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Posts Tagged: Steve Seybold

UC Davis Doctoral Student Jackson Audley: On the Road to Improve Forest Health

Jackson Audley (left) with major professor Steve Seybold in front of a dying black walnut tree on E St. in Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Forest health promises to take a turn for the better, thanks to forest entomologists like Jackson Audley, a doctoral student at the University of...

Jackson Audley (left) with major professor Steve Seybold in front of a dying black walnut tree on E St. in Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Jackson Audley (left) with major professor Steve Seybold in front of a dying black walnut tree on E St. in Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Jackson Audley (left) with major professor Steve Seybold in front of a dying black walnut tree on E St. in Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Sign of the Times: Why This Black Walnut Tree Is Dying

Forest entomologists Steve Seybold (right) and Jackson Audley stand by a 150-year-old black walnut tree on the 100 block of E Street. It is dying of thousand cankers disease. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

If you've ever walked into the courtyard on the 100 block of E Street in downtown Davis, Calif., you've probably noticed the massive black walnut...

Forest entomologists Steve Seybold (right) and Jackson Audley stand by a 150-year-old black walnut tree on the 100 block of E Street. It is dying of thousand cankers disease. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Forest entomologists Steve Seybold (right) and Jackson Audley stand by a 150-year-old black walnut tree on the 100 block of E Street. It is dying of thousand cankers disease. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Forest entomologists Steve Seybold (right) and Jackson Audley stand by a 150-year-old black walnut tree on the 100 block of E Street. It is dying of thousand cankers disease. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Walnut twig beetles tunnel into branches and trunks of walnut (Juglans) where they create galleries for mating and reproduction. In association with a canker producing fungus, Tthey cause a disease known as thousand cankers disease. This tree is in downtown Davis, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Walnut twig beetles tunnel into branches and trunks of walnut (Juglans) where they create galleries for mating and reproduction. In association with a canker producing fungus, Tthey cause a disease known as thousand cankers disease. This tree is in downtown Davis, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Walnut twig beetles tunnel into branches and trunks of walnut (Juglans) where they create galleries for mating and reproduction. In association with a canker producing fungus, Tthey cause a disease known as thousand cankers disease. This tree is in downtown Davis, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This massive, 150-year-old black walnut tree on the 100 block of E Street, Davis, is dying of thousand cankers disease. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
This massive, 150-year-old black walnut tree on the 100 block of E Street, Davis, is dying of thousand cankers disease. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This massive, 150-year-old black walnut tree on the 100 block of E Street, Davis, is dying of thousand cankers disease. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Meet the 'Extreme Insects' Aug. 19 at Bohart Museum of Entomology Open House

A sand wasp, Bembix americana, foraging on seaside daisies at Bodega Bay. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Talk about extremes! Have you ever thought about how some insects have adapted to fire, ice, acid, hot water, salt and the desert? Have you ever...

This is part of the beetle collection at the Bohart Museum of Entomology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey
This is part of the beetle collection at the Bohart Museum of Entomology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey

This is part of the beetle collection at the Bohart Museum of Entomology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A sand wasp, Bembix americana, foraging on seaside daisies at Bodega Bay. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A sand wasp, Bembix americana, foraging on seaside daisies at Bodega Bay. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A sand wasp, Bembix americana, foraging on seaside daisies at Bodega Bay. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Praying Mantis Named Cupcake Greets Visitors at the Bohart Museum

Cupcake, a Rhombodera megaera praying mantis, perches on the hand of her owner, UC Davis animal biology major, Crystal Homicz. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Most bakers define a "cupcake" as a a small cake designed to serve one person--and one that can be baked in a paper or aluminum cup in a muffin...

Cupcake, a Rhombodera megaera praying mantis, perches on the hand of her owner, UC Davis animal biology major, Crystal Homicz. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Cupcake, a Rhombodera megaera praying mantis, perches on the hand of her owner, UC Davis animal biology major, Crystal Homicz. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Cupcake, a Rhombodera megaera praying mantis, perches on the hand of her owner, UC Davis animal biology major, Crystal Homicz. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis animal biology major Crystal Homicz holds Cupcake, her  Rhombodera megaera praying mantis. It is a native of Asia and the species is one of the largest in the world. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
UC Davis animal biology major Crystal Homicz holds Cupcake, her Rhombodera megaera praying mantis. It is a native of Asia and the species is one of the largest in the world. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis animal biology major Crystal Homicz holds Cupcake, her Rhombodera megaera praying mantis. It is a native of Asia and the species is one of the largest in the world. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Trio of Napa visitors (from left) teacher Marykay Osborn,  Abby Jurgens and Olivia Hamilton, 11, (one of Osborn's students) check out Cupcake, the praying mantis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Trio of Napa visitors (from left) teacher Marykay Osborn, Abby Jurgens and Olivia Hamilton, 11, (one of Osborn's students) check out Cupcake, the praying mantis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Trio of Napa visitors (from left) teacher Marykay Osborn, Abby Jurgens and Olivia Hamilton, 11, (one of Osborn's students) check out Cupcake, the praying mantis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, February 19, 2018 at 4:09 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment Natural Resources

Jackson Audley: A Case Study with the Walnut Twig Beetle

The walnut twig beetle is about the size of a grain of rice. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

So tiny and so destructive. It's about the size of a grain of rice but it's a killer. That's the walnut twig beetle, Pityophthorus juglandis, which...

The walnut twig beetle is about the size of a grain of rice. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The walnut twig beetle is about the size of a grain of rice. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The walnut twig beetle is about the size of a grain of rice. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

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