media named "murder hornet." (Photo courtesy of the Washington State Department of Agriculture)

Posted on Monday, February 15, 2021 at 5:44 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Environment, Natural Resources, Pest Management

The Science of Nematodes, Butterflies, Millipedes and Arachnids

Nematologist Steve Nadler, professor and chair of the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology, presenting a video on nematology. (Screen shot)

Do you know what a nematode is? That's a question that nematologists are frequently asked. Well, just in time for the UC Davis Biodiversity Museum...

Nematologist Steve Nadler, professor and chair of the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology, presenting a video on nematology. (Screen shot)
Nematologist Steve Nadler, professor and chair of the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology, presenting a video on nematology. (Screen shot)

Nematologist Steve Nadler, professor and chair of the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology, presenting a video on nematology. (Screen shot)

UC Davis entomology professor Diane Ullman offers a virtual tour of the Bohart Museum of Entomology's Lepidoptera collection in this video. (Screen shot)
UC Davis entomology professor Diane Ullman offers a virtual tour of the Bohart Museum of Entomology's Lepidoptera collection in this video. (Screen shot)

UC Davis entomology professor Diane Ullman offers a virtual tour of the Bohart Museum of Entomology's Lepidoptera collection in this video. (Screen shot)

Senior museum scientist Steve Heydon of the Bohart Museum of Entomology, gives an overview of how the museum collects, preserves and identifies some of its nearly 8 million insects. (Screen shot)
Senior museum scientist Steve Heydon of the Bohart Museum of Entomology, gives an overview of how the museum collects, preserves and identifies some of its nearly 8 million insects. (Screen shot)

Senior museum scientist Steve Heydon of the Bohart Museum of Entomology, gives an overview of how the museum collects, preserves and identifies some of its nearly 8 million insects. (Screen shot)

Xavier Zahnle, a doctoral student in the Jason Bond lab, talks about common millipedes in the Sacramento-San Francisco region in this video. (Screen shot)
Xavier Zahnle, a doctoral student in the Jason Bond lab, talks about common millipedes in the Sacramento-San Francisco region in this video. (Screen shot)

Xavier Zahnle, a doctoral student in the Jason Bond lab, talks about common millipedes in the Sacramento-San Francisco region in this video. (Screen shot)

Entomologist Jeff Smith, who curates the Lepidoptera collection, Bohart Museum of Entomology, explains how to pin and spread butterfly and moths for display. (Screen shot)
Entomologist Jeff Smith, who curates the Lepidoptera collection, Bohart Museum of Entomology, explains how to pin and spread butterfly and moths for display. (Screen shot)

Entomologist Jeff Smith, who curates the Lepidoptera collection, Bohart Museum of Entomology, explains how to pin and spread butterfly and moths for display. (Screen shot)

UC Davis doctoral student Lacie Newton of the Jason Bond lab talks about arachnids in her video. (Screen shot)
UC Davis doctoral student Lacie Newton of the Jason Bond lab talks about arachnids in her video. (Screen shot)

UC Davis doctoral student Lacie Newton of the Jason Bond lab talks about arachnids in her video. (Screen shot)

Posted on Thursday, February 11, 2021 at 6:02 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Economic Development, Environment, Innovation, Natural Resources, Pest Management

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