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Posts Tagged: Morningsun Herb Farm

Check Out the Open Farm Day in Vacaville on Saturday, Aug. 4

You're likely to see lots of bees at the Open Farm Tour, especially in the Morningsun Herb Farm nursery. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

What's life like on the farm? If you're looking for something to do on Saturday, Aug. 4, the Pleasants Valley Agriculture Association (PVAA) of...

You're likely to see lots of bees at the Open Farm Tour, especially in the Morningsun Herb Farm nursery. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
You're likely to see lots of bees at the Open Farm Tour, especially in the Morningsun Herb Farm nursery. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

You're likely to see lots of bees at the Open Farm Tour, especially in the Morningsun Herb Farm nursery. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A goat at the Morningsun Herb Farm readily accepts a carrot. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A goat at the Morningsun Herb Farm readily accepts a carrot. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A goat at the Morningsun Herb Farm readily accepts a carrot. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, July 31, 2018 at 5:00 PM
Focus Area Tags: Family, Food, Health, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

Why Beauty Is in the Eye of the Bee-Holder

A crabronid wasp or beewolf foraging on a pineapple sea lily (Eryngium horridum) at the Morningsun Herb Farm, Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Irish novelist Margaret Wolfe Hungerford was right. In Molly Bawn, published in 1878, Hungerford wrote "Beauty is in the eye of the beholder,"...

A crabronid wasp or beewolf foraging on a pineapple sea lily (Eryngium horridum) at the Morningsun Herb Farm, Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A crabronid wasp or beewolf foraging on a pineapple sea lily (Eryngium horridum) at the Morningsun Herb Farm, Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A crabronid wasp or beewolf foraging on a pineapple sea lily (Eryngium horridum) at the Morningsun Herb Farm, Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Beewolves prey on honey bees, but in this case, both the beewolf and the honey bee are intent on foraging for nectar. At the top is a third insect: a mordellid beetle. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Beewolves prey on honey bees, but in this case, both the beewolf and the honey bee are intent on foraging for nectar. At the top is a third insect: a mordellid beetle. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Beewolves prey on honey bees, but in this case, both the beewolf and the honey bee are intent on foraging for nectar. At the top is a third insect: a mordellid beetle. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Well, hello there! The beewolf eyes the camera. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Well, hello there! The beewolf eyes the camera. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Well, hello there! The beewolf eyes the camera. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

See ya! The beewolf turns away from the photographer. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
See ya! The beewolf turns away from the photographer. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

See ya! The beewolf turns away from the photographer. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, July 9, 2018 at 4:21 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Pest Management, Yard & Garden

Tantalizing Tomatoes Tempted Trish

I was on a gardening outing last week at a local iris farm, and on my drive home my co-pilot gardener and I had to stop by Morningsun Herb Farm since we were driving right by. What fun, we both love to window shop in spring and pick up a few newbie's to try in our gardens. We found  a good assortment of basil, squash, and tomatoes. I chose 'Pruden's Purple' as my tomato experiment this year. I have just found that others have grown this indeterminate variety to a size of 6 to 12 feet tall. My, my. The fruit are about one pound each and are similar to 'Brandywine',  another of my favorites. So, I thought maybe I should put up some support now. I just happen to have a number of old trellises in storage. Our side fence finally crashed with a recent wind storm. I salvaged a number of trellises and thought "why not!". So this morning I pulled out some leftover acrylic paint and have given three trellises a new purpose. 


So now with the trellises and pots this year for the veg garden, trying to be a little neater this year, well at least I will try. 

'Prudens Purple' tomato and lettuce leaf basil lie underneath trellises. (photo by Trisha Rose)
'Prudens Purple' tomato and lettuce leaf basil lie underneath trellises. (photo by Trisha Rose)

Posted on Monday, May 7, 2012 at 11:40 AM
 
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