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Posts Tagged: Lynn Kimsey

Bohart Museum Receives Collection of More than 50,000 Aculeate Wasp Specimens

Female golden hunting wasp dragging a paralyzed spider   to its nest. (Photo by Tony Wills, courtesy of Wikipedia)

If you've ever seen a spider-hunting wasp capture, sting, and paralyze a spider, you know what these wasps can do. Renowned wasp...

Female golden hunting wasp dragging a paralyzed spider   to its nest. (Photo by Tony Wills, courtesy of Wikipedia)
Female golden hunting wasp dragging a paralyzed spider to its nest. (Photo by Tony Wills, courtesy of Wikipedia)

Female golden hunting wasp dragging a paralyzed spider to its nest. (Photo by Tony Wills, courtesy of Wikipedia)

Bohart Museum director Lynn Kimsey (inside truck) and husband UC Davis forensic entomologist Bob Kimsey unload the U-Haul truck. At right is Bohart research associate Brennen Dyer. Also helping are Kimsey friends, Mike Whitney (retired Placer County sheriff) and his wife, Becky. (Photo by Steve Heydon)
Bohart Museum director Lynn Kimsey (inside truck) and husband UC Davis forensic entomologist Bob Kimsey unload the U-Haul truck. At right is Bohart research associate Brennen Dyer. Also helping are Kimsey friends, Mike Whitney (retired Placer County sheriff) and his wife, Becky. (Photo by Steve Heydon)

Bohart Museum director Lynn Kimsey (inside truck) and husband UC Davis forensic entomologist Bob Kimsey unload the U-Haul truck. At right is Bohart research associate Brennen Dyer. Also helping are Kimsey friends, Mike Whitney (retired Placer County sheriff) and his wife, Becky. (Photo by Steve Heydon)

The Marius Wasbauer aculeate (stinging) wasp specimens total more than 50,000. (Photo by Steve Heydon)
The Marius Wasbauer aculeate (stinging) wasp specimens total more than 50,000. (Photo by Steve Heydon)

The Marius Wasbauer aculeate (stinging) wasp specimens total more than 50,000. (Photo by Steve Heydon)

Posted on Thursday, June 3, 2021 at 5:37 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Natural Resources

The Beetles, a Growing Concern in Davis

UC Davis professor Lynn Kimsey, director of the Bohart Museum of Entomology, shows how flour and cereal should be stored. (Screen shot from her presentation on YouTube.)

The beetles are coming! No, this is not a historical reference to that famed rock band from Liverpool. These are real beetles. The insects. Lynn...

UC Davis professor Lynn Kimsey, director of the Bohart Museum of Entomology, shows how flour and cereal should be stored. (Screen shot from her presentation on YouTube.)
UC Davis professor Lynn Kimsey, director of the Bohart Museum of Entomology, shows how flour and cereal should be stored. (Screen shot from her presentation on YouTube.)

UC Davis professor Lynn Kimsey, director of the Bohart Museum of Entomology, shows how flour and cereal should be stored. (Screen shot from her presentation on YouTube.)

Posted on Tuesday, May 18, 2021 at 3:20 PM
Focus Area Tags: Economic Development, Environment, Innovation, Pest Management

Happy 'World Robber Fly Day!'

UC Davis doctoral candidate  Charlotte Herbert Alberts reads to her son, Griffin, born in April of 2020.

Do you know that today is "World Robber Fly Day?" "World Robber Day?" you ask. No, "World Robber Fly Day." Among those celebrating this special...

UC Davis doctoral candidate  Charlotte Herbert Alberts reads to her son, Griffin, born in April of 2020.
UC Davis doctoral candidate Charlotte Herbert Alberts reads to her son, Griffin, born in April of 2020.

UC Davis doctoral candidate Charlotte Herbert Alberts reads to her son, Griffin, born in April of 2020.

This family photo, taken in June 2020, shows George and Charlotte Alberts and their son, Griffin.
This family photo, taken in June 2020, shows George and Charlotte Alberts and their son, Griffin.

This family photo, taken in June 2020, shows George and Charlotte Alberts and their son, Griffin.

Posted on Friday, April 30, 2021 at 3:14 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Economic Development, Environment, Family, Innovation, Natural Resources

You Don't Have to Crane Your Neck to See Them

A common crane fly, Tipula oleracea, on a tower of jewels, Echium wildpretii. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

They're out there, and you don't have to crane your neck to see them. Some folks mistakenly call them "mosquito hawks" or "mosquito eaters," but...

A common crane fly, Tipula oleracea, on a tower of jewels, Echium wildpretii. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A common crane fly, Tipula oleracea, on a tower of jewels, Echium wildpretii. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A common crane fly, Tipula oleracea, on a tower of jewels, Echium wildpretii. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, April 26, 2021 at 6:18 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

Jeff Smith Zooms in on 'Mimicry in Butterflies and Moths'

Entomologist Jeff Smith, curator of the Lepidoptera collection at the Bohart Museum of Entomology laments the declining population of monarchs and advocates that people plant milkweed and nectar sources in their gardens. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Butterflies and moths totally fascinate entomologist Jeff Smith, the 32-year volunteer curator of the Bohart Museum of...

Entomologist Jeff Smith, curator of the Lepidoptera collection at the Bohart Museum of Entomology laments the declining population of monarchs and advocates that people plant milkweed and nectar sources in their gardens. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Entomologist Jeff Smith, curator of the Lepidoptera collection at the Bohart Museum of Entomology laments the declining population of monarchs and advocates that people plant milkweed and nectar sources in their gardens. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Entomologist Jeff Smith, curator of the Lepidoptera collection at the Bohart Museum of Entomology laments the declining population of monarchs and advocates that people plant milkweed and nectar sources in their gardens. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Larva of the Anise swallowtail,  Papillo zelicaon, resembles a bird dropping. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Larva of the Anise swallowtail, Papillo zelicaon, resembles a bird dropping. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Larva of the Anise swallowtail, Papillo zelicaon, resembles a bird dropping. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The passionflower, host plant of the Gulf Fritillary, offers toxicity to the caterpillars. This image shows two Gulf Fritillary caterpillars munching on the plant. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The passionflower, host plant of the Gulf Fritillary, offers toxicity to the caterpillars. This image shows two Gulf Fritillary caterpillars munching on the plant. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The passionflower, host plant of the Gulf Fritillary, offers toxicity to the caterpillars. This image shows two Gulf Fritillary caterpillars munching on the plant. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Entomologist Jeff Smith, curator of the Lepidoptera collection at the Bohart Museum, talks to visitors in this pre-COVID pandemic image. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Entomologist Jeff Smith, curator of the Lepidoptera collection at the Bohart Museum, talks to visitors in this pre-COVID pandemic image. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Entomologist Jeff Smith, curator of the Lepidoptera collection at the Bohart Museum, talks to visitors in this pre-COVID pandemic image. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, April 20, 2021 at 4:44 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Innovation, Natural Resources

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