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Posts Tagged: Bug Squad

Saving a Butterfly: In a World Where Kindness Matters

Newly eclosed anise swallowtail, Papilio zelicaon. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It was a long awaited process, but it's a girl! And she's beautiful! It all began with finding two anise swallowtail chrysalids clinging last July...

Newly eclosed anise swallowtail, Papilio zelicaon. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Newly eclosed anise swallowtail, Papilio zelicaon. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Newly eclosed anise swallowtail, Papilio zelicaon. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Newly eclosed anise swallowtail, Papilio zelicaon, ready to take flight. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Newly eclosed anise swallowtail, Papilio zelicaon, ready to take flight. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Newly eclosed anise swallowtail, Papilio zelicaon, ready to take flight. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, July 16, 2018 at 3:39 PM

Everybody Loves Bugs, Right? Here Are the Top 25 Bug Blogs in the World

A flameskimmer dragonfly, Libellula saturata, perches on a bamboo stake in Vacaville, Calif. Native to western North America, it belongs to the family Libellulidae. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Everybody loves bugs, right? Well, no, they don't. Some folks scream, smash them, or sprint away from them. Other folks--including yours...

A flameskimmer dragonfly, Libellula saturata, perches on a bamboo stake in Vacaville, Calif. Native to western North America, it belongs to the family Libellulidae. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A flameskimmer dragonfly, Libellula saturata, perches on a bamboo stake in Vacaville, Calif. Native to western North America, it belongs to the family Libellulidae. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A flameskimmer dragonfly, Libellula saturata, perches on a bamboo stake in Vacaville, Calif. Native to western North America, it belongs to the family Libellulidae. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-up of the flameskimmer dragonfly, also called a
Close-up of the flameskimmer dragonfly, also called a "firecracker skimmer." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-up of the flameskimmer dragonfly, also called a "firecracker skimmer." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Flameskimmer in flight as he heads back to his perch, a bamboo stake. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Flameskimmer in flight as he heads back to his perch, a bamboo stake. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Flameskimmer in flight as he heads back to his perch, a bamboo stake. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

'Bug Squad' blog recognized among 'Top 50'

The University of California Bug Squad blog, written by Kathy Keatley Garvey of the UC Davis Department of Entomology, has been named one of the "Best 50 Insect Blogs" by the website OnlineCourses.net.

"Bugs are like certain people in your life: you can't live with them, you can't live without them," the website says. "Hence this listing of the Web's best bug-related blogs. You'll find sites on the battle of the birds and the bees and a ton of info on what makes insects so unique to our planet."

Garvey noted that everyone has "top lists" nowadays - top 10 superfoods, top 10 things to do, top 10 places to go, bucket lists, etc. Perhaps creating such a list is nothing more than a marketing ploy, but it is recognition, nonetheless.

OnlineCourses.net said Bug Squad brings a sharp and crisp, almost journalistic focus to the bug blogosphere.

"We were particularly interested in their coverage of the Bring Your Own Bug movement," the website said.

It wasn't mentioned by OnlineCourses, but I believe Bug Squad's numerous, high quality photos of insects, especially bees, is one of the things that sets it apart.

Congratulations to Bug Squad.

Honey bee on Cape Mellow from Kathy Keatley Garvey's Bug Squad blog.
Honey bee on Cape Mellow from Kathy Keatley Garvey's Bug Squad blog.

Posted on Friday, February 4, 2011 at 8:56 AM
 
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