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Posts Tagged: Philippe Rolshausen

ANR in the news April 16-30, 2020

Dawn Kooyumjian is interviewed by KCBS reporter Matt Biglar about the UC Master Gardeners in Contra Costa County donating plants to Oakland students.

Coronavirus's next victim: Big Meat

(Grist) Nathanael Johnson, April 30

“It's going to cause price spikes somewhere downstream,” said Rich Sexton, an agricultural economist at the University of California, Davis. But the average shopper might only notice empty shelves rather than higher prices, because “big grocery chains don't like to jack up prices, especially in times like this.”

…“There is going to be even more of a rush to automate farmwork and slaughterhouses,” Sexton said.

https://grist.org/food/coronaviruss-next-victim-big-meat/

As meat plants idle, California has no shortage of fish, dairy

(NBC News) Dennis Romero, April 29

…California produces about 20 percent of the nation's milk and has a large poultry processor in Foster Farms, but is otherwise dependent on the Midwest for pork and much of its beef, according to Daniel Sumner, director of the University of California's Agricultural Issues Center.

The state slaughters dairy cows for hamburger and raises calves for beef. But the 1-year-old livestock is sent to the Midwest for corn and soy feeding before being processed for beef there, he said. "We've never produced any hogs to speak of," Sumner added.

California producers fill nearly half the state's chicken and egg demand, he said.

https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/meat-plants-idle-california-has-no-shortage-fish-dairy-n1194906

1-In-4 San Diegans Unemployed From Pandemic, North County Wants Businesses To Reopen, San Diego Sees Drop In Homelessness, And Online Learning Nightmare For Vets

(KPBS Midday Edition) Maureen Cavanaugh and Jade Hindmon, April 29

An estimated 25% of San Diegans are out of work because of the pandemic, according to a new SANDAG report. Plus, a handful of North County mayors want businesses in their towns to reopen sooner rather than later. Also, homelessness in San Diego is seeing a decline, according to the latest homeless count. Also, it's not just young students who are having a hard time with distance learning, veteran students are also dealing with the challenges of virtual classrooms. ... Finally, growing your own veggies? Some gardening tips from a master gardener. [UC Master Gardener Sommer Cartier discusses a new website to help gardeners https://www.mastergardenersd.org/lets-grow-together-san-diego/.]

https://www.kpbs.org/news/midday-edition/

Virus-related food shortages will be temporary in U.S., experts say

(Farm Press) Tim Hearden, April 29

…“Every economist agrees that the massive hit to the world economy and trade will likely cause millions of very poor people to be out of work and with no income,” said agricultural economist Daniel Sumner, director of the University of California's Agricultural Issues Center. “This is a consequence of the disease, but also of the policy of shutting down the economy.

“In poor countries, when the economy is shut down, the poorest people get even more hungry and people die, especially the kids,” Sumner said in an email.

https://www.farmprogress.com/farm-business/virus-related-food-shortages-will-be-temporary-us-experts-say

'We're in pretty good shape' | Northern California unlikely to see meat shortage

(ABC10) Lena Howland, April 29

… Despite the ad Tyson Foods released over the weekend, saying the food supply chain in America is breaking, UC Davis Professor Daniel Sumner said we could expect to see some higher prices, but he doesn't expect to see shelves being wiped out anytime soon.

"If you want to have some very specialized meat product, you may find that in short supply in your local market on the day you're shopping, if you went back the next day, it may be there, but I don't think anybody has to worry about the supply chain in America, we're in pretty good shape," Sumner said.

And he said the only way we will see a shortage is if people panic buy, just like they did with toilet paper.

