Capitol Corridor
University of California
Capitol Corridor

Posts Tagged: Hopland

Coming Oct. 7: A Tour of Kate Frey's Bee-utiful Garden

This is the Hopland home of Kate and Ben Frey, featuring gardens by Kate and rustic structures and whimsical art by Ben. (Photo by Kate Frey)

"When's the next public tour of Kate Frey's garden?" That's a question we're often asked and now we have an answer: Saturday, Oct. 7. World-class...

This is the Hopland home of Kate and Ben Frey, featuring gardens by Kate and rustic structures and whimsical art by Ben. (Photo by Kate Frey)
This is the Hopland home of Kate and Ben Frey, featuring gardens by Kate and rustic structures and whimsical art by Ben. (Photo by Kate Frey)

This is the Hopland home of Kate and Ben Frey, featuring gardens by Kate and rustic structures and whimsical art by Ben. (Photo by Kate Frey)

A bumble bee and honey bee share teasel in the Frey gardens. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A bumble bee and honey bee share teasel in the Frey gardens. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A bumble bee and honey bee share teasel in the Frey gardens. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

An inviting path in the Frey gardens. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
An inviting path in the Frey gardens. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

An inviting path in the Frey gardens. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, October 4, 2017 at 5:07 PM

Caging kids! The next generation of wildlife biologists

Mikayla McWilliams shows a tiny frog at the Sustainable You Summer Camp, UC Hopland Research and Extension Center.

As 10-year-old Dominic Vargas crouched on the ground, in a cage not much larger than himself, trying to forage for tasty treats (candy) on the woodland floor...CRASH! The cage door came falling down and he realized that he had inadvertently tripped a tiny fishing line in his efforts to reach that candy - he was now trapped. Dominic seemed to accept his fate with good humor, shrugging, smiling and getting to work on that candy. Wildlife biologist, Jessie Roughgarden, commented that Dominic will now be collared, tagged and measured before returning him to the wild ... or in this case his parents.

This seemingly terrifying experience is in fact all part of the new "Sustainable You - 4-H Summer Camp" held at the UC Hopland Research and Extension Center. Sustainable You is a five-day camp allowing students to experience science and nature while learning about ways in which to conserve the land, water, air and energy.

View Dominic's experience in this 44-second video:

The camp is conducted at three of the UC Agriculture and Natural Resources' Research and Extension Centers across the state and each center tweaks the curriculum to suit their landscape and the kinds of research conducted at their sites. At Hopland this means getting the chance to meet with wildlife biologists from the UC Berkeley "Brashares Lab," led by professor Justin Brashares. It's an amazing opportunity for these kids to meet and ask questions of scientists conducting experiments in the countryside that surrounds them. Dominic may not be collared, but more than 10 deer on the property went through the same experience last week (minus the candy) as they were carefully captured by researchers and fitted with collars to better understand their movements and population across the 5,358-acre center.

The young team of scientists enjoying summer camp were also working to understand what wildlife shares the landscape with them by setting wildlife cameras daily and improving their positioning and locations each day. Advice from Brashares and Jessie Roughgarden helped the students improve their chance of catching footage of raccoons, foxes and maybe even a mountain lion. Day one  produced fox video footage and shots of raccoons feeling around in the last pools of creek water to catch some of the tiny young frogs currently in residence.

Hear what Ahmae saw on her wildlife camera in the 59-second video below:

A raccoon captured on one of the wildlife cameras set up by campers.

Exposure for these kids not only to hands-on activities exploring sustainability, but also to wildlife biologists, young researchers and professors working on today's wildlife and land management challenges, gives them an open door to explore their own future careers and interests.

Local Americorps watershed steward Alejandara Prendergast disects a salmon with campers

As 9-year-old Ahmae Munday so sweetly put it, when asked what her favorite part of the Sustainable You Summer Camp was, "Everything! Especially the cameras."

The UC ANR network of Research and Extension Centers provide the perfect location to offer exposure to youth and communities to better understand and interact with the science going on in their own back yards and to inspire the next generation of researchers - as camp attendee and scholarship recipient Kaiden Stalnaker described in his scholarship application, "When I grow up I dream of a career in science and your camp would be a boost in the right direction."

