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Water measurement and reporting course offered by UCCE Nov. 18

California water-rights holders can get certified to take the required water measurements themselves.

California water-rights holders are required by state law to measure and report the water they divert from surface streams. For people who wish to take the water measurements themselves, the University of California Cooperative Extension is offering a virtual training to receive certification Nov. 18. 

At the workshop, participants can expect to:

  • clarify reporting requirements for ranches.
  • understand what meters are appropriate for different situations.
  • learn how to determine measurement equipment accuracy.
  • develop an understanding of measurement weirs.
  • learn how to calculate and report volume from flow data.

Registration is $25 per participant. If you would like a binder of materials mailed to you, there is an additional $15 fee. A Zoom link will be sent to participants after registration. To register, visit http://ucanr.edu/survey/survey.cfm?surveynumber=32393.

“We are limiting the number participants for thewater measurement training to 30 people,” said Larry Forero, UC Cooperative Extension livestock and natural resources advisor. “If you need this training, register soon.”  

For more information, contact Forero at lcforero@ucanr.edu or Sara Jaimes at sbjaimes@ucanr.edu or call the UCCE office in Shasta County at (530) 224-4900.

Background:

Senate Bill 88 requires that all water right holders who have previously diverted or intend to divert more than 10 acre-feet per year (riparian and pre-1914 claims), or who are authorized to divert more than 10 acre-feet per year under a permit, license, or registration, to measure and report the water they divert. 

Detailed information on the regulatory requirements for measurement and reporting is available on the State Water Resources Control Board Reporting and Measurement Regulation webpage. The legislation as written requires for diversion (or storage) greater than or equal to 100-acre feet annually that installation and certification of measurement methods be approved by an engineer/contractor/professional. 

The California Cattlemen's Association worked with Assemblyman Bigelow to introduce a bill that would allow a self-certification option. Assembly Bill 589 became law on Jan. 1, 2018. This bill, until Jan. 1, 2023, allows any diverter, as defined, “who has completed this instructional course on measurement devices and methods administered by the University of California Cooperative Extension,” including passage of a proficiency test, to be considered a qualified individual when installing and maintaining devices or implementing methods of measurement. The bill required UC Cooperative Extension and the board to jointly develop the curriculum for the course and the proficiency test.

Posted on Friday, October 30, 2020 at 5:58 PM
Tags: Khaled Bali (12), Larry Forero (6), Water (75)
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture

Emily Bick: Salinity, the Water Hyacinth and a Weevil

This is the giant water bath created from a leftover evaporative cooler from the Michael Parrella lab.

If that heavy growth of water hyacinth in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta in central California alarms you, then you'll want to read a newly...

This is the giant water bath created from a leftover evaporative cooler from the Michael Parrella lab.
This is the giant water bath created from a leftover evaporative cooler from the Michael Parrella lab.

This is the giant water bath created from a leftover evaporative cooler from the Michael Parrella lab.

The water hyacinth, Eichhornia crassipes, is an invasive weed but has an attractive flower. (Photo by Wouter Hagens, Wikipedia)
The water hyacinth, Eichhornia crassipes, is an invasive weed but has an attractive flower. (Photo by Wouter Hagens, Wikipedia)

The water hyacinth, Eichhornia crassipes, is an invasive weed but has an attractive flower. (Photo by Wouter Hagens, Wikipedia)

Posted on Wednesday, August 12, 2020 at 5:54 PM
Focus Area Tags: Economic Development, Environment, Innovation, Natural Resources, Pest Management

Why More Water Bears Are Heading for the Bohart Museum of Entomology

Lynn Kimsey, director of the Bohart Museum of Entomology, with part of the museum's tardigrade collection. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The Bohart Museum of Entomology at UC Davis, which houses one of the largest collections of water bears or tardigrades in the world, stands to get...

Lynn Kimsey, director of the Bohart Museum of Entomology, with part of the museum's tardigrade collection. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Lynn Kimsey, director of the Bohart Museum of Entomology, with part of the museum's tardigrade collection. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Lynn Kimsey, director of the Bohart Museum of Entomology, with part of the museum's tardigrade collection. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The proposed water bear sculpture at Bohart Museum of Entomology. The Bohart Museum Society has set up a go-fund-me account.
The proposed water bear sculpture at Bohart Museum of Entomology. The Bohart Museum Society has set up a go-fund-me account.

