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Posts Tagged: Sweat bee

Dragonfly vs. Bee: Catch of the Day

A red flameskimmer dragonfly (Libellula saturata) with her  prey, a female sweat bee, Halictus ligatus, as identified by Robbin Thorp, distinguished emeritus professor of entomology at UC Davis. The gender of the flamekimmer identified by Kathy Claypool Biggs. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The red flameskimmer dragonfly (Libellula saturata) waits oh-so-patiently atop a bamboo stick at the edge of the pollinator garden. She's in...

A red flameskimmer dragonfly (Libellula saturata) with her  prey, a female sweat bee, Halictus ligatus, as identified by Robbin Thorp, distinguished emeritus professor of entomology at UC Davis. The gender of the flamekimmer identified by Kathy Claypool Biggs. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A red flameskimmer dragonfly (Libellula saturata) with her prey, a female sweat bee, Halictus ligatus, as identified by Robbin Thorp, distinguished emeritus professor of entomology at UC Davis. The gender of the flamekimmer identified by Kathy Claypool Biggs. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A red flameskimmer dragonfly (Libellula saturata) with her prey, a female sweat bee, Halictus ligatus, as identified by Robbin Thorp, distinguished emeritus professor of entomology at UC Davis. The gender of the flamekimmer identified by Kathy Claypool Biggs. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The red flameskimmer dragonfly adjusts her prey, a sweat bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The red flameskimmer dragonfly adjusts her prey, a sweat bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The red flameskimmer dragonfly adjusts her prey, a sweat bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Beneath all of that pollen is a female sweat bee, the prey of this red flameskimmer. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Beneath all of that pollen is a female sweat bee, the prey of this red flameskimmer. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Beneath all of that pollen is a female sweat bee, the prey of this red flameskimmer. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

All gone. The red flameskimmer polishes off the last of the sweat bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
All gone. The red flameskimmer polishes off the last of the sweat bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

All gone. The red flameskimmer polishes off the last of the sweat bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, July 5, 2017 at 4:34 PM

Going Native

Female sweat bee, Halictus rubicundus, foraging Jan. 25 at the Benicia Capitol State Park. Note the tiny wasp, which appears to be a bethylid.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Honey bees aren't the only bees out foraging. We saw our first native bee of the season on Jan. 25 at the Benicia Capitol State Historic...

Female sweat bee, Halictus rubicundus, foraging Jan. 25 at the Benicia Capitol State Park. Note the tiny wasp, which appears to be a bethylid.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Female sweat bee, Halictus rubicundus, foraging Jan. 25 at the Benicia Capitol State Park. Note the tiny wasp, which appears to be a bethylid.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Female sweat bee, Halictus rubicundus, foraging Jan. 25 at the Benicia Capitol State Park. Note the tiny wasp, which appears to be a bethylid.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The head of the sweat bee,Halictus rubicundus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The head of the sweat bee,Halictus rubicundus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The head of the sweat bee,Halictus rubicundus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The female sweat bee, Halictus rubicundus, prepars for take-off. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The female sweat bee, Halictus rubicundus, prepars for take-off. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The female sweat bee, Halictus rubicundus, prepars for take-off. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, February 3, 2016 at 6:15 PM

Bee All You Can Bee

Several years after it was planted, the bee garden looked quite mature. This photo was taken May 22, 2012. This year it is five years old. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Time to celebrate! The UC Davis Departmentof Entomology and Nematology has scheduled a fifth anniversary celebration of  its bee garden on...

Several years after it was planted, the bee garden looked quite mature. This photo was taken May 22, 2012. This year it is five years old. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Several years after it was planted, the bee garden looked quite mature. This photo was taken May 22, 2012. This year it is five years old. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Several years after it was planted, the bee garden looked quite mature. This photo was taken May 22, 2012. This year it is five years old. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, April 28, 2015 at 8:33 PM

'Oh, Is This One of Your Bees?'

What are you looking at? A praying mantis, with a female sweat bee grasped in its spiked forelegs, looks at the camera. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The photo just begs for a caption. The praying mantis, with a female sweat bee grasped in its spiked forelegs, suddenly turns its head to look at...

What are you looking at? A praying mantis, with a female sweat bee grasped in its spiked forelegs, looks at the camera. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
What are you looking at? A praying mantis, with a female sweat bee grasped in its spiked forelegs, looks at the camera. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

What are you looking at? A praying mantis, with a female sweat bee grasped in its spiked forelegs, looks at the camera. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Praying mantis continues to eat the sweat bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Praying mantis continues to eat the sweat bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Praying mantis continues to eat the sweat bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, August 27, 2012 at 10:28 PM
Tags: Allan Jones (13), Gary Zamzow (10), praying mantis (86), Robbin Thorp (234), sweat bee (18)

No Sweat Being Green

Male sweat bee, Agapostemon texanus, on purple coneflower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Beekeepers describe their honey bees as "my girls" or "my beautiful girls." It's a term of endearment. Now take the green metallic sweat bee,...

Male sweat bee, Agapostemon texanus, on purple coneflower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Male sweat bee, Agapostemon texanus, on purple coneflower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Male sweat bee, Agapostemon texanus, on a purple coneflower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Note the metallic green head and thorax of a male sweat bee,  Agapostemon texanus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Note the metallic green head and thorax of a male sweat bee, Agapostemon texanus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Note the metallic green head and thorax of a male sweat bee, Agapostemon texanus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Spotted cucumber beetle (a pest) and male sweat bee,  Agapostemon texanus, sharing a purple coneflower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Spotted cucumber beetle (a pest) and male sweat bee, Agapostemon texanus, sharing a purple coneflower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Spotted cucumber beetle (a pest) and male sweat bee, Agapostemon texanus, sharing a purle coneflower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, August 7, 2012 at 9:46 PM

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