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Posts Tagged: California Bees and Blooms

The Beauty of the Bee

A honey bee nectaring on African blue basil in Vacaville, Calif. At right is Salvia microphylla

Have you ever pulled up a chair in your garden and watched honey bees foraging? They are so intent on their "bees-ness" that they don't know you're...

A honey bee nectaring on African blue basil in Vacaville, Calif. At right is Salvia microphylla
A honey bee nectaring on African blue basil in Vacaville, Calif. At right is Salvia microphylla "Hot Lips." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee nectaring on African blue basil in Vacaville, Calif. At right is Salvia microphylla "Hot Lips." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The honey bee, its tongue or proboscis still extended, departs from the African blue basil.  (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The honey bee, its tongue or proboscis still extended, departs from the African blue basil. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The honey bee, its tongue or proboscis still extended, departs from the African blue basil. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The honey bee pulls its proboscis back in and is leaving the African blue basil. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The honey bee pulls its proboscis back in and is leaving the African blue basil. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The honey bee pulls its proboscis back in and is leaving the African blue basil. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Frozen in time--a honey bee takes flight and heads for home. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Frozen in time--a honey bee takes flight and heads for home. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Frozen in time--a honey bee takes flight and heads for home. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, September 17, 2020 at 4:26 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Economic Development, Environment, Food, Innovation, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

Nighty-Night, Mr. Bumble Bee!

A male yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, sleeps on a Mexican sunflower,Bombus Bombus vosnesenskii,in Vacaville,Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Have you ever seen a bumble bee sleeping? If you slip out to your garden at night or early morning, you might find the male bumble bees asleep in,...

A male yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, sleeps on a Mexican sunflower,Bombus Bombus vosnesenskii,in Vacaville,Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A male yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, sleeps on a Mexican sunflower,Bombus Bombus vosnesenskii,in Vacaville,Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A male yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, sleeps on a Mexican sunflower,Bombus Bombus vosnesenskii,in Vacaville,Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This sleeping male yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, clings to lavender. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
This sleeping male yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, clings to lavender. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This sleeping male yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, clings to lavender. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Holding tight is this sleeping male yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, clutching a lavender stem. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Holding tight is this sleeping male yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, clutching a lavender stem. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Holding tight is this sleeping male yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, clutching a lavender stem. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, July 20, 2020 at 5:05 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Environment, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

Remembering the Legendary Robbin Thorp

Robbin Thorp, distinguished emeritus professor of entomology, with Franklin's bumble bee, a bee he had been monitoring since 1998. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

We cannot imagine a world without Dr. Robbin Thorp. The distinguished emeritus professor of entomology at the University of California, Davis--he...

Robbin Thorp, distinguished emeritus professor of entomology, with Franklin's bumble bee, a bee he had been monitoring since 1998. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Robbin Thorp, distinguished emeritus professor of entomology, with Franklin's bumble bee, a bee he had been monitoring since 1998. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Robbin Thorp, distinguished emeritus professor of entomology, with Franklin's bumble bee, a bee he had been monitoring since 1998. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Co-instructor Robbin Thorp (far right, yellow shirt) at a recent Bee Course, sponsored by the American Museum of Natural History.
Co-instructor Robbin Thorp (far right, yellow shirt) at a recent Bee Course, sponsored by the American Museum of Natural History.

Co-instructor Robbin Thorp (far right, yellow shirt) at a recent Bee Course, sponsored by the American Museum of Natural History.