"As we've learned in the past month or two, you could certainly create a shortage in the sense that consumers can altogether if we all ran out and decided to stock up every freezer space that we have with steaks and pork chops," Summer said.

https://www.abc10.com/article/news/health/coronavirus/northern-california-unlikely-to-see-meat-shortage/103-75dfef60-0fbd-455f-952b-58d70de96ea1

Nature And The Coronavirus: As Humans Continue Lockdown, Wildlife Creeps Back In

(On Point NPR) Brittany Knotts and Meghna Chakrabarti, April 29

Humanity in lockdown. Wildlife creeps back into cities around the world. We look at the pandemic from the animal kingdom's point of view.

Guests: Niamh Quinn, human-wildlife interactions advisor for the University of California Cooperative's South Coast Research and Extension Center. (@niamhnichuinn)

https://www.wbur.org/onpoint/2020/04/29/wildlife-coronavirus-animals-climate

Scientist at work: Trapping urban coyotes to see if they can be 'hazed' away from human neighborhoods

(Conversation) Niamh Quinn, April 29

After weeks of sleepless nights spent scrutinizing grainy images relayed from our remote cameras, mostly of waving grass and tumbling leaves, finally, there it is. A live coyote with a loop around its neck. On October 8, 2019, my colleagues and I caught the first member of the University of California Agriculture and Natural Resources pack, #19CU001.

https://www.fairfieldcitizenonline.com/news/article/Scientist-at-work-Trapping-urban-coyotes-to-see-15233700.php

Coronavirus: Should California brace for a meat shortage? Not exactly, say industry experts

(SF Chronicle) Esther Mobley, April 28

… There's not a shortage, exactly, say industry experts, though interruptions to the supply chain mean that it's taking a little longer than usual for meat to get from a farm to your grocery store shelf.

“We will have a short period where we have fewer packages of meat in the case,” said Daniel A. Sumner, director of the University of California Agricultural Issues Center. It will be an inconvenience, he said: “Let's say you like thin-cut pork chops, I like thick-cut pork chops. Well, one of us will be disappointed if we shop late in the day.”

https://www.sfchronicle.com/food/article/Should-California-brace-for-a-meat-shortage-Not-15232223.php

Carbon Sequestration in Vineyards

(AgInfo) Tim Hammerich, April 27

...However, Extension Specialist Kaan Kurtural and his team at the Oakville Experiment Station are currently evaluating the impact cover crops can have on carbon sequestration in vineyards.

Kurtural…”Growers came to us. A couple of the questions they had was how can we sequester the carbon and how can we mitigate the amount of greenhouse gases we emit from the vineyards? So that was some background work done on it. Cover crops do sequester carbon and will store it in the soil. But as you till them, if you till the row middles, all this stuff is release back into the atmosphere. So we worked with a couple of private companies and we were able to get this new type of cover crop using a perennial system. Meaning that it doesn't have to be tilled or mowed, it just goes dormant. So we're comparing now till versus no-till systems using perennial and annual cover crops. So that's how that began.”

https://www.aginfo.net/report/45829/California-Ag-Today/Carbon-Sequestration-in-Vineyards

Covid-19 has forced large-scale farms that supply institutions to dump produce they can't sell. Why can't it just feed hungry people ? We've got answers.

(Counter) Lela Nargi, April 27

To get a clearer understanding of where institutional food comes from, why kinks at the center of the supply chain make rerouting a challenge, and what's being done to change that, I talked to a variety of agriculture experts.

Dr. Gail Feenstra, deputy director, Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education Program, University of California Davis: Our food system generally is built for global distribution. Now that's suddenly cracked, people are going back to more local food systems, where [important middle-tier components] like storage facilities [for meat and grain] aren't available.

Feenstra: In California, some new food hubs are starting up to make the connection between small- and mid-scale famers with excess, and consumers who use CalFresh/SNAP. There's also work being done to figure out how to change CSAs to direct delivery or drop-off. Who is making these connections are co-op extension service agents, in every county in the U.S. They can share resources and research, and have access to grant monies. One agent told me she worked with county board supervisors to keep farmers' markets open, then with market managers to reorganize to keep the markets safe.

https://thecounter.org/covid-19-produce-dumping-food-banks/

COVID-19 outbreak causing possible meat shortage across US

(KRON4) Dan Thorn, April 26

…“That doesn't seem to be on the horizon yet… but we have had some disruptions,” Daniel Summer said.

