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Posts Tagged: Katharina Ullmann

Free Webinars: Think of the ABCs in Pollination of Specialty Crops

Think of the ABCs: almonds, blueberries and cherries. Then think of watermelons and pumpkins. All those crops will be discussed in a series of free...


"A" is for almonds. A honey bee pollinating an almond blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

"A" is for almonds. A honey bee pollinating an almond blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)


"B" is for blueberries. This is the result of bee pollination. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

"B" is for blueberries. This is the result of bee pollination. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)


"C" is for cherries. A honey bee pollinating a cherry blossom.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

"C" is for cherries. A honey bee pollinating a cherry blossom.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, January 18, 2017 at 5:03 PM

Clear the Calendar for the 2016 Pollinator Conference!

A yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, foraging on a tower of jewels, Echium wildpretii. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It's never too early to think about the pollinators. We're glad to see that the Center for Pollinator Research at Penn State University will host...

A yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, foraging on a tower of jewels, Echium wildpretii. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, foraging on a tower of jewels, Echium wildpretii. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, foraging on a tower of jewels, Echium wildpretii. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Pollination ecologist Neal Williams, associate professor of entomology at UC Davis, is one of the conference organizers. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Pollination ecologist Neal Williams, associate professor of entomology at UC Davis, is one of the conference organizers. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Pollination ecologist Neal Williams, associate professor of entomology at UC Davis, is one of the conference organizers. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, July 9, 2015 at 5:53 PM

You Can Take That to the Bank!

Sunflower bees, Svastra obliqua expurgata, flying to a nesting area in downtown Davis, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

They're good bees. You can take that to the bank! The excitement began when Martin Guerena, an integrated pest management (IPM) specialist with the...

Sunflower bees, Svastra obliqua expurgata, flying to a nesting area in downtown Davis, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Sunflower bees, Svastra obliqua expurgata, flying to a nesting area in downtown Davis, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Sunflower bees, Svastra obliqua expurgata, flying to a nesting area in downtown Davis, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A sunflower bee delivering pollen to its nest. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A sunflower bee delivering pollen to its nest. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A sunflower bee delivering pollen to its nest. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A pollen-packing sunflower bee making a deposit near a Davis bank. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A pollen-packing sunflower bee making a deposit near a Davis bank. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A pollen-packing sunflower bee making a deposit near a Davis bank. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Lindsey Hack (left) and  Allie Margulies of the Neal Williams lab, UC Davis, photographing the sunflower bees. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Lindsey Hack (left) and Allie Margulies of the Neal Williams lab, UC Davis, photographing the sunflower bees. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Lindsey Hack (left) and Allie Margulies of the Neal Williams lab, UC Davis, photographing the sunflower bees. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

People make deposits in this bank, but sunflower bees are making deposits near the bank (left, in the wood chip mulch, circled here by yellow caution tape). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
People make deposits in this bank, but sunflower bees are making deposits near the bank (left, in the wood chip mulch, circled here by yellow caution tape). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

People make deposits in this bank, but sunflower bees are making deposits near the bank (left, in the wood chip mulch, circled here by yellow caution tape). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, July 2, 2015 at 6:08 PM

All About Crop Pollination

Katharina Ullmann, who just received her doctorate in entomology from UC Davis and is now a pollinator conservation specialist for the Xerces Society, is co-coordinator of the workshop. (Photo by Neal Williams)

What's stressing our honey bees and how are they impacted? You'll learn more about honey bees if you attend the Crop Pollination Workshop next...

Katharina Ullmann, who just received her doctorate in entomology from UC Davis and is now a pollinator conservation specialist for the Xerces Society, is co-coordinator of the workshop. (Photo by Neal Williams)
Katharina Ullmann, who just received her doctorate in entomology from UC Davis and is now a pollinator conservation specialist for the Xerces Society, is co-coordinator of the workshop. (Photo by Neal Williams)

Katharina Ullmann, who just received her doctorate in entomology from UC Davis and is now a pollinator conservation specialist for the Xerces Society, is co-coordinator of the workshop. (Photo by Neal Williams)

Posted on Thursday, January 15, 2015 at 9:10 PM

Why the Squash Bee Is Important

Squash bee, Peponapis pruinosa, on a squash blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Peponapis pruinosa isn't your common household word. But among the people who study pollinators, it is. Also known as a squash bee, it is an...

Squash bee, Peponapis pruinosa, on a squash blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Squash bee, Peponapis pruinosa, on a squash blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Squash bee, Peponapis pruinosa, on a squash blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The squash bee, Peponapis pruinosa, is a specialist, pollinating only the Cucurbita genus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The squash bee, Peponapis pruinosa, is a specialist, pollinating only the Cucurbita genus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The squash bee, Peponapis pruinosa, is a specialist, pollinating only the Cucurbita genus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, June 2, 2014 at 10:09 PM
 
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