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Posts Tagged: Independence Day

Independence Day for a Monarch

The monarch chrysalis bulges, a sure sign that eclosure is imminent. At right is a newly formed green chrysalis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Have you ever seen a monarch butterfly eclose? It's a magical moment. First an egg, then a caterpillar, then a chrysalis, and then a butterfly,...

The monarch chrysalis bulges, a sure sign that eclosure is imminent. At right is a newly formed green chrysalis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The monarch chrysalis bulges, a sure sign that eclosure is imminent. At right is a newly formed green chrysalis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The monarch chrysalis bulges, a sure sign that eclosure is imminent. At right is a newly formed green chrysalis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Out it slides. Swoosh! (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Out it slides. Swoosh! (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Out it slides. Swoosh! (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Time to wiggle around. Welcome to the world! (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Time to wiggle around. Welcome to the world! (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Time to wiggle around. Welcome to the world! (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Time to pump up the wings. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Time to pump up the wings. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Time to pump up the wings. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Just you wait, soon I'll be a familiar looking butterfly. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Just you wait, soon I'll be a familiar looking butterfly. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Just you wait, soon I'll be a familiar looking butterfly. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

I'm  swinging and swaying. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
I'm swinging and swaying. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

I'm swinging and swaying. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ah, as soon as I dry, I'll be off and long gone. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Ah, as soon as I dry, I'll be off and long gone. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ah, as soon as I dry, I'll be off and long gone. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, July 4, 2018 at 10:54 AM
Focus Area Tags: Innovation Natural Resources

Happy Independence Day!

A newly eclosed female monarch butterfly, Danaus plexippus,  touches down on an American flag. Another star. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Today we celebrate the Fourth of July, also known as Independence Day. History books tell us that on July 4, 1776, the Continental Congress adopted...

A newly eclosed female monarch butterfly, Danaus plexippus,  touches down on an American flag. Another star. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A newly eclosed female monarch butterfly, Danaus plexippus, touches down on an American flag. Another star. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A newly eclosed female monarch butterfly, Danaus plexippus, touches down on an American flag. Another star. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, July 4, 2016 at 9:30 AM

Hurray for the Red, White and Blue!

Hurray for the red, white and blue! One more day until we celebrate the birth of our country, Independence Day, and the patriotic colors will be out...


"Red" is for the red flameskimmer, Libellula saturata. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey).

"Red" is for the red flameskimmer, Libellula saturata. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey).


"White" is for the cabbage white butterfly, Pieris rapae. It's a pest, but its colors are appropriate on Independence Day. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

"White" is for the cabbage white butterfly, Pieris rapae. It's a pest, but its colors are appropriate on Independence Day. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)


"Blue" is for Acmon Blue (Plebejus acmon) butterfly. It's as blue as the starry background on the American flag. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

"Blue" is for Acmon Blue (Plebejus acmon) butterfly. It's as blue as the starry background on the American flag. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, July 3, 2015 at 4:26 PM

Independence Day Plant

Happy Independence Day to all, with a special thank you to all of those who made our Independence possible!  It is a great day to celebrate our freedom, and one of my favorite ways to mark an occasion such as this is by planting something special in my garden.  You’re in luck, as I know just the plant!

A few years ago, I found a beautiful plant at a nursery-a Shooting Star hydrangea, Hydrangea macrophylla ‘Hanabi’.  This is a lace cap hydrangea of pure white, double, flattened flower heads shaped like a star.  Very much like fireworks in your own garden!  Like any hydrangea, you’ll need to plant it so that it is shaded from the hot sun and drying winds.  They require frequent watering to keep it lush and beautiful, so you don’t want it to dry out.  Plant in a slightly acidic soil that offers good drainage (if you have clay soil, you’ll want to keep it amended with compost).  After 4 years, my plant is about 3’ tall and wide.  However, they can grow to about 5’, so be sure to give it room to breathe and grow.

So go out and find a shooting star hydrangea and plant it to honor our forefathers!

Hydrangea macrophylla 'Hanabi' (photo from aquiya.skr.jp)
Hydrangea macrophylla 'Hanabi' (photo from aquiya.skr.jp)

Posted on Wednesday, July 4, 2012 at 4:25 PM
 
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