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Posts Tagged: Lynn Kimsey

Good News on the Asian-Giant-Hornet News Front

The Asian giant hornet measures a little less than two inches long. A nest was recently discovered and destroyed near Blaine, Wash. (Photo courtesy of the Washington Department of Agriculture)

California this year has faced the COVID-19 pandemic, disastrous wildfires, racial unrest, and political strife--a combination resulting in...

The Asian giant hornet measures a little less than two inches long. A nest was recently discovered and destroyed near Blaine, Wash. (Photo courtesy of the Washington Department of Agriculture)
The Asian giant hornet measures a little less than two inches long. A nest was recently discovered and destroyed near Blaine, Wash. (Photo courtesy of the Washington Department of Agriculture)

The Asian giant hornet measures a little less than two inches long. A nest was recently discovered and destroyed near Blaine, Wash. (Photo courtesy of the Washington Department of Agriculture)

Close-up of the Asian giant hornet, Vespa mandarinia.  (Photo courtesy of Washington Department of Agriculture)
Close-up of the Asian giant hornet, Vespa mandarinia. (Photo courtesy of Washington Department of Agriculture)

Close-up of the Asian giant hornet, Vespa mandarinia. (Photo courtesy of Washington Department of Agriculture)

Posted on Tuesday, October 27, 2020 at 4:28 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Economic Development, Environment, Pest Management

Green Hall: Fitting Tribute to Two Scientists

UC Davis geneticist Mel Green in his lab in 1967, and outside the future Green Hall, 2011. (UC Davis photos)

It's a fitting tribute to see the UC Davis Life Sciences Building recently renamed the Melvin M. and Kathleen C. Green Hall. The building, which...

Photographic illustration shows the Life Science Building's new name as it will appear above the doors. (UC Davis illustration)
Photographic illustration shows the Life Science Building's new name as it will appear above the doors. (UC Davis illustration)

Photographic illustration shows the Life Science Building's new name as it will appear above the doors. (UC Davis illustration)

Posted on Tuesday, September 29, 2020 at 2:53 PM
Focus Area Tags: Economic Development, Environment, Innovation, Natural Resources

A 'Very Poor Year' for Monarchs in Pacific Northwest

This migrating monarch flew from a vineyard in Ashland, Ore. to a garden in Vacaville, Calif. in 2016. This amounted to  285 miles in seven days or about 40.7 miles per day, according to WSU entomologist David James, who studies migratory monarchs.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It's been a "very poor year" for monarch butterflies in the Pacific Northwest. So, folks, if you're in their migratory pathway and anticipate seeing...

This migrating monarch flew from a vineyard in Ashland, Ore. to a garden in Vacaville, Calif. in 2016. This amounted to  285 miles in seven days or about 40.7 miles per day, according to WSU entomologist David James, who studies migratory monarchs.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
This migrating monarch flew from a vineyard in Ashland, Ore. to a garden in Vacaville, Calif. in 2016. This amounted to 285 miles in seven days or about 40.7 miles per day, according to WSU entomologist David James, who studies migratory monarchs.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This migrating monarch flew from a vineyard in Ashland, Ore. to a garden in Vacaville, Calif. in 2016. This amounted to 285 miles in seven days or about 40.7 miles per day, according to WSU entomologist David James, who studies migratory monarchs.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A tattered and torn migrating monarch in Vacaville, Calif. This image was taken in 2016. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A tattered and torn migrating monarch in Vacaville, Calif. This image was taken in 2016. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A tattered and torn migrating monarch in Vacaville, Calif. This image was taken in 2016. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A newly eclosed female monarch. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A newly eclosed female monarch. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A newly eclosed female monarch. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A newly eclosed male monarch. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A newly eclosed male monarch. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A newly eclosed male monarch. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, September 14, 2020 at 2:12 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Innovation, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

What You Need to Know About That Invasive Giant Hornet

This is a female Vespa mandarinia japonica by Yasunori Koide. (Creative Commons photo)

It's good to see Washington State University Extension's newly published, updated fact sheet on the Asian giant hornet, Vespa...

This is a female Vespa mandarinia japonica by Yasunori Koide. (Creative Commons photo)
This is a female Vespa mandarinia japonica by Yasunori Koide. (Creative Commons photo)

This is a female Vespa mandarinia japonica by Yasunori Koide. (Creative Commons photo)

Screen shot of the life cycle that appears in the WSU Extension fact sheet on the Asian giant hornet, Vespa mandarinia. (Courtesy of WSU)
Screen shot of the life cycle that appears in the WSU Extension fact sheet on the Asian giant hornet, Vespa mandarinia. (Courtesy of WSU)

Screen shot of the life cycle that appears in the WSU Extension fact sheet on the Asian giant hornet, Vespa mandarinia. (Courtesy of WSU)

Posted on Thursday, August 6, 2020 at 2:13 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Economic Development, Environment, Health, Innovation, Pest Management

This Is Not Our Planet. Whose Planet Is It?

A honey bee encounters a lady beetle, aka ladybug, on mustard. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Mention "beetles," and most folks think of that iconic English rock band from Liverpool. You know, John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison and...

A honey bee encounters a lady beetle, aka ladybug, on mustard. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A honey bee encounters a lady beetle, aka ladybug, on mustard. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee encounters a lady beetle, aka ladybug, on mustard. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A cellar spider catches and wraps a lady beetle, aka ladybug. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A cellar spider catches and wraps a lady beetle, aka ladybug. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A cellar spider catches and wraps a lady beetle, aka ladybug. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Gulf Fritillary eyes a blister beetle on a Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A Gulf Fritillary eyes a blister beetle on a Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Gulf Fritillary eyes a blister beetle on a Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, August 3, 2020 at 2:28 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Economic Development, Environment, Innovation, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

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