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Posts Tagged: Lynn Kimsey

Why You Should Love Spiders--Or at Least Like Them!

A crab spider dining on a stink bug. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

We recently posted information about the Bohart Museum of Entomology's upcoming open house on "Eight-Legged Wonders," and several people responded...

A crab spider dining on a stink bug. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A crab spider dining on a stink bug. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A crab spider dining on a stink bug. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A crab spider has just snared a green bottle fly. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A crab spider has just snared a green bottle fly. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A crab spider has just snared a green bottle fly. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Find the camouflaged crab spider on the sedum. Honey bee, be aware. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Find the camouflaged crab spider on the sedum. Honey bee, be aware. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Find the camouflaged crab spider on the sedum. Honey bee, be aware. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This spider is simply stunning. It's a redfemured spotted orbwever, Neoscona domiciliorum. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
This spider is simply stunning. It's a redfemured spotted orbwever, Neoscona domiciliorum. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This spider is simply stunning. It's a redfemured spotted orbwever, Neoscona domiciliorum. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A jumping spider peers at the camera. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A jumping spider peers at the camera. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A jumping spider peers at the camera. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This crab spider, on a blanket flower or Gaillardia, is a camouflaged green. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
This crab spider, on a blanket flower or Gaillardia, is a camouflaged green. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This crab spider, on a blanket flower or Gaillardia, is a camouflaged green. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It's a wrap. An orbweaver has wrapped a bee, while a freeloader fly takes a bite. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
It's a wrap. An orbweaver has wrapped a bee, while a freeloader fly takes a bite. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It's a wrap. An orbweaver has wrapped a bee, while a freeloader fly takes a bite. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Visit to the Bohart Museum

UC Davis employee Michele Belden shows her son, Cash, 5, some of the butterflies in the Bohart Museum of Entomology. Belden manages the Aggie Surplus, formerly Bargain Barn, on campus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

When you're 5 years old, the world is full of wonders. Especially when your mother takes you to the Bohart Museum of Entomology to see the butterfly...

UC Davis employee Michele Belden shows her son, Cash, 5, some of the butterflies in the Bohart Museum of Entomology. Belden manages the Aggie Surplus, formerly Bargain Barn, on campus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
UC Davis employee Michele Belden shows her son, Cash, 5, some of the butterflies in the Bohart Museum of Entomology. Belden manages the Aggie Surplus, formerly Bargain Barn, on campus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis employee Michele Belden shows her son, Cash, 5, some of the butterflies in the Bohart Museum of Entomology. Belden manages the Aggie Surplus, formerly Bargain Barn, on campus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Entomologist Jeff Smith, curator of the Lepitopdera section at the Bohart Museum, shows a drawer full of butterflies to Michelle Belden and son, Cash, 5. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Entomologist Jeff Smith, curator of the Lepitopdera section at the Bohart Museum, shows a drawer full of butterflies to Michelle Belden and son, Cash, 5. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Entomologist Jeff Smith, curator of the Lepitopdera section at the Bohart Museum, shows a drawer full of butterflies to Michelle Belden and son, Cash, 5. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Entomologist Jeff Smith, curator of the Lepitopdera section at the Bohart Museum, talks to Michelle Belden and son, Cash, 5. In back is Bohart associate Greg Kareofelas, naturalist and photographer who helps conduct the butterfly/moth specimen tours. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Entomologist Jeff Smith, curator of the Lepitopdera section at the Bohart Museum, talks to Michelle Belden and son, Cash, 5. In back is Bohart associate Greg Kareofelas, naturalist and photographer who helps conduct the butterfly/moth specimen tours. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Entomologist Jeff Smith, curator of the Lepitopdera section at the Bohart Museum, talks to Michelle Belden and son, Cash, 5. In back is Bohart associate Greg Kareofelas, naturalist and photographer who helps conduct the butterfly/moth specimen tours. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Cash Belden, 5, smiles at the camera as he stands next to a drawer full of monarch specimens. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Cash Belden, 5, smiles at the camera as he stands next to a drawer full of monarch specimens. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Cash Belden, 5, smiles at the camera as he stands next to a drawer full of monarch specimens. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, February 27, 2019 at 5:00 PM

In Search of the World's Biggest Bee: How It Came to 'Bee'

Natural history photographer Clay Bolt photographs Wallace’s Giant See in its nest. The bee nests  in active termite mounds in the North Moluccas, Indonesia. (Copyright Simon Robson)

Imagine you're in an Indonesian rainforest and a humongous bee, with a wingspan of two and a half inches, flies over your head. The world's largest...

