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Posts Tagged: Art Shapiro

A Gray Streak on the Fava Beans

A gray hairstreak butterfly, Strymon melinus, on fava beans. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Seen any gray hairstreaks, lately? No, not on someone's head. This is the butterfly, Strymon melilnus, from the Lycaenidae family, known as the...

A gray hairstreak butterfly, Strymon melinus, on fava beans. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A gray hairstreak butterfly, Strymon melinus, on fava beans. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A gray hairstreak butterfly, Strymon melinus, on fava beans. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, April 9, 2021 at 6:32 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Health, Yard & Garden

Hello, Spring! Welcome, Western Tiger Swallowtail

A Western tiger swallowtail, missing part of its tails, nectars March 30 on a lilac bush at a Vacaville park. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Hello, spring! It's not "officially" spring until we see--and photograph--the spectacular Western tiger swallowtail, Papilio rutulus. One landed...

A Western tiger swallowtail, missing part of its tails, nectars March 30 on a lilac bush at a Vacaville park. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A Western tiger swallowtail, missing part of its tails, nectars March 30 on a lilac bush at a Vacaville park. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Western tiger swallowtail, missing part of its tails, nectars March 30 on a lilac bush at a Vacaville park. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The nectar met with this butterfly's approval. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The nectar met with this butterfly's approval. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The nectar met with this butterfly's approval. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Side view of the Western tiger swallowtail on the lilac bush. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Side view of the Western tiger swallowtail on the lilac bush. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Side view of the Western tiger swallowtail on the lilac bush. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ready to take flight, the Western tiger swallowtail sips a little more nectar from the lilac bush. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Ready to take flight, the Western tiger swallowtail sips a little more nectar from the lilac bush. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ready to take flight, the Western tiger swallowtail sips a little more nectar from the lilac bush. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, April 2, 2021 at 4:17 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Innovation, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

A Monarch Named Henry on 'Hello Yellow'

This is Henry as a winter monarch caterpillar found in the front yard of Karen Gideon, Greenbrae. It was feasting on  her milkweed, “Hello Yellow” Asclepias tuberosa, native to eastern and southwestern North America. (Photo by Karen Gideon)

Meet Henry, "an unexpected guest." Make that "an early, unexpected guest who was given a warm welcome and an even warmer send-off." Henry is a...

This is Henry as a winter monarch caterpillar found in the front yard of Karen Gideon, Greenbrae. It was feasting on  her milkweed, “Hello Yellow” Asclepias tuberosa, native to eastern and southwestern North America. (Photo by Karen Gideon)
This is Henry as a winter monarch caterpillar found in the front yard of Karen Gideon, Greenbrae. It was feasting on her milkweed, “Hello Yellow” Asclepias tuberosa, native to eastern and southwestern North America. (Photo by Karen Gideon)

This is Henry as a winter monarch caterpillar found in the front yard of Karen Gideon, Greenbrae. It was feasting on her milkweed, “Hello Yellow” Asclepias tuberosa, native to eastern and southwestern North America. (Photo by Karen Gideon)

Henry as a chrysalis attached to Alanna Brady's teak birdhouse. (Photo by Alanna Brady)
Henry as a chrysalis attached to Alanna Brady's teak birdhouse. (Photo by Alanna Brady)

Henry as a chrysalis attached to Alanna Brady's teak birdhouse. (Photo by Alanna Brady)

Henry as a newly eclosed monarch butterfly drying his wings. (Photo by Alanna Brady)
Henry as a newly eclosed monarch butterfly drying his wings. (Photo by Alanna Brady)

Henry as a newly eclosed monarch butterfly drying his wings. (Photo by Alanna Brady)

Henry spreads his wings. (Photo by Alanna Brady)
Henry spreads his wings. (Photo by Alanna Brady)

Henry spreads his wings. (Photo by Alanna Brady)

Posted on Thursday, March 11, 2021 at 2:46 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

'Climate Change' May Be a Key Factor in Declining Butterfly Populations

Edith’s checkerspot (Euphydryas editha) is one of the species declining in at least two datasets quoted in the Science publication. (Photo courtesy of Walter Siegmund, Wikipedia)

The public tends to blame habitat loss and pesticides for the declining butterfly populations in the Western United States. But climate change, aka...

Edith’s checkerspot (Euphydryas editha) is one of the species declining in at least two datasets quoted in the Science publication. (Photo courtesy of Walter Siegmund, Wikipedia)
Edith’s checkerspot (Euphydryas editha) is one of the species declining in at least two datasets quoted in the Science publication. (Photo courtesy of Walter Siegmund, Wikipedia)

Edith’s checkerspot (Euphydryas editha) is one of the species declining in at least two datasets quoted in the Science publication. (Photo courtesy of Walter Siegmund, Wikipedia)

UC Davis distinguished professor Art Shapiro monitoring butterfly populations along Gates Canyon Road, Vacaville. This image was taken Jan. 25, 2014. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
UC Davis distinguished professor Art Shapiro monitoring butterfly populations along Gates Canyon Road, Vacaville. This image was taken Jan. 25, 2014. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis distinguished professor Art Shapiro monitoring butterfly populations along Gates Canyon Road, Vacaville. This image was taken Jan. 25, 2014. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, March 5, 2021 at 1:45 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Health, Yard & Garden

Winter Monarchs: Thankfully, They're Out There

A monarch caterpillar and a honey bee sharing tropical milkweed, Asclepias curassavica, in the summer of 2020 in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Thankfully, they're out there. Butterfly guru Art Shapiro, UC Davis distinguished professor of evolution and ecology, spotted a female monarch...

A monarch caterpillar and a honey bee sharing tropical milkweed, Asclepias curassavica, in the summer of 2020 in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A monarch caterpillar and a honey bee sharing tropical milkweed, Asclepias curassavica, in the summer of 2020 in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A monarch caterpillar and a honey bee sharing tropical milkweed, Asclepias curassavica, in the summer of 2020 in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This is the graph that WSU entomologist David James posted on his Facebook research page, Monarchs Butterflies in the Pacific Northwest.
This is the graph that WSU entomologist David James posted on his Facebook research page, Monarchs Butterflies in the Pacific Northwest.

This is the graph that WSU entomologist David James posted on his Facebook research page, Monarchs Butterflies in the Pacific Northwest.

Posted on Tuesday, March 2, 2021 at 4:05 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

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