Capitol Corridor
University of California
Capitol Corridor

Posts Tagged: Bohart Museum of Entomology

Diversity of Bugs at Bohart Museum of Entomology

Butterflies from Belize are part of the global collection at the Bohart Museum of Entomology. They are (far right) Blue Morpho, Morpho helenor montezuma; (top left), a leaf mimic, Fountainea eurypyle confusa; and blue hairstreak, Pseudolycaena damao, according to entomologist Jeff Smith, who curates the Lepidoptera section. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

If diversity is the spark of life, then the Bohart Museum of Entomology is fueling that spark into a full flame. The Bohart Museum, home of nearly...

Butterflies from Belize are part of the global collection at the Bohart Museum of Entomology. They are (far right) Blue Morpho, Morpho helenor montezuma; (top left), a leaf mimic, Fountainea eurypyle confusa; and blue hairstreak, Pseudolycaena damao, according to entomologist Jeff Smith, who curates the Lepidoptera section. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Butterflies from Belize are part of the global collection at the Bohart Museum of Entomology. They are (far right) Blue Morpho, Morpho helenor montezuma; (top left), a leaf mimic, Fountainea eurypyle confusa; and blue hairstreak, Pseudolycaena damao, according to entomologist Jeff Smith, who curates the Lepidoptera section. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Butterflies from Belize are part of the global collection at the Bohart Museum of Entomology. They are (far right) Blue Morpho, Morpho helenor montezuma; (top left), a leaf mimic, Fountainea eurypyle confusa; and blue hairstreak, Pseudolycaena damao, according to entomologist Jeff Smith, who curates the Lepidoptera section. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This is part of the beetle collection at the Bohart Museum of Entomology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
This is part of the beetle collection at the Bohart Museum of Entomology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This is part of the beetle collection at the Bohart Museum of Entomology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

An Australian stick insect (walking stick) at the Bohart Museum of Entomology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
An Australian stick insect (walking stick) at the Bohart Museum of Entomology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

An Australian stick insect (walking stick) at the Bohart Museum of Entomology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Why Diversity Reigns Supreme at the UC Davis Biodiversity Museum Day

Ready for UC Davis Biodiversity Museum Day are scientists (from left) Ivana Li, biology lab manager; Lynn Kimsey, director of the Bohart Museum of Entomology; Steve Heydon, Bohart Museum senior museum scientist; Lacie Newton, doctoral student, Jason Bond lab; Brennen Dyer, lab assistant, Bohart Museum; and Rebecca Godwin, doctoral candidate, Jason Bond lab. In front is Juniper, Ivana Li's dog. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Diversity will reign supreme at the UC Davis Biodiversity Museum Day on Saturday, Feb. 15, when 13 museums or collections will be open to the public....

Ready for UC Davis Biodiversity Museum Day are scientists (from left) Ivana Li, biology lab manager; Lynn Kimsey, director of the Bohart Museum of Entomology; Steve Heydon, Bohart Museum senior museum scientist; Lacie Newton, doctoral student, Jason Bond lab; Brennen Dyer, lab assistant, Bohart Museum; and Rebecca Godwin, doctoral candidate, Jason Bond lab. In front is Juniper, Ivana Li's dog. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Ready for UC Davis Biodiversity Museum Day are scientists (from left) Ivana Li, biology lab manager; Lynn Kimsey, director of the Bohart Museum of Entomology; Steve Heydon, Bohart Museum senior museum scientist; Lacie Newton, doctoral student, Jason Bond lab; Brennen Dyer, lab assistant, Bohart Museum; and Rebecca Godwin, doctoral candidate, Jason Bond lab. In front is Juniper, Ivana Li's dog. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ready for UC Davis Biodiversity Museum Day are scientists (from left) Ivana Li, biology lab manager; Lynn Kimsey, director of the Bohart Museum of Entomology; Steve Heydon, Bohart Museum senior museum scientist; Lacie Newton, doctoral student, Jason Bond lab; Brennen Dyer, lab assistant, Bohart Museum; and Rebecca Godwin, doctoral candidate, Jason Bond lab. In front is Juniper, Ivana Li's dog. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

All aboard! The t-shirt design, by Ivana Li, shows organisms that visitors will see at the UC Davis Biodiversity Museum Day on Feb. 15. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
All aboard! The t-shirt design, by Ivana Li, shows organisms that visitors will see at the UC Davis Biodiversity Museum Day on Feb. 15. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

All aboard! The t-shirt design, by Ivana Li, shows organisms that visitors will see at the UC Davis Biodiversity Museum Day on Feb. 15. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Bombus Back in Benicia

Bombus melanopygus, the black-tailed bumble bee, nectaring on a rose in Benicia, Solano County, on Jan. 25. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

How many different bumble bee species have you seen or photographed this year? Have you seen the black-tailed bumble bee, Bombus melanopygus? It's...