Robbin Thorp was a frequent docent at the Bohart Museum of Entomology where he also did research. This image was taken April 20, 2013. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Robbin Thorp was a frequent docent at the Bohart Museum of Entomology where he also did research. This image was taken April 20, 2013. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Robbin Thorp was a frequent docent at the Bohart Museum of Entomology where he also did research. This image was taken April 20, 2013. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Global bee authority Robbin Thorp with two of the books he co-authored in 2014. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Global bee authority Robbin Thorp with two of the books he co-authored in 2014. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Global bee authority Robbin Thorp with two of the books he co-authored in 2014. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Robbin Thorp, a familiar figure in the spring, wearing his vest and trademark hat, and standing in front of a blossoming almond tree on Bee Biology Road, UC Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Robbin Thorp, a familiar figure in the spring, wearing his vest and trademark hat, and standing in front of a blossoming almond tree on Bee Biology Road, UC Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Robbin Thorp, a familiar figure in the spring, wearing his vest and trademark hat, and standing in front of a blossoming almond tree on Bee Biology Road, UC Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This is the male Valley carpenter bee, Xylocopa varipuncta, a species that Robbin Thorp showed often at the Bohart Museum of Entomology and at other presentations. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
This is the male Valley carpenter bee, Xylocopa varipuncta, a species that Robbin Thorp showed often at the Bohart Museum of Entomology and at other presentations. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This is the male Valley carpenter bee, Xylocopa varipuncta, a species that Robbin Thorp showed often at the Bohart Museum of Entomology and at other presentations. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, June 7, 2019 at 5:16 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Environment, Innovation, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

Valley Carpenter Bees: Drama in the Garden

Don't bug me, I'm trying to wake up. This female Valley carpenter bee, Xylocopa varipuncta, peers over a blue spike salvia (Salvia uliginosa) blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Some folks call them "bumble bees," but they're not. In size, the female Valley carpenter bee (Xylocopa varipuncta) resembles a bumble bee, but...

Don't bug me, I'm trying to wake up. This female Valley carpenter bee, Xylocopa varipuncta, peers over a blue spike salvia (Salvia uliginosa) blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Don't bug me, I'm trying to wake up. This female Valley carpenter bee, Xylocopa varipuncta, peers over a blue spike salvia (Salvia uliginosa) blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Don't bug me, I'm trying to wake up. This female Valley carpenter bee, Xylocopa varipuncta, peers over a blue spike salvia (Salvia uliginosa) blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The female Valley carpenter bee sips nectar from a blue spike salvia, Salvia uliginosa. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The female Valley carpenter bee sips nectar from a blue spike salvia, Salvia uliginosa. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The female Valley carpenter bee sips nectar from a blue spike salvia, Salvia uliginosa. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The metallic wings of the female Valley carpenter bee gleam in the sun as she sips nectar from gold coin, Asteriscus maritimus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The metallic wings of the female Valley carpenter bee gleam in the sun as she sips nectar from gold coin, Asteriscus maritimus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The metallic wings of the female Valley carpenter bee gleam in the sun as she sips nectar from gold coin, Asteriscus maritimus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This is the male Valley carpenter, Xylocopa varipuncta,  bee on germander. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
This is the male Valley carpenter, Xylocopa varipuncta, bee on germander. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This is the male Valley carpenter, Xylocopa varipuncta, bee on germander. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, September 14, 2018 at 6:17 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Yard & Garden

What's Not to Love About 'Boys' Night Out'?

Longhorned bees--Melissodes (possibly M. robustior) slumbering on a Mexican sunflower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

We look forward to "The Boys' Night Out." Ah, pillow fights, popcorn, and marathon movies on TV, you ask? No. "Boys' Night Out" is when the...

Longhorned bees--Melissodes (possibly M. robustior) slumbering on a Mexican sunflower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Longhorned bees--Melissodes (possibly M. robustior) slumbering on a Mexican sunflower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Longhorned bees--Melissodes (possibly M. robustior) slumbering on a Mexican sunflower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Is it time to wake up? Two male longhorned bees eye the photographer. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Is it time to wake up? Two male longhorned bees eye the photographer. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Is it time to wake up? Two male longhorned bees eye the photographer. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A male longhorned bee, Melissodes, prepares to leave his
A male longhorned bee, Melissodes, prepares to leave his "bedroom," a Mexican sunflower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A male longhorned bee, Melissodes, prepares to leave his "bedroom," a Mexican sunflower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This male longhorned bee is sleeping alone on a Mexican sunflower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
This male longhorned bee is sleeping alone on a Mexican sunflower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This male longhorned bee is sleeping alone on a Mexican sunflower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, August 15, 2018 at 4:41 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

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