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Posts Tagged: Buddleia

Where Are You, Gulf Fritillaries?

A Gulf Fritillary shares a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia) with a hover fly (Syrphid). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Where are you, Gulf Fritillaries? The Gulf Fritillary (Agraulis vanillae) population seems to be diminishing this year around Solano and Yolo...

A Gulf Fritillary shares a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia) with a hover fly (Syrphid). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A Gulf Fritillary shares a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia) with a hover fly (Syrphid). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Gulf Fritillary shares a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia) with a hover fly (Syrphid). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Gulf Fritillary laying an egg on the tendril of a passionflower vine (Passiflora). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A Gulf Fritillary laying an egg on the tendril of a passionflower vine (Passiflora). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Gulf Fritillary laying an egg on the tendril of a passionflower vine (Passiflora). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-up shot of a Gulf Fritillary egg. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Close-up shot of a Gulf Fritillary egg. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-up shot of a Gulf Fritillary egg. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A very hungry Gulf Fritillary caterpillar. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A very hungry Gulf Fritillary caterpillar. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A very hungry Gulf Fritillary caterpillar. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A newly eclosed Gulf Fritillary and its chrysalis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A newly eclosed Gulf Fritillary and its chrysalis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A newly eclosed Gulf Fritillary and its chrysalis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Gulf Fritillary spreads its wings on Passiflora. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A Gulf Fritillary spreads its wings on Passiflora. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Gulf Fritillary spreads its wings on Passiflora. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Coming in on a Wing and a Prayer

A tattered monarch makes a refueling stop on a Tithonia in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

You've heard the expression, "On a wing and a prayer." It apparently originated during World War II. Remember the 1942 film,  "The Flying...

A tattered monarch makes a refueling stop on a Tithonia in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A tattered monarch makes a refueling stop on a Tithonia in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A tattered monarch makes a refueling stop on a Tithonia in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Wings are shredded and scales slashed, but this male monarch still flies. Here it pauses to soak up some sunshine. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Wings are shredded and scales slashed, but this male monarch still flies. Here it pauses to soak up some sunshine. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Wings are shredded and scales slashed, but this male monarch still flies. Here it pauses to soak up some sunshine. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A predator missed--but a miss is as good as a mile. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A predator missed--but a miss is as good as a mile. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A predator missed--but a miss is as good as a mile. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A migratory monarch, after sipping some flight fuel in Vacaville, Calif. takes off
A migratory monarch, after sipping some flight fuel in Vacaville, Calif. takes off "on a wing and a prayer," heading for an overwintering site along the coast. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A migratory monarch, after sipping some flight fuel in Vacaville, Calif. takes off "on a wing and a prayer," heading for an overwintering site along the coast. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, October 26, 2016 at 5:35 PM

A Time to Celebrate Summer and National Pollinator Week

A Western tiger swallowtail foraging on a butterfly bush, Buddleia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It's the first day of summer and the beginning of National Pollinator Week. What could be better? This: Spotting a Western tiger swallowtail...

A Western tiger swallowtail foraging on a butterfly bush, Buddleia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A Western tiger swallowtail foraging on a butterfly bush, Buddleia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Western tiger swallowtail foraging on a butterfly bush, Buddleia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Sometimes a Western tiger swallowtail resembles the brightly colored sails of a sailboat. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Sometimes a Western tiger swallowtail resembles the brightly colored sails of a sailboat. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Sometimes a Western tiger swallowtail resembles the brightly colored sails of a sailboat. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ready for take-off: the Western tiger swallowtail prepares to leave a butterfly bush. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Ready for take-off: the Western tiger swallowtail prepares to leave a butterfly bush. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ready for take-off: the Western tiger swallowtail prepares to leave a butterfly bush. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, June 20, 2016 at 5:50 PM

Good Day, Mourning Cloak

A mourning cloak, Nymphalis antiopa, as photographed Feb. 6, 2016 in the Carolee Shields White Flower Garden and Gazebo, UC Davis Arboretum. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

If you go looking for a bumble bee, you might find a butterfly. And vice versa. The UC Davis Arboretum last Saturday (Feb. 6), was just starting to...

A mourning cloak, Nymphalis antiopa, as photographed Feb. 6, 2016 in the Carolee Shields White Flower Garden and Gazebo, UC Davis Arboretum. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A mourning cloak, Nymphalis antiopa, as photographed Feb. 6, 2016 in the Carolee Shields White Flower Garden and Gazebo, UC Davis Arboretum. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A mourning cloak, Nymphalis antiopa, as photographed Feb. 6, 2016 in the Carolee Shields White Flower Garden and Gazebo, UC Davis Arboretum. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Mourning cloak touches down Feb. 6, 2016 on a butterfly bush, Buddleia
Mourning cloak touches down Feb. 6, 2016 on a butterfly bush, Buddleia "Morning Mist," in the Carolee Shields White Flower Garden and Gazebo, UC Davis Arboretum. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Mourning cloak touches down Feb. 6, 2016 on a butterfly bush, Buddleia "Morning Mist," in the Carolee Shields White Flower Garden and Gazebo, UC Davis Arboretum. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, February 8, 2016 at 2:57 PM

Butterfly Bush Rejuvenation

I’m embarrassed to reveal that if you visited my backyard, you may actually think, ”She’s a Master Gardener?”  At least that’s how I’ve been feeling, as I look at my Buddleia, more commonly known as the Butterfly Bush.  I see broken and weak branches, combined with very straggly, and unshapely growth. The good news is with just a bit of attention, I can turn this unsightly bush into a healthy, shapely, and attractive plant in my yard.  A couple minutes of pruning will guarantee you a beautiful mid-summer show of small, fragrant flowers, shaped in an arching form.  So here’s what to do…grab your pruners and begin the process called heading back.  You’re basically cutting the plant to a couple of inches off the ground, which ultimately results in dense new growth.  This early pruning helps you look at the framework of your bush without much foliage to distract you.   Due to our crazy weather, it’s possible you may already have some spring growth.  Not too worry, pruning to about 6 inches above the ground won’t hurt your plant and helps reduce the overall size of your bush, with the added benefit of increasing summer bloom.  I’ll finish by saying that if you have a spot in your yard for a Buddleia, you won’t be disappointed.  Not only does it truly attract butterflies, but it is also a low maintenance, fast-growing bush that thrives in our zone.

Butterfly bush. (photo by Mary Gabbard)
Butterfly bush. (photo by Mary Gabbard)

Posted on Saturday, March 24, 2012 at 8:53 AM
Tags: Buddleia (5), butterfly bush (13), pruning (12)
 
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