Bombus melanopygus, the black-tailed bumble bee, nectaring on a rose in Benicia, Solano County, on Jan. 25. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Bombus melanopygus, the black-tailed bumble bee, nectaring on a rose in Benicia, Solano County, on Jan. 25. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Bombus melanopygus, the black-tailed bumble bee, nectaring on a rose in Benicia, Solano County, on Jan. 25. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Come on in, the pollen is fine! Bombus melanopygus, the black-tailed bumble bee, nectaring on a rose in Benicia on Jan. 25. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Come on in, the pollen is fine! Bombus melanopygus, the black-tailed bumble bee, nectaring on a rose in Benicia on Jan. 25. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Come on in, the pollen is fine! Bombus melanopygus, the black-tailed bumble bee, nectaring on a rose in Benicia on Jan. 25. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Bombus melanopygus, the black-tailed bumble bee, nectaring on a rosemary in Benicia, Solano County, on Jan. 25. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Bombus melanopygus, the black-tailed bumble bee, nectaring on a rosemary in Benicia, Solano County, on Jan. 25. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Bombus melanopygus, the black-tailed bumble bee, nectaring on a rosemary in Benicia, Solano County, on Jan. 25. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Bombus melanopygus, the black-tailed bumble bee, can't get enough of this rosemary in Benicia, Solano County, on Jan. 25. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Bombus melanopygus, the black-tailed bumble bee, can't get enough of this rosemary in Benicia, Solano County, on Jan. 25. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Bombus melanopygus, the black-tailed bumble bee, can't get enough of this rosemary in Benicia, Solano County, on Jan. 25. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Andrew Young: Natural History of Syrphids, from Pollinators to Parasitoids

A syrphid, also known as a hover fly or flower fly, nectars on a tower of jewels, Echium wildpretii, in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

At first glance, they're often mistaken for bees, but bees they are not. They're flies. You've probably seen them hovering over flowers, which is...

A syrphid, also known as a hover fly or flower fly, nectars on a tower of jewels, Echium wildpretii, in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A syrphid, also known as a hover fly or flower fly, nectars on a tower of jewels, Echium wildpretii, in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A syrphid, also known as a hover fly or flower fly, nectars on a tower of jewels, Echium wildpretii, in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A syrphid in flight, heading toward a tropical milkweed, Asclepias curassavica. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A syrphid in flight, heading toward a tropical milkweed, Asclepias curassavica. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A syrphid in flight, heading toward a tropical milkweed, Asclepias curassavica. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A syrphid tucked inside the petals of a rock purslane, Calandrinia grandiflora. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A syrphid tucked inside the petals of a rock purslane, Calandrinia grandiflora. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A syrphid tucked inside the petals of a rock purslane, Calandrinia grandiflora. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A syrphid hovers over Jupiter's Beard, Centranthus ruber. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A syrphid hovers over Jupiter's Beard, Centranthus ruber. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A syrphid hovers over Jupiter's Beard, Centranthus ruber. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Oh, for a Water Bear Sculpture at the Bohart Museum!

Lynn Kimsey, director of the Bohart Museum of Entomology, with part of the tardigrade collection. The Bohart collection includes some 25,000 slide-mounted specimens. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

If you can picture a huge water bear (tardigrade) sculpture gracing the entrance to the Bohart Museum of Entomology on Crocker Lane, UC Davis...

Lynn Kimsey, director of the Bohart Museum of Entomology, with part of the tardigrade collection. The Bohart collection includes some 25,000 slide-mounted specimens. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Lynn Kimsey, director of the Bohart Museum of Entomology, with part of the tardigrade collection. The Bohart collection includes some 25,000 slide-mounted specimens. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Lynn Kimsey, director of the Bohart Museum of Entomology, with part of the tardigrade collection. The Bohart collection includes some 25,000 slide-mounted specimens. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The Bohart collection includes some 25,000 slide-mounted specimens. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The Bohart collection includes some 25,000 slide-mounted specimens. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The Bohart collection includes some 25,000 slide-mounted specimens. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, January 31, 2020 at 4:42 PM

Next 5 stories | Last story

 
E-mail
 
Webmaster Email: kmchurchill@ucanr.edu