Capitol Corridor
University of California
Capitol Corridor

Posts Tagged: Tufts University

How Do Flying Insects Turn on a Dime to Catch Prey?

The first of the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology's

If you've ever watched flameskimmer dragonflies (Libellula saturata) zip-zagging around your yard looking for prey, you've probably marveled at the...

The first of the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology's
The first of the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology's "virtual seminars" featured Mary Salcedo of Virginia Tech talking about "Hydraulics in an Insect Wing." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The first of the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology's "virtual seminars" featured Mary Salcedo of Virginia Tech talking about "Hydraulics in an Insect Wing." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This was the presentation that those watching the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology's
This was the presentation that those watching the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology's "virtual seminar" saw. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This was the presentation that those watching the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology's "virtual seminar" saw. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A question-and-answer session followed Mary Salcedo's presentation. This shows an image of Salcedo (top) and seminar coordinator Rachel Vannette. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A question-and-answer session followed Mary Salcedo's presentation. This shows an image of Salcedo (top) and seminar coordinator Rachel Vannette. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A question-and-answer session followed Mary Salcedo's presentation. This shows an image of Salcedo (top) and seminar coordinator Rachel Vannette. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Elizabeth Crone and the Declining Western Monarchs

Professor Elizabeth Crone delivering a seminar on Western monarchs to the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

"Why Are the Monarch Butterflies Declining in the West?" Professor Elizabeth Crone of Tufts University who researches monarchs (as well as bumble...

Professor Elizabeth Crone delivering a seminar on Western monarchs to the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Professor Elizabeth Crone delivering a seminar on Western monarchs to the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Professor Elizabeth Crone delivering a seminar on Western monarchs to the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Professor Elizabeth Crone chats with scientists following her talk. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Professor Elizabeth Crone chats with scientists following her talk. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Professor Elizabeth Crone chats with scientists following her talk. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

If you see a Western monarch between Feb. 14 and April 22, report it to the Western Monarch Mystery Challenge.
If you see a Western monarch between Feb. 14 and April 22, report it to the Western Monarch Mystery Challenge.

If you see a Western monarch between Feb. 14 and April 22, report it to the Western Monarch Mystery Challenge.

A Troubling Question: Why Are the Monarchs Declining in the West?

A male monarch nectaring on Mexican sunflower (Tithonia) in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The question is troubling: What's going on with the monarch butterfly population in the West? The Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation...

A male monarch nectaring on Mexican sunflower (Tithonia) in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A male monarch nectaring on Mexican sunflower (Tithonia) in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A male monarch nectaring on Mexican sunflower (Tithonia) in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A monarch sipping nectar from its host plant, milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A monarch sipping nectar from its host plant, milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A monarch sipping nectar from its host plant, milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

 
E-mail
 
Webmaster Email: kmchurchill@ucanr.edu