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Posts Tagged: Apis mellifera

Bee Inspired: It's World Bee Day!

A honey bee dusted with pollen from Gaillardia, also known as

Did you observe World Bee Day today? Every year on May 20, the United Nations asks us to think about this day, "to raise awareness of the...

A honey bee dusted with pollen from Gaillardia, also known as
A honey bee dusted with pollen from Gaillardia, also known as "the blanket flower." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee dusted with pollen from Gaillardia, also known as "the blanket flower." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Is that you in there? A honey bee looks up at the photographer as she forages on Gaillardia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Is that you in there? A honey bee looks up at the photographer as she forages on Gaillardia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Is that you in there? A honey bee looks up at the photographer as she forages on Gaillardia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, May 20, 2020 at 5:22 PM
Tags: apiculture (4), Apis mellifera (26), Gaillardia (18), honey bee (210), World Bee Day (2)
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Environment, Food, Innovation, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

David and Goliath? Underdog Vs. Bigger Opponent?

A honey bee comes faces to face with a Valley carpenter bee on a mustard blossom. The Valley carpenter bee is native to the United States, while the honey bee is native to Europe. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Remember the biblical story about David and Goliath? How young David, the underdog, defeats a Philistine giant? Sometimes you think the same kind of...

A honey bee comes faces to face with a Valley carpenter bee on a mustard blossom. The Valley carpenter bee is native to the United States, while the honey bee is native to Europe. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A honey bee comes faces to face with a Valley carpenter bee on a mustard blossom. The Valley carpenter bee is native to the United States, while the honey bee is native to Europe. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee comes faces to face with a Valley carpenter bee on a mustard blossom. The Valley carpenter bee is native to the United States, while the honey bee is native to Europe. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The Valley carpenter bee spreads her wings, claiming the entire flower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The Valley carpenter bee spreads her wings, claiming the entire flower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The Valley carpenter bee spreads her wings, claiming the entire flower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This is the male Valley carpenter bee, Xylocopa varipuncta, also known as
This is the male Valley carpenter bee, Xylocopa varipuncta, also known as "the teddy bear bee." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This is the male Valley carpenter bee, Xylocopa varipuncta, also known as "the teddy bear bee." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, April 8, 2020 at 5:27 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Economic Development, Environment, Innovation, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

All Hail the Honey Bee

A honey bee, her head and antenna covered with mustard pollen, heads for more pollen in a bed of mustard in Vacavilel, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

All hail the honey bee! It's an immigrant, like almost all of us, except for the Native Americans. European colonists brought the honey bee (Apis...

A honey bee, her head and antenna covered with mustard pollen, heads for more pollen in a bed of mustard in Vacavilel, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A honey bee, her head and antenna covered with mustard pollen, heads for more pollen in a bed of mustard in Vacavilel, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee, her head and antenna covered with mustard pollen, heads for more pollen in a bed of mustard in Vacavilel, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Like a race horse, this bee seems to be bolting toward the finish line, a mustard blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Like a race horse, this bee seems to be bolting toward the finish line, a mustard blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Like a race horse, this bee seems to be bolting toward the finish line, a mustard blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Thar's gold in them thar hills--and gold pollen on her head, antennae, and thorax, not to mention the balls of pollen. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Thar's gold in them thar hills--and gold pollen on her head, antennae, and thorax, not to mention the balls of pollen. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Thar's gold in them thar hills--and gold pollen on her head, antennae, and thorax, not to mention the balls of pollen. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, April 7, 2020 at 5:44 PM
Tags: Apis mellifera (26), honey bee (210), immigrant (1), mustard (15)
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Economic Development, Environment, Health, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

The Butterfly and the Bee

An alfalfa butterfly, Colias eurytheme, sips nectar from an African blue basil blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It's a strikingly beautiful insect. But in its larval stage, the alfalfa butterfly, Colias eurytheme--also known as the orange sulphur butterfly--is...

An alfalfa butterfly, Colias eurytheme, sips nectar from an African blue basil blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
An alfalfa butterfly, Colias eurytheme, sips nectar from an African blue basil blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

An alfalfa butterfly, Colias eurytheme, sips nectar from an African blue basil blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee shadows an alfalfa butterfly, Colias eurytheme, on African blue basil. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A honey bee shadows an alfalfa butterfly, Colias eurytheme, on African blue basil. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee shadows an alfalfa butterfly, Colias eurytheme, on African blue basil. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Two can get along: the alfalfa butterfly and the honey bee. In its larval stage, this butterfly is a pest. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Two can get along: the alfalfa butterfly and the honey bee. In its larval stage, this butterfly is a pest. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Two can get along: the alfalfa butterfly and the honey bee. In its larval stage, this butterfly is a pest. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, October 8, 2019 at 9:00 AM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Innovation, Pest Management, Yard & Garden

The Crab Spider and the Bee

A crab spider has just ambushed a honey bee on a bluebeard blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It was a good day for a crab spider. It was NOT a good day for a honey bee. It's early evening and here's this bee foraging on a bluebeard plant,...

A crab spider has just ambushed a honey bee on a bluebeard blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A crab spider has just ambushed a honey bee on a bluebeard blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A crab spider has just ambushed a honey bee on a bluebeard blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The crab spider can turn colors from white to yellow or yellow to white This one is yellow, awaiting prey on a blanketflower, Gallardia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The crab spider can turn colors from white to yellow or yellow to white This one is yellow, awaiting prey on a blanketflower, Gallardia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The crab spider can turn colors from white to yellow or yellow to white This one is yellow, awaiting prey on a blanketflower, Gallardia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, August 5, 2019 at 6:34 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

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