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Posts Tagged: UC ANR

UC Davis, UC ANR Communicators Win Awards

Kira Olmos, 5, of Winters reacts to her first encounter with a stick insect at a Bohart Museum of Entomology open house. This candid image won a silver award in the ACE competition. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Hats off to the communicators affiliated with the University of California, Davis, and the UC Agriculture and Natural Resources (UC ANR) for their...

Kira Olmos, 5, of Winters reacts to her first encounter with a stick insect at a Bohart Museum of Entomology open house. This candid image won a silver award in the ACE competition. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Kira Olmos, 5, of Winters reacts to her first encounter with a stick insect at a Bohart Museum of Entomology open house. This candid image won a silver award in the ACE competition. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Kira Olmos, 5, of Winters reacts to her first encounter with a stick insect at a Bohart Museum of Entomology open house. This candid image won a silver award in the ACE competition. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A feature story on UC Davis staff academic advisor Elvira Galvan Hack (pictured) won a silver award in the ACE competition. The article, by Kathy Keatley Garvey, traced her success story. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A feature story on UC Davis staff academic advisor Elvira Galvan Hack (pictured) won a silver award in the ACE competition. The article, by Kathy Keatley Garvey, traced her success story. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A feature story on UC Davis staff academic advisor Elvira Galvan Hack (pictured) won a silver award in the ACE competition. The article, by Kathy Keatley Garvey, traced her success story. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Western IPM Center's Steve Elliott won a silver award for his piece on
Western IPM Center's Steve Elliott won a silver award for his piece on "IPM in Yellowstone."

Western IPM Center's Steve Elliott won a silver award for his piece on "IPM in Yellowstone."

Diane Nelson of the UC College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences won a bronze award for her piece on
Diane Nelson of the UC College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences won a bronze award for her piece on "Can Science Save Citrus?"

Diane Nelson of the UC College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences won a bronze award for her piece on "Can Science Save Citrus?"

Posted on Tuesday, June 23, 2020 at 5:00 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Economic Development, Environment, Family, Food, Innovation, Natural Resources

Ag Award Recipient Rachael Freeman Long: A UC Davis Professor Sparked Her Interest in Biocontrol

Rachael Long, UCCE farm advisor, leads a tour of her  family farm in Yolo County in  April of 2015.

Rachael Freeman Long treasures her memories as a graduate student in entomology at the University of California, Davis. She remembers eating fried...

Rachael Long, UCCE farm advisor, leads a tour of her  family farm in Yolo County in  April of 2015.
Rachael Long, UCCE farm advisor, leads a tour of her family farm in Yolo County in April of 2015. "Hedgerows are important for enhancing beneficial insects, including bees and natural enemies, for better biocontrol and crop pollination in adjacent field crops, with measurable economic benefits," she says. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Rachael Long, UCCE farm advisor, leads a tour of her family farm in Yolo County in April of 2015. "Hedgerows are important for enhancing beneficial insects, including bees and natural enemies, for better biocontrol and crop pollination in adjacent field crops, with measurable economic benefits," she says. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, May 17, 2019 at 3:01 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Economic Development, Environment, Innovation, Natural Resources, Pest Management, Yard & Garden

Syrphid Fly in Rock Purslane: When a House Is a Home

A syrphid fly, tucked in the folds of a rock purslane, Calandrinia grandiflora, sips nectar. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

When a house is a home... Take the case of a syrphid fly, aka hover fly or flower fly. It's a cold and windy day, and it's tucked in the folds of a...

A syrphid fly, tucked in the folds of a rock purslane, Calandrinia grandiflora, sips nectar. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A syrphid fly, tucked in the folds of a rock purslane, Calandrinia grandiflora, sips nectar. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A syrphid fly, tucked in the folds of a rock purslane, Calandrinia grandiflora, sips nectar. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The syrphid fly rotates its body to gather more nectar glean more  sun. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The syrphid fly rotates its body to gather more nectar glean more sun. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The syrphid fly rotates its body to gather more nectar glean more sun. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The syprhid is just about ready to take flight. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The syprhid is just about ready to take flight. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The syprhid is just about ready to take flight. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, November 21, 2018 at 11:00 AM
Tags: flower fly (12), hover fly (19), pollinator (6), rock purslane (18), syrphid fly (17), UC ANR (17)
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

Sorry, This Blossom Is Taken

A male Svastra dive-bombs another male on a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia). This image was taken with a fast shutter speed of 1/3200 of a second. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

So here's this male longhorned bee (Svastra) sipping a little nectar from a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia). As the late Mr. Rogers (1928-2003), star...

A male Svastra dive-bombs another male on a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia). This image was taken with a fast shutter speed of 1/3200 of a second. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A male Svastra dive-bombs another male on a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia). This image was taken with a fast shutter speed of 1/3200 of a second. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A male Svastra dive-bombs another male on a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia). This image was taken with a fast shutter speed of 1/3200 of a second. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Following the dive-bombing, the male Svastra kept occupying the blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Following the dive-bombing, the male Svastra kept occupying the blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Following the dive-bombing, the male Svastra kept occupying the blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, July 18, 2018 at 5:00 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

Everybody Loves Bugs, Right? Here Are the Top 25 Bug Blogs in the World

A flameskimmer dragonfly, Libellula saturata, perches on a bamboo stake in Vacaville, Calif. Native to western North America, it belongs to the family Libellulidae. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Everybody loves bugs, right? Well, no, they don't. Some folks scream, smash them, or sprint away from them. Other folks--including yours...

A flameskimmer dragonfly, Libellula saturata, perches on a bamboo stake in Vacaville, Calif. Native to western North America, it belongs to the family Libellulidae. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A flameskimmer dragonfly, Libellula saturata, perches on a bamboo stake in Vacaville, Calif. Native to western North America, it belongs to the family Libellulidae. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A flameskimmer dragonfly, Libellula saturata, perches on a bamboo stake in Vacaville, Calif. Native to western North America, it belongs to the family Libellulidae. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-up of the flameskimmer dragonfly, also called a
Close-up of the flameskimmer dragonfly, also called a "firecracker skimmer." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-up of the flameskimmer dragonfly, also called a "firecracker skimmer." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Flameskimmer in flight as he heads back to his perch, a bamboo stake. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Flameskimmer in flight as he heads back to his perch, a bamboo stake. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Flameskimmer in flight as he heads back to his perch, a bamboo stake. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, June 15, 2018 at 5:04 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Innovation, Pest Management, Yard & Garden

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