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Posts Tagged: Alfalfa

Kearney Alfalfa and Forage Virtual Field Day: September 23, 2020

SJV Mohawk PeteGoodell

SIGN UP TODAY! Date: September 23, 2020 Time: 8:30 AM - 12:00 PM Location: Zoom Meeting Registration: Click here to...

Posted on Tuesday, September 8, 2020 at 9:55 AM
Tags: AgRIC (12), Alfalfa (52), Field Day (6), Forage (8), Sorghum (12), Sugar beets (1)
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture

A Bug That's Not Wanted in the Vineyards

The three-cornered alfalfa leaf hopper, Spissistilus festinus, transmits the grapevine red blotch virus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Back in July of 2016, a team of researchers affiliated with the University of California, Davis, wrote in the journal Phytopathology that the...

The three-cornered alfalfa leaf hopper, Spissistilus festinus, transmits the grapevine red blotch virus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The three-cornered alfalfa leaf hopper, Spissistilus festinus, transmits the grapevine red blotch virus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The three-cornered alfalfa leaf hopper, Spissistilus festinus, transmits the grapevine red blotch virus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A three-cornered alfalfa leaf hopper, Spissistilus festinus, on a grape leaf. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A three-cornered alfalfa leaf hopper, Spissistilus festinus, on a grape leaf. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A three-cornered alfalfa leaf hopper, Spissistilus festinus, on a grape leaf. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The leaf on the right has grapevine red blotch virus. (Photo by Raul Girardelo, UC Davis)
The leaf on the right has grapevine red blotch virus. (Photo by Raul Girardelo, UC Davis)

The leaf on the right has grapevine red blotch virus. (Photo by Raul Girardelo, UC Davis)

Posted on Wednesday, December 11, 2019 at 4:35 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Economic Development, Environment, Innovation, Natural Resources, Pest Management

The Butterfly and the Bee

An alfalfa butterfly, Colias eurytheme, sips nectar from an African blue basil blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It's a strikingly beautiful insect. But in its larval stage, the alfalfa butterfly, Colias eurytheme--also known as the orange sulphur butterfly--is...

An alfalfa butterfly, Colias eurytheme, sips nectar from an African blue basil blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
An alfalfa butterfly, Colias eurytheme, sips nectar from an African blue basil blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

An alfalfa butterfly, Colias eurytheme, sips nectar from an African blue basil blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee shadows an alfalfa butterfly, Colias eurytheme, on African blue basil. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A honey bee shadows an alfalfa butterfly, Colias eurytheme, on African blue basil. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee shadows an alfalfa butterfly, Colias eurytheme, on African blue basil. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Two can get along: the alfalfa butterfly and the honey bee. In its larval stage, this butterfly is a pest. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Two can get along: the alfalfa butterfly and the honey bee. In its larval stage, this butterfly is a pest. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Two can get along: the alfalfa butterfly and the honey bee. In its larval stage, this butterfly is a pest. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, October 8, 2019 at 9:00 AM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Innovation, Pest Management, Yard & Garden

The leafcutter bee is an efficient alfalfa pollinator

The hard work put in every summer by leafcutter bees was spotlighted by KQED Science, which took a Deep Look at an introduced pollinator that makes bountiful alfalfa seed production possible in California.

For facts behind the 'gee whiz' video, KQED turned to Shannon Mueller, UC Cooperative Extension alfalfa advisor emeritus, who helped introduce leafcutter bees in the early 1990s.

What makes leafcutter bees special? It's their innate ability to 'trip' alfalfa flowers, which is beautifully explained and shown - in slow motion - in the Deep Look video.

Cutters were “game changers” in the alfalfa seed business because they're much better at pollinating alfalfa than honeybees, Mueller said. Cutters trip 80 percent of flowers they visit, compared to honeybees, which only trip about 10 percent.

Leafcutting bees pollinate alfalfa, allowing the plants to form seeds. The seeds will be grown to make nutritious hay for dairy cows, giving credit to leafcutter bees' for their labor on the first step to making ice cream.

Leafcutter bees fly to their hive. (Photo: Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Posted on Thursday, September 12, 2019 at 9:06 AM
Tags: alfalfa (52), Shannon Mueller (3)
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture

2019 Annual UC Alfalfa and Forage Field Day at Kearney Scheduled for September

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2019 Annual Alfalfa and Forage Field Day Thursday, September 19, 2019 UC Kearney Agricultural Research and Extension Center, Parlier 9240 S....

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Posted on Wednesday, June 12, 2019 at 9:54 AM
  • Author: Nicholas Clark
  • Author: Lynn Sosnoskie
  • Author: Joy Hollingsworth
Tags: Alfalfa (52), Field Day (6), Forage (8), IPM (38), Pest Management (8)
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Environment, Pest Management

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