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Posts Tagged: praying mantis

Passion Is Where You Find It

A female praying mantis, Mantis religiosa, crawls over a passionflower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Those passion flowers (Passiflora) are insect magnets. One minute you'll see a praying mantis on a blossom. The next minute, a Gulf Fritillary,...

A female praying mantis, Mantis religiosa, crawls over a passionflower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A female praying mantis, Mantis religiosa, crawls over a passionflower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A female praying mantis, Mantis religiosa, crawls over a passionflower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Gulf Fritillary, Agraulis vanillae, lands on a passionflower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A Gulf Fritillary, Agraulis vanillae, lands on a passionflower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Gulf Fritillary, Agraulis vanillae, lands on a passionflower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Notice the spider's thread across the blossom of this passionflower vine? The spider knows where the prey is. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Notice the spider's thread across the blossom of this passionflower vine? The spider knows where the prey is. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Notice the spider's thread across the blossom of this passionflower vine? The spider knows where the prey is. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, October 21, 2020 at 3:00 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

Will a Praying Mantis Eat a Caterpillar?

Gulf Fritillaries flutter over a praying mantis, Mantis religiosa, in a passionflower patch in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Will a praying mantis eat a caterpillar? Short answer: Yes. For several days, we've been watching a resident praying mantis, a female Mantis...

Gulf Fritillaries flutter over a praying mantis, Mantis religiosa, in a passionflower patch in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Gulf Fritillaries flutter over a praying mantis, Mantis religiosa, in a passionflower patch in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Gulf Fritillaries flutter over a praying mantis, Mantis religiosa, in a passionflower patch in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ahh! The praying mantis finds a non-fluttering target, a Gulf Fritillary munching on the leaves of a passionflower vine. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Ahh! The praying mantis finds a non-fluttering target, a Gulf Fritillary munching on the leaves of a passionflower vine. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ahh! The praying mantis finds a non-fluttering target, a Gulf Fritillary munching on the leaves of a passionflower vine. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Gotcha! The praying mantis stretches her spiked forelegs to reach the caterpillar. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Gotcha! The praying mantis stretches her spiked forelegs to reach the caterpillar. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Gotcha! The praying mantis stretches her spiked forelegs to reach the caterpillar. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Will a praying mantis eat a caterpillar? Yes. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Will a praying mantis eat a caterpillar? Yes. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Will a praying mantis eat a caterpillar? Yes. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Praying mantis rapidly finishing her dinner. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Praying mantis rapidly finishing her dinner. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Praying mantis rapidly finishing her dinner. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, October 12, 2020 at 4:14 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

Not a Good Day for a Bee

A gravid Stagmomantis limbata eyes a honey bee nectaring on African blue basil. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A gravid praying mantis, Stagmomantis limbata, crawls out of a patch of African blue basil, and begins checking out the honey...

A gravid Stagmomantis limbata eyes a honey bee nectaring on African blue basil. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A gravid Stagmomantis limbata eyes a honey bee nectaring on African blue basil. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A gravid Stagmomantis limbata eyes a honey bee nectaring on African blue basil. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The praying mantis grips the honey bee with her spiked forelegs. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The praying mantis grips the honey bee with her spiked forelegs. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The praying mantis grips the honey bee with her spiked forelegs. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

As the praying mantis eats the honey bee, another honey bee comes over to investigate. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
As the praying mantis eats the honey bee, another honey bee comes over to investigate. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

As the praying mantis eats the honey bee, another honey bee comes over to investigate. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Soon another honey bee appears on the scene. The two bees quickly left. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Soon another honey bee appears on the scene. The two bees quickly left. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Soon another honey bee appears on the scene. The two bees quickly left. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, October 2, 2020 at 1:35 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Environment, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

The Honey Bee and the Praying Mantis

A honey bee nectaring on African blue basil blossoms is unaware that on the other side, camouflaged and hidden in the shadows, is a praying mantis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

So I'm a praying mantis and being a top-notch real estate developer, I've located the best place in the pollinator garden. I have acquired the proper...

A honey bee nectaring on African blue basil blossoms is unaware that on the other side, camouflaged and hidden in the shadows, is a praying mantis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A honey bee nectaring on African blue basil blossoms is unaware that on the other side, camouflaged and hidden in the shadows, is a praying mantis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee nectaring on African blue basil blossoms is unaware that on the other side, camouflaged and hidden in the shadows, is a praying mantis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The honey bee, intent on gathering nectar, doesn't notice a praying mantis in her flight zone. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The honey bee, intent on gathering nectar, doesn't notice a praying mantis in her flight zone. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The honey bee, intent on gathering nectar, doesn't notice a praying mantis in her flight zone. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)


"Oops, what's that blocking my path?" the bee says. "Look at those spiked forelegs. This might not end well." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

"Oops, what's that blocking my path?" the bee says. "Look at those spiked forelegs. This might not end well." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This honey bee survives to visit the African blue basil patch another day. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
This honey bee survives to visit the African blue basil patch another day. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This honey bee survives to visit the African blue basil patch another day. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)


"Oh, well, I forgot to pray before breakfast." The praying mantis assumes its position. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

"Oh, well, I forgot to pray before breakfast." The praying mantis assumes its position. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, September 18, 2020 at 5:29 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Food, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

How a Praying Mantis Seizes the Day

A female Stagmomantis limbata nymph starts the day by hanging upside down: keeps the blood flowing and the heart pumping. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

If you're a praying mantis, it's important to start the day out right by meditating, praying,  and  exercising.  Close your eyes and...

A female Stagmomantis limbata nymph starts the day by hanging upside down: keeps the blood flowing and the heart pumping. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A female Stagmomantis limbata nymph starts the day by hanging upside down: keeps the blood flowing and the heart pumping. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A female Stagmomantis limbata nymph starts the day by hanging upside down: keeps the blood flowing and the heart pumping. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Balance training? Turn parallel as if you're on the parallel bars. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Balance training? Turn parallel as if you're on the parallel bars. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Balance training? Turn parallel as if you're on the parallel bars. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Stretching is a great way to kick-start your day. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Stretching is a great way to kick-start your day. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Stretching is a great way to kick-start your day. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Lunges are good to make sure your coxa, trochanter, femur, tibia and tarsa are flexible. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Lunges are good to make sure your coxa, trochanter, femur, tibia and tarsa are flexible. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Lunges are good to make sure your coxa, trochanter, femur, tibia and tarsa are flexible. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Daily morning exercise completed. Now turn upright and you may see a bee coming your way. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Daily morning exercise completed. Now turn upright and you may see a bee coming your way. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Daily morning exercise completed. Now turn upright and you may see a bee coming your way. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, August 14, 2020 at 3:25 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Food, Innovation, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

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