Those disruptions, says Daniel Sumner — a U.C. Davis agricultural economist — will not create a shortage of meat.

Even after the country's largest meat producers including Tyson, along Smithfield and JBS have recently shuttered processing plants.

“You and I may see our favorite supermarket low on something but there will be plenty of meat –beef, pork and chicken that we all like there will be plenty of meat in the supermarkets,” Summer said.

https://www.kron4.com/news/bay-area/covid-19-outbreak-causing-possible-meat-shortage-across-us/

Marin farm sector struggles as virus cripples food services

(Marin IJ) Richard Halstead, April 26

… Randi Black, a University of California Cooperative Extension dairy adviser for Marin County, said, “We're kind of lucky where we are. We haven't been impacted quite as much as some of the eastern U.S. dairies have been. That's where we're seeing a lot of milk dumping.”

Black said that is because processors who buy Marin dairy farmers' milk sell most of their milk to grocery stores, while processors in the east rely more heavily on the food-services industry, which includes restaurants, hotels and airlines.

https://www.marinij.com/2020/04/26/marin-farm-sector-struggles-as-virus-cripples-food-services/

Want to save your citrus trees? Start a full-fledged insect war

(Los Angeles Times) Jeanette Marantos, April 25

…In citrus-loving California, some 60% of homes already have one or more citrus trees in their yard, said UC Riverside entomologist Elizabeth Grafton-Cardwell, director of the Lindcove Research and Extension Center in Exeter. (That's a statewide average, with fewer in Northern California and more in Southern California, she said.)

…But Mark Hoddle, a biological control specialist at UC Riverside, sees things differently. Hoddle and his entomologist wife, Christina Hoddle, also at UC Riverside, went to Pakistan in 2010 looking for natural enemies of the Asian citrus psyllid, and there they found Tamarixia radiata, tiny parasitoid wasps that lay their eggs on the backs of psyllid toddlers (a.k.a. nymphs).

https://www.latimes.com/lifestyle/story/2020-04-24/how-to-save-your-citrus-from-hlb-disease

Even as new technologies revolutionize farming, not everyone has access

(Sac Biz Journal) Emily Hamann, April 24

Technology could hold the key to solving growers' issues both around labor and water.

George Zhuang, a farm adviser with the UC Cooperative Extension, works with wine grape growers in the Fresno region, where machines have largely taken over the job of growing grapes.

“Most newly established vineyards go to 100% mechanization,” Zhuang said.

https://www.bizjournals.com/sacramento/news/2020/04/24/even-as-new-technologies-revolutionize-farming-not.html

Amid rising costs and limited availability, farmers struggle to find enough workers

(Sac Biz Journal) Emily Hamann, April 24

…Wine grapes are known for being especially labor intensive. Grape harvesters have been commonplace in vineyards in the San Joaquin Valley for decades, but vines still needed maintenance, including pulling leaves and trimming shoots, by hand. Now that's changing as well, said Kaan Kurtural, viticulture specialist at the UC Davis.

…“We have a lot of consolidation in our business,” Kurtural said. “Vineyards are getting larger as farmers are getting old and their kids don't want to do this anymore, so they're selling their holdings.”

https://www.bizjournals.com/sacramento/news/2020/04/24/amid-rising-costs-and-limited-availability-farmers.html

A Strained Food Chain

(Health in all Matters) Michael Joyce, April 24

 COVID-19 has drastically disrupted the way food is produced, distributed, and available in the U.S. and around the world. The toll of the virus on those who plant, pick, buy, sell, and, at times, go hungry, is increasing. In this episode, we explore the vulnerabilities of a complex and interconnected food system and the inevitable bright spots along the way.