Thanks to the researchers, camp counselors and students who have allowed the Sustainable You summer camp to inspire young people like Kaiden.

Campers enjoy a woodland hike and discover slender salamanders and a discarded lizard skin.
 
Posted on Monday, July 17, 2017 at 9:19 AM

Bee Friendly, Bee Happy and Bee Healthy

A bumble bee and a honey bee sharing teasel in the Kate and Ben Frey Garden, Hopland, Mendocino County. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Sometimes when you walk through a bee garden, you feel Mother Nature tugging at your arm, pulling you from one breathtaking area to another. You...

A bumble bee and a honey bee sharing teasel in the Kate and Ben Frey Garden, Hopland, Mendocino County. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A bumble bee and a honey bee sharing teasel in the Kate and Ben Frey Garden, Hopland, Mendocino County. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A bumble bee and a honey bee sharing teasel in the Kate and Ben Frey Garden, Hopland, Mendocino County. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The lovely garden at the home of Kate and Ben Frey in Hopland.
The lovely garden at the home of Kate and Ben Frey in Hopland.

The lovely garden at the home of Kate and Ben Frey in Hopland.

Rounding a corner in the Kate and Ben Frey garden at their home in Hopland, Calif. Ben installed the drip irrigation system in the one-acre garden.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Rounding a corner in the Kate and Ben Frey garden at their home in Hopland, Calif. Ben installed the drip irrigation system in the one-acre garden.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Rounding a corner in the Kate and Ben Frey garden at their home in Hopland, Calif. Ben installed the drip irrigation system in the one-acre garden.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Kate Frey serves as a consultant for the pollinator gardens (shown) at the Lynmar Estate Winery, Sebastopol.
Kate Frey serves as a consultant for the pollinator gardens (shown) at the Lynmar Estate Winery, Sebastopol.

Kate Frey serves as a consultant for the pollinator gardens (shown) at the Lynmar Estate Winery, Sebastopol.

Another view of the pollinator gardens at Lynmar Estate Winery, Sebastopol. Kate Frey serves as the consultant.
Another view of the pollinator gardens at Lynmar Estate Winery, Sebastopol. Kate Frey serves as the consultant.

Another view of the pollinator gardens at Lynmar Estate Winery, Sebastopol. Kate Frey serves as the consultant.

Posted on Thursday, June 9, 2016 at 3:54 PM

'Green' educational center construction well underway

All the 'rough work' has been completed at the Shippey Educational Center.
Construction on the Shippey Educational Center at the UC Hopland Research and Extension Center in Ukiah is in full swing, reported Carole Brodsky in the Ukiah Daily Journal.

The lengthy article said ground was broken in October, and the facility is projected to be completed in the fall. 

"We've been a research and extension center since 1951, but have been primarily focused on research, without a strong extension component," said Hopland director Robert Timm. "Farm advisors in the extension office handle the bulk of the outreach. We've needed a facility that could handle larger meetings and address educational and outreach components of our extension programs. We'd hold meetings in a crowded warehouse and hope the weather would cooperate. It took several years, but this project finally rose to the top of the list."

The building is named for the late Rod Shippey, a UC Cooperative Extension advisor from 1955 to 1989.

Among the "green" components of the new facility are:

  • Rainwater catchment for flush toilets
  • Radiant floor heating
  • Solar panels for hot water generation
  • On-site wastewater treatment
  • Passive heating and cooling elements
  • 'Woodpecker-friendly' siding

Future plans for the building include:

  • Site-built photovoltaics
  • A solar thermal system
  • Utilization of green furniture and cabinetry
  • Outdoor meeting "terraces"
  • Food composting stations
  • Creation of a wetland pond

Parking will be near, but not next to the building, the article said. Attendees will traverse a gentle trail to the facility, emphasizing the connectedness to the land and creating an organic transition from car to countryside.

Posted on Wednesday, May 9, 2012 at 8:51 AM
Tags: Hopland (4), Robert Timm (5)
 
E-mail
 
Webmaster Email: kmchurchill@ucanr.edu