Natural history photographer Clay Bolt photographs Wallace’s Giant See in its nest. The bee nests  in active termite mounds in the North Moluccas, Indonesia. (Copyright Simon Robson)
Natural history photographer Clay Bolt photographs Wallace’s Giant See in its nest. The bee nests in active termite mounds in the North Moluccas, Indonesia. (Copyright Simon Robson)

Natural history photographer Clay Bolt photographs Wallace’s Giant See in its nest. The bee nests in active termite mounds in the North Moluccas, Indonesia. (Copyright Simon Robson)

Wallace’s Giant Bee. Megachile pluto, the world’s largest bee,  is approximately four times larger than a European honey bee. This is a composite. (Copyright Clay Bolt, www.claybolt.com)
Wallace’s Giant Bee. Megachile pluto, the world’s largest bee, is approximately four times larger than a European honey bee. This is a composite. (Copyright Clay Bolt, www.claybolt.com)

Wallace’s Giant Bee. Megachile pluto, the world’s largest bee, is approximately four times larger than a European honey bee. This is a composite. (Copyright Clay Bolt, www.claybolt.com)

'Bearing' a Close Resemblance

Entomologist/artist Charlotte Herbert Alberts wearing a red hooded sweatshirt: front view showing the Bohart logo and a tardigrade face. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

You've heard of the California Bear Flag, the one with the grizzly bear" right?  It's lettered with "California Republic." But have you heard...

Entomologist/artist Charlotte Herbert Alberts wearing a red hooded sweatshirt: front view showing the Bohart logo and a tardigrade face. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Entomologist/artist Charlotte Herbert Alberts wearing a red hooded sweatshirt: front view showing the Bohart logo and a tardigrade face. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Entomologist/artist Charlotte Herbert Alberts wearing a red hooded sweatshirt: front view showing the Bohart logo and a tardigrade face. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Back view: Entomologist-artist Charlotte Herbert Alberts shows the Bohart Republic's  bear flag, the water bear, that is. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Back view: Entomologist-artist Charlotte Herbert Alberts shows the Bohart Republic's bear flag, the water bear, that is. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Back view: Entomologist-artist Charlotte Herbert Alberts shows the Bohart Republic's bear flag, the water bear, that is. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Bohart associate Emma Cluff cuddles a tardigrade stuffed animal. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Bohart associate Emma Cluff cuddles a tardigrade stuffed animal. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Bohart associate Emma Cluff cuddles a tardigrade stuffed animal. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, February 20, 2019 at 5:03 PM

A Mid-Winter Gathering of Lepidopterists at Bohart Museum

Lepidopterists (from left) Paul Johnson, Jerry Powell and Bill Patterson discuss butterfly species. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Identification. Collaboration. Camaraderie. The scientists and butterfly/moth enthusiasts who gathered Saturday, Feb. 9 for the Northern California...

Lepidopterists (from left) Paul Johnson, Jerry Powell and Bill Patterson discuss butterfly species. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Lepidopterists (from left) Paul Johnson, Jerry Powell and Bill Patterson discuss butterfly species. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Lepidopterists (from left) Paul Johnson, Jerry Powell and Bill Patterson discuss butterfly species. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis entomology student Gwen Erdosh chats with Bohart associate Greg Kareofelas (left) and Christopher Jason, new UC Davis graduate in environmental science. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
UC Davis entomology student Gwen Erdosh chats with Bohart associate Greg Kareofelas (left) and Christopher Jason, new UC Davis graduate in environmental science. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis entomology student Gwen Erdosh chats with Bohart associate Greg Kareofelas (left) and Christopher Jason, new UC Davis graduate in environmental science. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Dick Meyer, who holds a doctorate in entomology from UC Davis, clarifies a butterfly question  with hobbyist Jeff Baier of Napa. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Dick Meyer, who holds a doctorate in entomology from UC Davis, clarifies a butterfly question with hobbyist Jeff Baier of Napa. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Dick Meyer, who holds a doctorate in entomology from UC Davis, clarifies a butterfly question with hobbyist Jeff Baier of Napa. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Butterfly conversation with (from left) John DeBenedictus, Val Albu, Bill Patterson and Christopher Jason. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Butterfly conversation with (from left) John DeBenedictus, Val Albu, Bill Patterson and Christopher Jason. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Butterfly conversation with (from left) John DeBenedictus, Val Albu, Bill Patterson and Christopher Jason. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Jerry Powell, emeritus director of the Essig Museum of Entomology, examines a specimen under the microscope. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Jerry Powell, emeritus director of the Essig Museum of Entomology, examines a specimen under the microscope. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Jerry Powell, emeritus director of the Essig Museum of Entomology, examines a specimen under the microscope. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