Guest: Daniel Sumner

https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/a-strained-food-chain/id1503590411?i=1000472557618

Farmers face new challenges in their ongoing quest for water

(Sac Biz Journal) Emily Hamann, April 24

…“Almond trees are actually pretty resilient,” said Katherine Jarvis-Shean, a Sacramento-area orchard farm advisor with the University of California Cooperative Extension.

While the trees themselves can live through a drought year, insufficient water will reduce yields for the present season and seasons into the future, Jarvis-Shean said.

But this year growers can also rely on groundwater pumped from wells drilled into a patchwork of underground aquifers.

“One year with low precipitation is not a problem with groundwater,” Jarvis-Shean said. “The problem is if we continue to have dry winters.”

https://www.bizjournals.com/sacramento/news/2020/04/24/farmers-face-new-challenges-in-their-ongoing-quest.html

Protecting The Valley's Vulnerable Populations From COVID-19

(KVPR) Kathleen Schock, April 24

COVID-19 is disproportionately hurting vulnerable communities like seniors, ag workers and the homeless. To learn about efforts to protect these at-risk populations, FM89's Kathleen Schock spoke with Lisa Blecker, pesticide safety education program coordinator for the UC Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources, Laura Moreno, chair of the Fresno Madera Continuum of Care, and Kristen Beall Watson, CEO of the Kern Community Foundation.

https://www.kvpr.org/post/protecting-valleys-vulnerable-populations-covid-19

Too celebratory for a pandemic, California's farmed oysters and caviar lose their markets

(San Francisco Chronicle) Janelle Bitker, April 24

…California's aquaculture industry, which includes farmed trout, clams and mussels in addition to higher-end abalone and oysters, represents about $200 million in annual sales, according to Jackson Gross, an aquaculture specialist at UC Davis.

…“Are people willing to pay for a premium local product?,” Gross said. “They're doing that at restaurants, but they're getting the frozen stuff from the big chain stores.”

https://www.sfchronicle.com/restaurants/article/Too-celebratory-for-a-pandemic-California-s-15222247.php

Stop stable flies from biting into profits

(Progressive Dairy) Julia Hollister, April 23

It only takes five stable flies biting on the front legs of a cow to reduce weight gains and milk yields, according to Alec Gerry, a University of California – Davis veterinary entomology specialist.

Gerry, who spoke at the 2020 Golden State Management Conference in Modesto, California, has been researching flies for over 25 years. His most recent studies are in collaboration with researchers at the Veterinary Medicine Teaching and Research Center in Tulare, California.

https://www.progressivedairy.com/topics/herd-health/stop-stable-flies-from-biting-into-profits

In The Quiet Of Sheltering In Place, Have You Encountered Wildlife Differently?

(KPCC ) Larry Mantle, April 23

As the quarantine continues, residents surrounding Griffith Park have shared that they're noticing more wildlife activity - hawk nests, deer in the hills, opossums on the roads. 

According to the Los Angeles Times, some wildlife biologists are saying what's changed isn't animal behavior but our own. We finally have the time and the patience to notice the wildlife around us. 

GUEST: Niamh Quinn, human-wildlife interactions advisor with the University of California's Cooperative Extension, a branch of the UC system which researches local issues; she tweets @niamhnichuinn

https://www.scpr.org/programs/airtalk/2020/04/23/65548/in-the-quiet-of-sheltering-in-place-have-you-encou/

Oakland Schools Use Gardening to Help Families

(KCBS radio) Matt Biglar, April 23

Canned food... diapers... tomato plants?
As KCBS Radio's Matt Bigler reports, Oakland schools are helping families get food and supplies and also get into gardening.

The plant giveaway came out of the Contra Costa Master Gardeners spring fundraiser, which unfortunately withered and died this season.

“But with the shelter in place order, we were unable to hold our plant sale.” Dawn Kooyumjian said, they decided to donate their seedlings to nearly 50 organizations, including Oakland Unified.

