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Posts Tagged: garden

The Secrets of Sea Squill

Sea squill (Drimia maritima or Urginea maritima) thrives in the Carolee Shields White Flower Garden and Gazebo, UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Honey bees are the first thing you notice about the sea squill (Drimiamaritima or Urginea maritima) in the 100-acre UC Davis Arboretum...

Sea squill (Drimia maritima or Urginea maritima) thrives in the Carolee Shields White Flower Garden and Gazebo, UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Sea squill (Drimia maritima or Urginea maritima) thrives in the Carolee Shields White Flower Garden and Gazebo, UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Sea squill (Drimia maritima or Urginea maritima) thrives in the Carolee Shields White Flower Garden and Gazebo, UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, September 9, 2020 at 4:32 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

A Monarch Paradise in July

A monarch caterpillar molting. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Monarchs, bless their little hearts, souls and wings, deposited 16 eggs on our milkweed plants in July.  Being quite obliging and considerate,...

A monarch caterpillar molting. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A monarch caterpillar molting. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A monarch caterpillar molting. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A monarch caterpillar j'ing; soon it will be a chrysalis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A monarch caterpillar j'ing; soon it will be a chrysalis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A monarch caterpillar j'ing; soon it will be a chrysalis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

From left, a chrysalis about to release a monarch; an empty chrysalis or empty pupal exoskeleton, exuvia; a chrysalis; and an newly eclosed adult monarch. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
From left, a chrysalis about to release a monarch; an empty chrysalis or empty pupal exoskeleton, exuvia; a chrysalis; and an newly eclosed adult monarch. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

From left, a chrysalis about to release a monarch; an empty chrysalis or empty pupal exoskeleton, exuvia; a chrysalis; and an newly eclosed adult monarch. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A newly eclosed female monarch on a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A newly eclosed female monarch on a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A newly eclosed female monarch on a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A female monarch nectaring on a tropical milkweed. This milkweed yielded five caterpillars. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A female monarch nectaring on a tropical milkweed. This milkweed yielded five caterpillars. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A female monarch nectaring on a tropical milkweed. This milkweed yielded five caterpillars. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, August 5, 2020 at 3:04 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Food, Natural Resources, Pest Management, Yard & Garden

Pollinia: Like Having Gum on Your Shoes

This wasp, a species of Podalonia, flies off a tropical milkweed at the UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden with a load of pollinia, a packet of sticky golden pollen grains. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

If you've ever stepped in sticky gum, it's similar to what happens when an insect steps into milkweed pollinia.  Take the wasps visiting the...

This wasp, a species of Podalonia, flies off a tropical milkweed at the UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden with a load of pollinia, a packet of sticky golden pollen grains. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
This wasp, a species of Podalonia, flies off a tropical milkweed at the UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden with a load of pollinia, a packet of sticky golden pollen grains. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This wasp, a species of Podalonia, flies off a tropical milkweed at the UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden with a load of pollinia, a packet of sticky golden pollen grains. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Podalonia wasp nectars on tropical milkweed at the UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A Podalonia wasp nectars on tropical milkweed at the UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Podalonia wasp nectars on tropical milkweed at the UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A wasp foraging upside down on tropical milkweed at the UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A wasp foraging upside down on tropical milkweed at the UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A wasp foraging upside down on tropical milkweed at the UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Off to another tropical milkweed--and off packing pollinia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Off to another tropical milkweed--and off packing pollinia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Off to another tropical milkweed--and off packing pollinia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Note the gold, wishboned-shaped  pollinia on the honey bee's feet as she heads for more showy milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Note the gold, wishboned-shaped pollinia on the honey bee's feet as she heads for more showy milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Note the gold, wishboned-shaped pollinia on the honey bee's feet as she heads for more showy milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, July 17, 2020 at 3:57 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

Widow Skimmer Dragonfly: What a Treat to See

A female widow skimmer dragonfly (Libellula luctuosa) rests in the Ruth Risdon Storer Garden, UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

She probably eats a lot of mosquitoes. After all, we just observed National Mosquito Control Awareness Week, June 21-27, didn't we? We spotted this...

A female widow skimmer dragonfly (Libellula luctuosa) rests in the Ruth Risdon Storer Garden, UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A female widow skimmer dragonfly (Libellula luctuosa) rests in the Ruth Risdon Storer Garden, UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A female widow skimmer dragonfly (Libellula luctuosa) rests in the Ruth Risdon Storer Garden, UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Side view of a female widow skimmer dragonfly (Libellula luctuosa) in the Ruth Risdon Storer Garden, UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Side view of a female widow skimmer dragonfly (Libellula luctuosa) in the Ruth Risdon Storer Garden, UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Side view of a female widow skimmer dragonfly (Libellula luctuosa) in the Ruth Risdon Storer Garden, UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, June 29, 2020 at 4:16 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

Portraits of a Monarch Just Stopping By

A male monarch, Danaus plexippus, spreads its wings on a tower of jewels (Echium wildpretii) in Vacaville, Calif. on Sunday, May 23. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Welcome, Danaus plexippus!  A monarch butterfly, the first of the year, fluttered through our family pollinator garden in Vacaville,...

A male monarch, Danaus plexippus, spreads its wings on a tower of jewels (Echium wildpretii) in Vacaville, Calif. on Sunday, May 23. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A male monarch, Danaus plexippus, spreads its wings on a tower of jewels (Echium wildpretii) in Vacaville, Calif. on Sunday, May 23. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A male monarch, Danaus plexippus, spreads its wings on a tower of jewels (Echium wildpretii) in Vacaville, Calif. on Sunday, May 23. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The monarch lands on a mallow, Althaea officinalis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The monarch lands on a mallow, Althaea officinalis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The monarch lands on a mallow, Althaea officinalis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The monarch took a liking to a yellow rose,
The monarch took a liking to a yellow rose, "Sparkle and Shine," related to the Julia Child rose. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The monarch took a liking to a yellow rose, "Sparkle and Shine," related to the Julia Child rose. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The monarch touched down on a succulent, hens-and-chicks (when it blooms, it's known as a
The monarch touched down on a succulent, hens-and-chicks (when it blooms, it's known as a "rooster." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The monarch touched down on a succulent, hens-and-chicks (when it blooms, it's known as a "rooster." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The monarch stayed on the ear of a cat (garden sculpture)  for about five minutes. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The monarch stayed on the ear of a cat (garden sculpture) for about five minutes. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The monarch stayed on the ear of a cat (garden sculpture) for about five minutes. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, May 25, 2020 at 3:03 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment

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