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Posts Tagged: Emily Meineke

Amanda Koltz Seminar: Species Interactions and Global Change

Global change ecologist Amanda Koltz, a senior scientist with the Department of Biology, Washington University, St. Louis, will present a virtual seminar, hosted by the UC Davis Department of Entomology, on Oct. 14.

"It's important to consider species interactions in efforts to understand ecosystem responses to global change." So says global change...

Global change ecologist Amanda Koltz, a senior scientist with the Department of Biology, Washington University, St. Louis, will present a virtual seminar, hosted by the UC Davis Department of Entomology, on Oct. 14.
Global change ecologist Amanda Koltz, a senior scientist with the Department of Biology, Washington University, St. Louis, will present a virtual seminar, hosted by the UC Davis Department of Entomology, on Oct. 14.

Global change ecologist Amanda Koltz, a senior scientist with the Department of Biology, Washington University, St. Louis, will present a virtual seminar, hosted by the UC Davis Department of Entomology, on Oct. 14.

Posted on Friday, October 9, 2020 at 4:41 PM
Focus Area Tags: Economic Development, Environment, Innovation, Natural Resources

Meet Emily Meineke, New UC Davis Urban Landscape Entomologist

These redhumped caterpillars, to become  moths, Schizura concinna, family Notodontidae, are dining on the leaf of a  Western redbud, (Cercis occidentalis) in Vacaville, Calif. Emily Meineke, newest faculty member of the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology, studies how climate change and urban development affect insects, plants, and how they interact with one another. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

While you're sheltering in place due to the coronavirus pandemic precautions, not too many people are aware of a new faculty member in the UC Davis...

These redhumped caterpillars, to become  moths, Schizura concinna, family Notodontidae, are dining on the leaf of a  Western redbud, (Cercis occidentalis) in Vacaville, Calif. Emily Meineke, newest faculty member of the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology, studies how climate change and urban development affect insects, plants, and how they interact with one another. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
These redhumped caterpillars, to become moths, Schizura concinna, family Notodontidae, are dining on the leaf of a Western redbud, (Cercis occidentalis) in Vacaville, Calif. Emily Meineke, newest faculty member of the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology, studies how climate change and urban development affect insects, plants, and how they interact with one another. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

These redhumped caterpillars, to become moths, Schizura concinna, family Notodontidae, are dining on the leaf of a Western redbud, (Cercis occidentalis) in Vacaville, Calif. Emily Meineke, newest faculty member of the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology, studies how climate change and urban development affect insects, plants, and how they interact with one another. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, March 24, 2020 at 4:29 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Economic Development, Environment, Innovation, Natural Resources, Pest Management, Yard & Garden
 
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