“People are able to come, pick up their necessities that the school district is providing, and also take home a vegetable plant that will allow them to have a little bit of food security in their home.

https://kcbsradio.radio.com/media/audio-channel/oakland-schools-use-gardening-to-help-families

The Great Potato Giveaway

(NPR) Stacey Vanek Smith, April 23

…Daniel Sumner is an agricultural economist at the University of California, Davis. He says the problem boils down to two things.

DANIEL SUMNER: How streamlined and specialized things are.

...SUMNER: The farmer will be linked directly to the restaurant customers and grow for that restaurant in San Francisco or New York City or somebody growing exactly the kind of lettuce that McDonald's needs for their hamburgers. That's been a great system.

https://www.npr.org/2020/04/23/843437140/the-great-potato-giveaway

Lockdown silver linings: For a Sacramento family, baby chickens bring meaning, solace

(Sac Bee) Diana Williams, April 22

…Imagine my delight in stumbling across a backyard chicken census online. It's overseen by Maurice Pitesky, a veterinarian and epidemiologist at the UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine-Cooperative Extension.

Pitesky's best guess is there are about 100,000 backyard flocks in California. Sacramento probably has about 11 percent of them, making ours the third-highest backyard chicken region in the state, behind Los Angeles and San Francisco.

https://www.sacbee.com/entertainment/living/article242190746.html

Volunteer program donates over 30,000 plants to community gardens in Contra Costa

(KRON4) Omar Perez, April 21

A volunteer program donates thousands of vegetable plants to local undeserved communities in the Bay Area free of charge. Over the last few weeks volunteers for The Contra Costa Master Gardeners Program donated more than 30,000 plants to local school and community gardens.

…“Because of COVID-19 they were not able to have the sale so they quickly decided they would distribute the plants for free to local communities, elderly and schools,” Bay Area Program Director Frank McPherson said.

https://www.kron4.com/features/kron4-heroes/volunteer-program-donates-over-30000-plants-to-local-school-and-community-gardens-in-contra-costa/

Coyotes, falcons, deer and other wildlife are reclaiming L.A. territory as humans stay at home

(LA Times) Louis Sahagun, April 21

Similarly, research scientist Niamh Quinn, who serves as human-wildlife interactions advisor for UC Cooperative Extension, said none of the five collared coyotes she is studying in the cities of Hacienda Heights, Roland Heights, La Verne and Chino Hills “have changed their behavior yet.”

“I do believe, however, that human behavior has been altered significantly by the lockdown in ways that are closing the gap between us and what's wild around our own homes — and that's great, up to a point,” she said.

She worries that animals may be pushed into closer conflicts with humans. “We have to interact with wildlife from a distance. That is because we still do not know all the diseases that, say, coyotes and rats carry with them.”

https://www.latimes.com/environment/story/2020-04-21/wildlife-thrives-amid-coronavirus-lockdown

A century later, victory gardens connect Americans again

(AP) Kristin M, Hall, April 21

… Creating a victory garden now can be, as it was during World Wars I and II, a shared experience during hardship and uncertainty.

“World War I, to me, is a pretty stark parallel,” said Rose Hayden-Smith, a historian and author of “Sowing the Seeds of Victory: American Gardening Programs of World War I.” “Not only was there a war, but there was an influenza pandemic.”

… “So these gardening posters and food preservation posters would appear in literally dozens of languages,” said Hayden-Smith....“We don't have poster art, but we have Instagram,” she said.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/home/a-century-later-victory-gardens-connect-americans-again/2020/04/21/18c69bce-83e2-11ea-81a3-9690c9881111_story.html

Empty Grocery Shelves and Rotting, Wasted Vegetables: Two Sides of a Supply Chain Problem

(Inside Climate News) Georgina Gustin, April 19

"In terms of resilience and nimbleness, they seem to be able to pivot and figure out new supply chains quickly," said Gail Feenstra, deputy director of the University of California-Davis Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education Program (SAREP). "They're always struggling because of the competition that comes from the global food system. It puts many of them at a disadvantage. But now that system is in complete disarray. It allows these regional food systems to emerge. They're the ones that are bringing relief to communities."

