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Posts Tagged: Jackson Audley

Jackson Audley: Targeting the Walnut Twig Beetle

The walnut twig beetle is about the size of a grain of rice. In  association with the fungus, Geosmithia morbida, it causes the insect-pathogen complex known as

Doctoral candidate and forest entomologist Jackson Audley of the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology, targets an invasive bark beetle...

The walnut twig beetle is about the size of a grain of rice. In  association with the fungus, Geosmithia morbida, it causes the insect-pathogen complex known as
The walnut twig beetle is about the size of a grain of rice. In association with the fungus, Geosmithia morbida, it causes the insect-pathogen complex known as "thousand cankers disease." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The walnut twig beetle is about the size of a grain of rice. In association with the fungus, Geosmithia morbida, it causes the insect-pathogen complex known as "thousand cankers disease." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, December 2, 2019 at 5:28 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Economic Development, Environment, Innovation, Pest Management

UC Davis Doctoral Student Jackson Audley: On the Road to Improve Forest Health

Jackson Audley (left) with major professor Steve Seybold in front of a dying black walnut tree on E St. in Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Forest health promises to take a turn for the better, thanks to forest entomologists like Jackson Audley, a doctoral student at the University of...

Jackson Audley (left) with major professor Steve Seybold in front of a dying black walnut tree on E St. in Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Jackson Audley (left) with major professor Steve Seybold in front of a dying black walnut tree on E St. in Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Jackson Audley (left) with major professor Steve Seybold in front of a dying black walnut tree on E St. in Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, May 31, 2019 at 3:20 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Environment, Health, Natural Resources, Pest Management

A Sign of the Times: Why This Black Walnut Tree Is Dying

Forest entomologists Steve Seybold (right) and Jackson Audley stand by a 150-year-old black walnut tree on the 100 block of E Street. It is dying of thousand cankers disease. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

If you've ever walked into the courtyard on the 100 block of E Street in downtown Davis, Calif., you've probably noticed the massive black walnut...

Forest entomologists Steve Seybold (right) and Jackson Audley stand by a 150-year-old black walnut tree on the 100 block of E Street. It is dying of thousand cankers disease. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Forest entomologists Steve Seybold (right) and Jackson Audley stand by a 150-year-old black walnut tree on the 100 block of E Street. It is dying of thousand cankers disease. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Forest entomologists Steve Seybold (right) and Jackson Audley stand by a 150-year-old black walnut tree on the 100 block of E Street. It is dying of thousand cankers disease. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Walnut twig beetles tunnel into branches and trunks of walnut (Juglans) where they create galleries for mating and reproduction. In association with a canker producing fungus, Tthey cause a disease known as thousand cankers disease. This tree is in downtown Davis, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Walnut twig beetles tunnel into branches and trunks of walnut (Juglans) where they create galleries for mating and reproduction. In association with a canker producing fungus, Tthey cause a disease known as thousand cankers disease. This tree is in downtown Davis, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Walnut twig beetles tunnel into branches and trunks of walnut (Juglans) where they create galleries for mating and reproduction. In association with a canker producing fungus, Tthey cause a disease known as thousand cankers disease. This tree is in downtown Davis, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This massive, 150-year-old black walnut tree on the 100 block of E Street, Davis, is dying of thousand cankers disease. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
This massive, 150-year-old black walnut tree on the 100 block of E Street, Davis, is dying of thousand cankers disease. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This massive, 150-year-old black walnut tree on the 100 block of E Street, Davis, is dying of thousand cankers disease. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, May 24, 2019 at 5:00 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Environment, Innovation, Natural Resources, Pest Management

Bugs and Beat: Talented UC Davis Graduate Students Form Insect-Themed Band

Yao-“Fruit-Fly”-Cai has been playing drums since age 17. (Photos by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

If you missed hearing The Entomology Band performing in front of Briggs Hall during the recent UC Davis Picnic Day, not to worry. They're featured...

Yao-“Fruit-Fly”-Cai has been playing drums since age 17. (Photos by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Yao-“Fruit-Fly”-Cai has been playing drums since age 17. (Photos by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Yao-“Fruit-Fly”-Cai has been playing drums since age 17. (Photos by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The Entomology Band performing in front of Briggs Hall. From left are Jill Oberski, Zach Griebenow, Brendon Boudinot, Yao Cai, Wei Lin, Jackson Audley and Christine Tabuloc.
The Entomology Band performing in front of Briggs Hall. From left are Jill Oberski, Zach Griebenow, Brendon Boudinot, Yao Cai, Wei Lin, Jackson Audley and Christine Tabuloc.

The Entomology Band performing in front of Briggs Hall. From left are Jill Oberski, Zach Griebenow, Brendon Boudinot, Yao Cai, Wei Lin, Jackson Audley and Christine Tabuloc.

Group photo: In front is Yao Cai. The three in the second row are (from left) Jill Oberski, Brendon Boudinot and Christine Tabuloc. In back (from left) are Zachary Griebenow, Jackson Audley and Wei Lin.
Group photo: In front is Yao Cai. The three in the second row are (from left) Jill Oberski, Brendon Boudinot and Christine Tabuloc. In back (from left) are Zachary Griebenow, Jackson Audley and Wei Lin.

Group photo: In front is Yao Cai. The three in the second row are (from left) Jill Oberski, Brendon Boudinot and Christine Tabuloc. In back (from left) are Zachary Griebenow, Jackson Audley and Wei Lin.

Posted on Tuesday, July 3, 2018 at 5:00 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Family, Natural Resources, Pest Management

Jackson Audley: A Case Study with the Walnut Twig Beetle

The walnut twig beetle is about the size of a grain of rice. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

So tiny and so destructive. It's about the size of a grain of rice but it's a killer. That's the walnut twig beetle, Pityophthorus juglandis, which...

The walnut twig beetle is about the size of a grain of rice. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The walnut twig beetle is about the size of a grain of rice. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The walnut twig beetle is about the size of a grain of rice. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

 
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