The proposed water bear sculpture at Bohart Museum of Entomology. The Bohart Museum Society has set up a go-fund-me account.

Posted on Thursday, July 9, 2020 at 5:27 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Innovation

One-fifth of valley farmland to go fallow when groundwater rules go into effect

UC Cooperative Extension specialist David Sunding and UC Berkeley professor David Roland-Holst estimate that one-fifth of cultivated farmland in the San Joaquin Valley will be permanently lost as groundwater plans take hold and water supplies are severely restricted, reported Todd Fitchette in Western Farm Press.

The report, Blueprint Economic Impact Analysis: Phase One Results, says statewide the losses could total about 992,000 acres of farmland, losses of over $7 billion from crop revenue and a loss in farm operating income of nearly $2 billion.

The Sustainable Groundwater Management Act (SGMA) was passed during the 2011-2016 drought to return California aquifers to sustainable levels after decades of over drafting. Local agencies will ensure that groundwater extraction matches groundwater replenishment by 2040.

The report says the rise in almond acreage across the state will soon need to end as farmers in the San Joaquin Valley fallow more than 325,000 acres of tree nuts. Two-thirds of that acreage will be pulled from Fresno and Kern counties.

The labor market will also take a hit.

"We calculate that the direct employment losses from SGMA plus anticipated surface water reductions will total 42,000 jobs on average," Sunding and Roland-Holst wrote. These employment losses ... total $1.1 billion annually in the San Joaquin Valley."

Groundwater is drawn by a pump to irrigate almonds in Fresno County.
Posted on Wednesday, March 25, 2020 at 8:56 AM
Tags: David Roland-Holst (1), David Sunding (2), SGMA (1), water (75)
Focus Area Tags: Environment

Water measurement and reporting courses offered by UCCE April 14

At the training, participants learn accuracy tips such as making sure the measurement location is level with weir crest. Photo by Larry Forero

These workshops have been postponed due to the coronavirus pandemic.

California water-rights holders are required by state law to measure and report the water they divert from surface streams. For people who wish to take the water measurements themselves, the University of California Cooperative Extension is offering training to receive certification in Redding and Woodland.

At the workshop, participants can expect to:

  • clarify reporting requirements for ranches.
  • understand what meters are appropriate for different situations.
  • learn how to determine measurement equipment accuracy.
  • develop an understanding of measurement weirs.
  • learn how to calculate and report volume from flow data.

Trainings are scheduled for April 14, 2020:

8 a.m. - 11:30 a.m. at Shasta College Farm in Redding. A registration form can be downloaded at  http://ceshasta.ucanr.edu/files/280448.pdf. For more information, contact Larry Forero (lcforero@ucanr.edu) or Sara Jaimes (sbjaimes@ucanr.edu) at the UCCE office in Shasta County at (530) 224-4900.

2:30 p.m. - 5:30 p.m. at UC Cooperative Extension in Woodland. Register at http://cecapitolcorridor.ucanr.edu. For more information, contact Morgan Doran at mpdoran@ucanr.edu) or (530) 666-8143.

“There will be a limited number of water measurement trainings offered in 2020,” said Larry Forero, UC Cooperative Extension livestock and natural resources advisor. “If you need this training, register soon.” 

Background:

Senate Bill 88 requires that all water right holders who have previously diverted or intend to divert more than 10 acre-feet per year (riparian and pre-1914 claims), or who are authorized to divert more than 10 acre-feet per year under a permit, license, or registration, to measure and report the water they divert. 

Detailed information on the regulatory requirements for measurement and reporting is available on the State Water Resources Control Board Reporting and Measurement Regulation webpage. The legislation as written requires for diversion (or storage) greater than or equal to 100-acre feet annually that installation and certification of measurement methods be approved by an engineer/contractor/professional. 

The California Cattlemen's Association worked with Assemblyman Frank Bigelow to introduce a bill that would allow a self-certification option. Assembly Bill 589 became law on Jan. 1, 2018. This bill, until Jan. 1, 2023, allows any diverter, as defined, “who has completed this instructional course on measurement devices and methods administered by the University of California Cooperative Extension,” including passage of a proficiency test, to be considered a qualified individual when installing and maintaining devices or implementing methods of measurement. The bill required UC Cooperative Extension and the board to jointly develop the curriculum for the course and the proficiency test.

Posted on Wednesday, March 4, 2020 at 3:30 PM
Tags: Larry Forero (6), Water (75)
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture

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