John Lane (left) and Larry Allen discuss specimens. At far right is Bill Patterson. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
John Lane (left) and Larry Allen discuss specimens. At far right is Bill Patterson. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

John Lane (left) and Larry Allen discuss specimens. At far right is Bill Patterson. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Kelly Richers (left) and Jerry Powell are key members of the Northern California Lepidopterists. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Kelly Richers (left) and Jerry Powell are key members of the Northern California Lepidopterists. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Kelly Richers (left) and Jerry Powell are key members of the Northern California Lepidopterists. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Engrossed in conversation are (from left) Max Klepikov, Jim Detla, John DeBenedictis and Jerry Powell. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Engrossed in conversation are (from left) Max Klepikov, Jim Detla, John DeBenedictis and Jerry Powell. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Engrossed in conversation are (from left) Max Klepikov, Jim Detla, John DeBenedictis and Jerry Powell. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Rosser Garrison (left) retired from the California Department of Food and Agriculture and co-author of a dragonfly book, talks dragonflies with Greg Kareofelas (center) and Christopher Jason. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Rosser Garrison (left) retired from the California Department of Food and Agriculture and co-author of a dragonfly book, talks dragonflies with Greg Kareofelas (center) and Christopher Jason. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Rosser Garrison (left) retired from the California Department of Food and Agriculture and co-author of a dragonfly book, talks dragonflies with Greg Kareofelas (center) and Christopher Jason. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Engaged in conversations (from left) Joel Hernandez, Dick Meyer and Christopher Jason, all who received degrees from UC Davis. At far right is Jerry Powell, emeritus director of the Essig Museum. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Engaged in conversations (from left) Joel Hernandez, Dick Meyer and Christopher Jason, all who received degrees from UC Davis. At far right is Jerry Powell, emeritus director of the Essig Museum. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Engaged in conversations (from left) Joel Hernandez, Dick Meyer and Christopher Jason, all who received degrees from UC Davis. At far right is Jerry Powell, emeritus director of the Essig Museum. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Author Lawrence
Author Lawrence "Larry" Allen shows his book to Christina Cunha (far left) of Modesto and her daughter, Madison Cunha, a self-described "aspiring entomologist." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Author Lawrence "Larry" Allen shows his book to Christina Cunha (far left) of Modesto and her daughter, Madison Cunha, a self-described "aspiring entomologist." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Bill Patterson (left), who holds a doctorate in entomology from UC Davis, and entomologist Jeff Smith, who curates the butterfly-moth section at the Bohart Museum of Entomology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Bill Patterson (left), who holds a doctorate in entomology from UC Davis, and entomologist Jeff Smith, who curates the butterfly-moth section at the Bohart Museum of Entomology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Bill Patterson (left), who holds a doctorate in entomology from UC Davis, and entomologist Jeff Smith, who curates the butterfly-moth section at the Bohart Museum of Entomology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Don Miller (left), professor at Chico State University and butterfly hobbyist and ecological restorer Jeffrey Caldwell share knowledge. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Don Miller (left), professor at Chico State University and butterfly hobbyist and ecological restorer Jeffrey Caldwell share knowledge. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Don Miller (left), professor at Chico State University and butterfly hobbyist and ecological restorer Jeffrey Caldwell share knowledge. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Entomologist Jeff Smith, who curates the Bohart Museum's collection of butterflies and moths, shows morpho butterflies. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Entomologist Jeff Smith, who curates the Bohart Museum's collection of butterflies and moths, shows morpho butterflies. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Entomologist Jeff Smith, who curates the Bohart Museum's collection of butterflies and moths, shows morpho butterflies. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

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