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Posts Tagged: Neal Williams

What Native California Plants Are Best for Attracting Pollinators?

Phacelia campanularia was one of the 43 plants tested in the UC Davis research garden. Here a honey bee sips nectar from a blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

What native California plants are best for attracting pollinators? That's a question often asked. Now for answers. Three pollination ecologists...

Phacelia campanularia was one of the 43 plants tested in the UC Davis research garden. Here a honey bee sips nectar from a blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Phacelia campanularia was one of the 43 plants tested in the UC Davis research garden. Here a honey bee sips nectar from a blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Phacelia campanularia was one of the 43 plants tested in the UC Davis research garden. Here a honey bee sips nectar from a blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

These are some of the 43 plants tested in the UC Davis research garden. This is an illustration from the research paper. (Photos by Ola Lundin)
These are some of the 43 plants tested in the UC Davis research garden. This is an illustration from the research paper. (Photos by Ola Lundin)

These are some of the 43 plants tested in the UC Davis research garden. This is an illustration from the research paper. (Photos by Ola Lundin)

A Timely Topic and None Too Soon: The Troubling State of Pollinators

A yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus  Bombus vosnesenskii, foraging on a tower of jewels (Echium wildpretii) in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

What a timely topic--and none too soon! And the University of California, Davis, is a major part of it. Next July: a major occurrence in the world...

A yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus  Bombus vosnesenskii, foraging on a tower of jewels (Echium wildpretii) in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus Bombus vosnesenskii, foraging on a tower of jewels (Echium wildpretii) in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus Bombus vosnesenskii, foraging on a tower of jewels (Echium wildpretii) in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee heading toward a tower of jewels (Echium wildpretii) in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A honey bee heading toward a tower of jewels (Echium wildpretii) in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee heading toward a tower of jewels (Echium wildpretii) in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Congratulations to UC Davis Pollinator Ecologist Neal Williams

A yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenkii, heading toward a California golden poppy. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

With all the increasing--and alarming--global concern about declining pollinators, it's great to see some good news: pollination ecologist Neal...

A yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenkii, heading toward a California golden poppy. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenkii, heading toward a California golden poppy. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenkii, heading toward a California golden poppy. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Neal Williams working on his native bee research at the Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Facility. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Neal Williams working on his native bee research at the Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Facility. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Neal Williams working on his native bee research at the Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Facility. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Why Timing Is Everything in Bumble Bee Colonies

A yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenkii, nectaring on Anchusa azurea, of the borage family. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Timing is everything. Especially when it comes to bumble bee colonies. Postdoctoral scholar Rosemary Malfi of the Neal Williams lab, University of...

A yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenkii, nectaring on Anchusa azurea, of the borage family. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenkii, nectaring on Anchusa azurea, of the borage family. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenkii, nectaring on Anchusa azurea, of the borage family. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

One of Rosemary Malfi's bumble bee colonies. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
One of Rosemary Malfi's bumble bee colonies. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

One of Rosemary Malfi's bumble bee colonies. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, May 28, 2018 at 8:00 AM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture Natural Resources

How Many Wild Bee Species Do We Need to Pollinate Our Crops?

A bumble bee pollinating blueberries. (Photo courtesy of Rachael Winfree, Rutgers University)

They set out to answer the question: "How many wild bee species do we need to pollinate our crops?" The answer: "Not nearly enough bees are...

A bumble bee pollinating blueberries. (Photo courtesy of Rachael Winfree, Rutgers University)
A bumble bee pollinating blueberries. (Photo courtesy of Rachael Winfree, Rutgers University)

A bumble bee pollinating blueberries. (Photo courtesy of Rachael Winfree, Rutgers University)

Posted on Thursday, February 15, 2018 at 3:59 PM

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