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Posts Tagged: Robert Kimsey

On the Fly

A common green bottle fly, Lucilia sericata, seeking nectar on a tropical milkweed, Asclepias curassavica. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Flies seem to be in the news a lot lately. But have you ever looking closely at a common green bottle fly Lucilia sericata, also known as a...

A common green bottle fly, Lucilia sericata, seeking nectar on a tropical milkweed, Asclepias curassavica. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A common green bottle fly, Lucilia sericata, seeking nectar on a tropical milkweed, Asclepias curassavica. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A common green bottle fly, Lucilia sericata, seeking nectar on a tropical milkweed, Asclepias curassavica. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The green bottle fly sips some nectar from a tropical milkweed blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The green bottle fly sips some nectar from a tropical milkweed blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The green bottle fly sips some nectar from a tropical milkweed blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Flies can be pollinators, too, but they're better known for their forensic, veterinary and medical importance. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Flies can be pollinators, too, but they're better known for their forensic, veterinary and medical importance. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Flies can be pollinators, too, but they're better known for their forensic, veterinary and medical importance. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-up of a green bottle fly sipping nectar from a tropical milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Close-up of a green bottle fly sipping nectar from a tropical milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-up of a green bottle fly sipping nectar from a tropical milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, October 16, 2020 at 4:44 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Health, Yard & Garden

A 'Very Poor Year' for Monarchs in Pacific Northwest

This migrating monarch flew from a vineyard in Ashland, Ore. to a garden in Vacaville, Calif. in 2016. This amounted to  285 miles in seven days or about 40.7 miles per day, according to WSU entomologist David James, who studies migratory monarchs.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It's been a "very poor year" for monarch butterflies in the Pacific Northwest. So, folks, if you're in their migratory pathway and anticipate seeing...

This migrating monarch flew from a vineyard in Ashland, Ore. to a garden in Vacaville, Calif. in 2016. This amounted to  285 miles in seven days or about 40.7 miles per day, according to WSU entomologist David James, who studies migratory monarchs.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
This migrating monarch flew from a vineyard in Ashland, Ore. to a garden in Vacaville, Calif. in 2016. This amounted to 285 miles in seven days or about 40.7 miles per day, according to WSU entomologist David James, who studies migratory monarchs.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This migrating monarch flew from a vineyard in Ashland, Ore. to a garden in Vacaville, Calif. in 2016. This amounted to 285 miles in seven days or about 40.7 miles per day, according to WSU entomologist David James, who studies migratory monarchs.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A tattered and torn migrating monarch in Vacaville, Calif. This image was taken in 2016. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A tattered and torn migrating monarch in Vacaville, Calif. This image was taken in 2016. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A tattered and torn migrating monarch in Vacaville, Calif. This image was taken in 2016. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A newly eclosed female monarch. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A newly eclosed female monarch. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A newly eclosed female monarch. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A newly eclosed male monarch. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A newly eclosed male monarch. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A newly eclosed male monarch. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, September 14, 2020 at 2:12 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Innovation, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

Robert Kimsey and Elvira Galvan Hack: Making a Difference

Forensic entomologist Robert Kimsey in his habitat at Briggs Hall, UC Davis. He received an international award for his academic advising. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

They're making a difference: locally, regionally, nationally and now internationally. If you're involved in the Animal Biology (ABI) major, an...

Forensic entomologist Robert Kimsey in his habitat at Briggs Hall, UC Davis. He received an international award for his academic advising. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Forensic entomologist Robert Kimsey in his habitat at Briggs Hall, UC Davis. He received an international award for his academic advising. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Forensic entomologist Robert Kimsey in his habitat at Briggs Hall, UC Davis. He received an international award for his academic advising. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Elvira Galvan Hack is the winner of an international award for her work in advising undergraduate students in the animal biology major at UC Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Elvira Galvan Hack is the winner of an international award for her work in advising undergraduate students in the animal biology major at UC Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Elvira Galvan Hack is the winner of an international award for her work in advising undergraduate students in the animal biology major at UC Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Congrats to Lynn and Bob Kimsey and Walter Leal

Lynn Kimsey directs the Bohart Museum of Entomology at UC Davis.  (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Congratulations to the three UC Davis faculty members who will receive prestigious awards next week from the Pacific Branch, Entomological...

Lynn Kimsey directs the Bohart Museum of Entomology at UC Davis.  (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Lynn Kimsey directs the Bohart Museum of Entomology at UC Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Lynn Kimsey directs the Bohart Museum of Entomology at UC Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Forensic entomologist Robert Kimsey in his habitat, his office at Briggs Hall. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Forensic entomologist Robert Kimsey in his habitat, his office at Briggs Hall. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Forensic entomologist Robert Kimsey in his habitat, his office at Briggs Hall. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Chemical ecologist Walter Leal, UC Davis distinguished professor, studies insect chemical communication. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Chemical ecologist Walter Leal, UC Davis distinguished professor, studies insect chemical communication. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Chemical ecologist Walter Leal, UC Davis distinguished professor, studies insect chemical communication. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, April 14, 2020 at 4:49 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Economic Development, Environment, Innovation, Natural Resources, Pest Management

Ever Seen a Coronavirus-Equipped Mantis?

This is the coronavirus-equipped  mantis that's drawing lots of smiles in the Davis front yard of entomologists Robert and Lynn Kimsey of UC Davis. (Photo by Lynn Kimsey)

Sometimes you just have to display your sense of humor. Take the case of a huge praying mantis sculpture that anchors the Davis, Calif., front yard...

This is the coronavirus-equipped  mantis that's drawing lots of smiles in the Davis front yard of entomologists Robert and Lynn Kimsey of UC Davis. (Photo by Lynn Kimsey)
This is the coronavirus-equipped mantis that's drawing lots of smiles in the Davis front yard of entomologists Robert and Lynn Kimsey of UC Davis. (Photo by Lynn Kimsey)

This is the coronavirus-equipped mantis that's drawing lots of smiles in the Davis front yard of entomologists Robert and Lynn Kimsey of UC Davis. (Photo by Lynn Kimsey)

A praying mantis, Mantis religiosa, watches a honey bee buzz her head in the Kate Frey Pollinator Garden, Sonoma Cornerstone, Sonoma. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A praying mantis, Mantis religiosa, watches a honey bee buzz her head in the Kate Frey Pollinator Garden, Sonoma Cornerstone, Sonoma. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A praying mantis, Mantis religiosa, watches a honey bee buzz her head in the Kate Frey Pollinator Garden, Sonoma Cornerstone, Sonoma. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, April 6, 2020 at 1:54 PM
Focus Area Tags: Economic Development, Environment, Natural Resources, Pest Management

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