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Posts Tagged: UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology

Bug Love: How Much Do You Know About Insect Courtship and Intimacy?

Gulf Fritillaries (Agraulis vanillae) keeping busy on a Tithonia flower in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It's all about insect courtship rituals and intimacy, or what entomologists sometimes call "insect wedding photography."  The Bay...

Gulf Fritillaries (Agraulis vanillae) keeping busy on a Tithonia flower in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Gulf Fritillaries (Agraulis vanillae) keeping busy on a Tithonia flower in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Gulf Fritillaries (Agraulis vanillae) keeping busy on a Tithonia flower in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Two European wool carder bees (Anthidium manicatum) find one another on a foxglove. This image was taken in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Two European wool carder bees (Anthidium manicatum) find one another on a foxglove. This image was taken in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Two European wool carder bees (Anthidium manicatum) find one another on a foxglove. This image was taken in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Birds do it. Bees do it. So do lady beetles, aka ladybugs. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Birds do it. Bees do it. So do lady beetles, aka ladybugs. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Birds do it. Bees do it. So do lady beetles, aka ladybugs. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Of Ants, Hummingbird Feeders and Feelings

Ants head for food on the UC Davis campus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

How do you keep ants off your hummingbird feeders? That was a question a Bug Squad reader asked: "I was wondering if you had any tips on how to keep...

Ants head for food on the UC Davis campus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Ants head for food on the UC Davis campus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ants head for food on the UC Davis campus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A hummingbird heads for a feeder in Vacaville, Calif. This feeder has no ants. Note: don't use red food coloring in your feeders; many feeders now are of red glass. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A hummingbird heads for a feeder in Vacaville, Calif. This feeder has no ants. Note: don't use red food coloring in your feeders; many feeders now are of red glass. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A hummingbird heads for a feeder in Vacaville, Calif. This feeder has no ants. Note: don't use red food coloring in your feeders; many feeders now are of red glass. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Damsel, But Not in Distress

A female damselfly, identified as a familiar bluet, Enallagma civile, rests on a Tithonia leaf in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It's a damsel, but not in distress. It's a Familiar Bluett, but it's not all that familiar--unless you study Odonata. Lately we've been seeing...

A female damselfly, identified as a familiar bluet, Enallagma civile, rests on a Tithonia leaf in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A female damselfly, identified as a familiar bluet, Enallagma civile, rests on a Tithonia leaf in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A female damselfly, identified as a familiar bluet, Enallagma civile, rests on a Tithonia leaf in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Entomologists call this a
Entomologists call this a "two-fer" photo: two insects in the same photo. While one damselfly claims a leaf, another circles above. These are the familiar bluett, (Enallagma civile), according to Greg Kareofelas, an associate at the Bohart Museum of Entomology, UC Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Entomologists call this a "two-fer" photo: two insects in the same photo. While one damselfly claims a leaf, another circles above. These are the familiar bluett, (Enallagma civile), according to Greg Kareofelas, an associate at the Bohart Museum of Entomology, UC Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Bruce Hammock: UC Davis Distinguished Professor Extraordinaire

UC Davis distinguished professor Bruce Hammock

Don't let that photo fool you. Yes, that's UC Davis distinguished professor Bruce Hammock "resting" in a hammock on the UC Davis...

UC Davis distinguished professor Bruce Hammock
UC Davis distinguished professor Bruce Hammock "rests" in a hammock on the UC Davis campus. The occasion: the Hammock lab scientists were walking across campus (before the coronoavirus pandemic precautions). (Photo by Cindy McReynolds)

UC Davis distinguished professor Bruce Hammock "rests" in a hammock on the UC Davis campus. The occasion: the Hammock lab scientists were walking across campus (before the coronoavirus pandemic precautions). (Photo by Cindy McReynolds)

UC Davis distinguished professor Bruce Hammock in his Briggs Hall office. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
UC Davis distinguished professor Bruce Hammock in his Briggs Hall office. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis distinguished professor Bruce Hammock in his Briggs Hall office. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

How a Student's 'A' Term Paper Went on to Win a Campuswide Competition

UC Davis fourth-year student Jessica Macaluso stands next to artist Robert Arneson's egghead sculpture in front of Mrak Hall. She will receive her bachelor's degree in psychology this fall.

This is a story about how a student's "A" term paper in an entomology professor's went on to win a campuswide competition. When UC Davis...

UC Davis fourth-year student Jessica Macaluso stands next to artist Robert Arneson's egghead sculpture in front of Mrak Hall. She will receive her bachelor's degree in psychology this fall.
UC Davis fourth-year student Jessica Macaluso stands next to artist Robert Arneson's egghead sculpture in front of Mrak Hall. She will receive her bachelor's degree in psychology this fall.

UC Davis fourth-year student Jessica Macaluso stands next to artist Robert Arneson's egghead sculpture in front of Mrak Hall. She will receive her bachelor's degree in psychology this fall.

Vincent Pan, who is doing research in the lab of ecologist Rick Karban, UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology, won second place in the science, engineering and mathematics category of the Norma J. Lang Prize for Undergraduate Information Research.
Vincent Pan, who is doing research in the lab of ecologist Rick Karban, UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology, won second place in the science, engineering and mathematics category of the Norma J. Lang Prize for Undergraduate Information Research.

Vincent Pan, who is doing research in the lab of ecologist Rick Karban, UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology, won second place in the science, engineering and mathematics category of the Norma J. Lang Prize for Undergraduate Information Research.

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