… "This is more than a dress rehearsal. This is it," said Feenstra, of UC-Davis, referring to the disruptions caused by the pandemic. "This is going to be here for a while and it isn't the last time this will happen. This is an opportunity for our policy makers to invest in small and mid-scale businesses."

https://insideclimatenews.org/news/17042020/coronavirus-agriculture-supply-chain-grocery-store-farming

Is your tree on death's door? Here's how to tell

(LA Times) Jeanette Marantos, April 19

Climate change, invasive species and even international trade are taking a serious toll on California trees. An estimated 150 million trees died during the drought that started in December 2011, according to Smithsonian Magazine, and the stressed trees that survived became more vulnerable to attack by a host of newcomer pests, said Philippe Rolshausen, subtropical tree specialist for the Cooperative Extension office at UC Riverside.

"There are lots of invasive pests everywhere because of global warming and the movement of plant materials in general," he said. 

https://www.pottsmerc.com/lifestyle/is-your-tree-on-deaths-door-heres-how-to-tell/article_cf72a557-5531-51f6-9fe2-b445055ebb1d.html

Fresh Produce and Milk Go to Waste Even as People Need Food Amid Coronavirus Pandemic

(KQED Forum) Michael Krasny, April 16

Even as food banks are seeing more demand than ever, some California farmers are dumping milk and letting produce rot. The coronavirus pandemic has disrupted how we eat and in turn, how food is distributed. The closure of many restaurants, venues, and schools is leaving many food suppliers with excess perishables. Meanwhile, retailers and food banks are scrambling to keep food in stock. We talk with experts about how California's food supply chain has been disrupted, how it's adapting, and what to expect in the months to come.

Guests: Dan Sumner, professor of agricultural and resource economics, UC Davis

https://www.kqed.org/forum/2010101877032/fresh-produce-and-milk-goes-to-waste-even-as-people-need-food-amid-coronavirus-pandemic

Posted on Friday, May 1, 2020 at 4:25 PM

California trees are suffering under climate change and invasive pests

Branch die-back in a Chinese flame tree because of invasive shothole borer infestation. (Photo: Beatriz Nobua-Behrmann)
Trees are facing stress from a variety of pressures in California, including climate change and exotic invasive pests, reported Jeanette Marantos in the Los Angeles Times

“There are lots of invasive pests everywhere because of global warming and the movement of plant materials in general,” said Philippe Rolshausen, UC Cooperative Extension subtropical tree specialist at UC Riverside.

Yellowing leaves, a thinning canopy and branch die-back are symptoms that the tree is sick. UC Master Gardeners, headquartered in UCCE county offices across the state, can provide free help, the article said.

Marantos listed possible reasons for common tree symptoms:

Yellow leaves: May be due to a lack of nutrients. A sudden jolt of fertilizer isn't the best solution. Homeowners often remove the best fertilizer and mulch for trees — their own fallen leaves.

Thinning canopies and branch die-back: May be the result of a soil-born disease, such a phytophthora, caused by excessive water. “Homeowners have a tendency to over-irrigate a tree that's not doing well, but soil-borne diseases actually thrive in wet soils, so that's making things even worse,” Rolshausen said. “Trees don't like standing water on their root systems because they can't breathe.”

Huanglongbing of citrus: Invested trees send up shoots of bright yellow leaves. Eventually, new leaves get twisted and mottled and the fruit stops ripening. The disease was first spotted in Southern California in the late 1990s and has since been detected in Los Angeles, Orange, San Bernardino and Riverside counties, according to a map prepared by University of California Agriculture and Natural Resources.

The Times article also recommended the UC Integrated Pest Management Program website to learn how to diagnose and control tree insects and diseases.

Posted on Monday, March 2, 2020 at 8:59 AM
Focus Area Tags: Yard & Garden
 
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