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Posts Tagged: almonds

Almond and Walnut Pest Management Guidelines revised just in time for the holidays

‘Tis the season for baking lots of tasty treats. Breads, cookies, cakes, and candy are just a few that come to mind. What makes many of these treats so tasty is the addition of almonds or walnuts to the list of ingredients.

In California, we are lucky to be at the center of almond and walnut production. According to the California Department of Food and Agriculture's (CDFA's) latest Agricultural Statistics Review, more than 99 percent of the almonds and walnuts produced in the United States are grown in California.

Almond and walnut growers work tirelessly to supply enough nuts to not only satisfy domestic demand, but also for export. Worldwide, almonds rank as the largest specialty crop export. California is the top almond producer in the world, accounting for about 80 percent of all almonds grown. For walnuts, California ranks as the second largest producer in the world. To keep up with this demand, almond and walnut growers must be constantly aware of pests, diseases, and abiotic problems that can affect the tree and growing nuts.

California is the top almond producer in the world, accounting for about 80% of all almonds grown. (Photo: Jack Kelly Clark)

The University of California Statewide Integrated Pest Management Program (UC IPM) has recently published revised Pest Management Guidelines for almonds and walnuts, helping growers prevent and manage pest problems with the most up-to-date information.

Revisions in the Almond Pest Management Guidelines include:

  • A new section on bacterial spot, a new disease of almond in California found in the Sacramento and northern San Joaquin valleys
  • A renamed section on fruit russeting, revised from the old powdery mildew section
  • Significant revisions made to the management section of navel orangeworm, one of the major pests attacking California almonds
  • Improvements on how to do dormant spur sampling section with easier-to-understand information on monitoring and thresholds
Bacterial spot on almond, a new disease of almond in California. (Photo: Brent A. Holtz)

Revisions in the Walnut Pest Management Guidelines include:

  • Updated information on the association between walnut twig beetle and thousand cankers disease
  • New sections for Botryosphaeria and Phomopsis cankers, branch wilt, and paradox canker
  • Significant changes to the walnut husk fly management section
Male (left) and female walnut twig beetles. (Photo: Larry L. Strand)

Both the almond and walnut revised Pest Management Guidelines also include updated information on fungicide efficacy, weed management, and vertebrate management.

Authored by University of California specialists and advisors, the Pest Management Guidelines are UC's official guidelines for monitoring and managing pests in California crops. For more information on pest management in these or other crops, visit the UC IPM website.

Posted on Tuesday, December 19, 2017 at 11:03 AM
Tags: almonds (60), pests (7), walnuts (11)

Interview With Tree Breeder Tom Gradziel

Tom Gradziel Breeding trees takes a long time, says Tom  Gradziel, a geneticist at the University of California, Davis. He knows this...

Posted on Monday, June 5, 2017 at 9:56 AM
  • Author: Rika Fields
  • Editor: David Alexander Foster
Tags: almonds (60), breeding (2), fnric (1), fruits and nuts (1), peaches (17)

Internet start-up gleans trust from association with UCCE

Ceres Imaging, an Oakland-based start-up, is working closely with UC Cooperative Extension on its aerial imaging of farm fields, a fact that is helping the company gain trust by association, reported Emma Foehringer Merchant on Grist.org.

Ceres puts equipment on low-flying airplanes to take pictures that will help farmers optimize water and fertilizer application. According to field tests, the imagery works. Since 2014, Ceres has teamed up with UC Cooperative Extension to conduct field trials, including one for the Almond Board that measured the response of nuts to different rates of watering. 

UCCE advisor Blake Sanden conducted trials in an almond orchard like this one to confirm data produced by Ceres Imaging.

In that study, data from Ceres' imaging matched well with the UCCE ground "truthing," said Blake Sanden, UC Cooperative Extension water and soils farm advisor. 

According to the article, "Ceres' relationship with the extension program has helped the company gain trust with sometimes-skeptical farmers." Sanden called UCCE trials the "gold standard of efficacy" for new products in the ag market. 

There is also increased interest in precise water management after years of drought and cutbacks on federal water allocation.

"The attitude (among farmers) used to be, 'I can find water,'" Sanden said. "I would say that 30, 40 years ago, there was an attitude of hope ... that some of the restrictions on pumping water (would) go away." He said growers expected decision-makers "to come back to reality and understand that we've got to make money in California and grow food."

But the restrictions didn't go away. Instead, they became stricter. The uncertainty about water deliveries has made farmers friendlier to new technologies, like the one offered by Ceres.

UCCE advisor Blake Sanden, shown here making a presentation, says UCCE confirmation is "the gold standard of efficacy" for new products in the ag market.
Posted on Thursday, May 4, 2017 at 3:12 PM
Tags: almonds (60), Blake Sanden (4), Ceres Imaging (1)

The 2017 tree nut and fruit season begins with a mixed bag

Wet and wacky winter weather may wreak havoc on the almond crop, but UC Cooperative Extension advisor Franz Niederholzer has promising words for farmers concerned about adequate pollination, reported Heather Hacking in the Chico Enterprise-Record.

“You don't need them to all be pollinated,” he said. A pollination rate of 40 percent would make a great year. Twenty five percent will still produce a decent crop.

The heavy rain, wind and cold temperatures that have characterized January and February 2017 could be overcome with just a bit of warm, sunny weather. In Chico, the weekend of Feb. 11-12 were sunny, as was Saturday the 18th. Those were good days for bees to fly.

Fungus is also a concern, said Danielle Lightle, UCCE advisor in Glenn County. Typically farmers watch the weather and spray fungicides before it rains. However, the persistent rain made orchard floors muddy, unfavorable conditions for moving heavy spray rigs.

Farmers who have been in the business for a while know that the golden rule is to “control what you can and let go of what you can't,” Lightle said.

A bee pollinates an almond blossom under sunny skies.
Posted on Monday, February 27, 2017 at 10:52 AM

Bees Are Back Pollinating the Almonds

A honey bee foraging on a feral almond tree today (Feb. 10) in Pleasants Valley, Vacaville.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It's almond pollination season in California but the weather refuses to cooperate. Heavy rains, high winds, intense flooding. What are the bees to...

A honey bee foraging on a feral almond tree today (Feb. 10) in Pleasants Valley, Vacaville.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A honey bee foraging on a feral almond tree today (Feb. 10) in Pleasants Valley, Vacaville.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee foraging on a feral almond tree today (Feb. 10) in Pleasants Valley, Vacaville.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A pollen-packing honey bee heads for another almond blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A pollen-packing honey bee heads for another almond blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A pollen-packing honey bee heads for another almond blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Blue skies, almonds blooming, bees buzzing--and all's right with the world. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Blue skies, almonds blooming, bees buzzing--and all's right with the world. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Blue skies, almonds blooming, bees buzzing--and all's right with the world. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, February 10, 2017 at 5:15 PM

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