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Posts Tagged: Jason Bond

Gotta Love Those Crab Spiders!

A crab spider nails a lygus bug, a pest. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Gotta love those crab spiders! We've seen them ambushing prey, eating prey and looking for more prey. They're members of...

A crab spider nails a lygus bug, a pest. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A crab spider nails a lygus bug, a pest. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A crab spider nails a lygus bug, a pest. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This green bottle fly met its fate, compliments of a crab spider. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
This green bottle fly met its fate, compliments of a crab spider. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This green bottly fly met its fate, compliments of a crab spider. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A crab spider tucked inside a zinnia blossom awaits prey. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A crab spider tucked inside a zinnia blossom awaits prey. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A crab spider tucked inside a zinnia blossom awaits prey. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, September 15, 2020 at 5:20 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

Spider Alert! Meet a Little Charmer

Spider alert! Spider alert! Some folks request a "spider alert" because they cringe in horror when they see an image of the eight-legged...


"Well, hello there!" A mature male crab spider, likely a Missumessus species (Thomisidae, crab spider) as identified by UC Davis Professor Jason Bond, peers at the camera from his Tithonia post. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

"Well, hello there!" A mature male crab spider, likely a Missumessus species (Thomisidae, crab spider) as identified by UC Davis Professor Jason Bond, peers at the camera from his Tithonia post. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)


"Hey, I'll pose for a side view." A male crab spider scuttles around on a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia rotundifolia). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

"Hey, I'll pose for a side view." A male crab spider scuttles around on a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia rotundifolia). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)


"Is this my best side?" The male crab spider strikes a "pose" for the camera. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

"Is this my best side?" The male crab spider strikes a "pose" for the camera. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)


"Watch me, I shall do my vanishing act!" The crab spider moves out of the photographer's view. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

"Watch me, I shall do my vanishing act!" The crab spider moves out of the photographer's view. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, July 16, 2020 at 2:17 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Yard & Garden

Name That Spider--And Did They Ever!

This is male of the species of a new genus of trapdoor spiders that UC Davis professor Jason Bond discovered in Monterey County. Bond proposes to name the genus, Cryptocteniza, part of which means “hidden or secret.” (Image by Jason Bond)

When UC Davis Professor Jason Bond  discovered a new genus of trapdoor spiders in Monterey County and issued a call for folks to name...

This is male of the species of a new genus of trapdoor spiders that UC Davis professor Jason Bond discovered in Monterey County. Bond proposes to name the genus, Cryptocteniza, part of which means “hidden or secret.” (Image by Jason Bond)
This is male of the species of a new genus of trapdoor spiders that UC Davis professor Jason Bond discovered in Monterey County. Bond proposes to name the genus, Cryptocteniza, part of which means “hidden or secret.” (Image by Jason Bond)

This is male of the species of a new genus of trapdoor spiders that UC Davis professor Jason Bond discovered in Monterey County. Bond proposes to name the genus, Cryptocteniza, part of which means “hidden or secret.” (Image by Jason Bond)

This is where UC Davis professor Jason Bond discovered a new genus of trapdoor spiders. (Illustrations by Jason Bond)
This is where UC Davis professor Jason Bond discovered a new genus of trapdoor spiders. (Illustrations by Jason Bond)

This is where UC Davis professor Jason Bond discovered a new genus of trapdoor spiders. (Illustrations by Jason Bond)

Posted on Friday, June 5, 2020 at 4:25 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Natural Resources

Name That Spider!

This is the female of the new genus, Cryptocteniza. (Image by Jason Bond)

Name that spider!  UC Davis professor Jason Bond is seeking a species name for a new genus of trapdoor spiders he discovered on a sandy beach...

This is the female of the new genus, Cryptocteniza. (Image by Jason Bond)
This is the female of the new genus, Cryptocteniza. (Image by Jason Bond)

This is the female of the new genus, Cryptocteniza. (Image by Jason Bond)

This is the male of the new genus, Cryptocteniza.  (Image by Jason Bond)
This is the male of the new genus, Cryptocteniza. (Image by Jason Bond)

This is the male of the new genus, Cryptocteniza. (Image by Jason Bond)

UC Davis professor Jason Bond found the genus on a sandy beach at Moss Landing State Park, Monterey County. (Illustration provided by Jason Bond)
UC Davis professor Jason Bond found the genus on a sandy beach at Moss Landing State Park, Monterey County. (Illustration provided by Jason Bond)

UC Davis professor Jason Bond found the genus on a sandy beach at Moss Landing State Park, Monterey County. (Illustration provided by Jason Bond)

Posted on Tuesday, May 19, 2020 at 4:42 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Innovation, Natural Resources

Learn About These Scientists' Research at UC Davis Seminar

The spotted wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii, is one of the flies that Joanna Chiu, vice chair of the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology, studies. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology's seminar on Wednesday, Feb. 26 will feature six “Faculty Flash Talks” on topics...

The spotted wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii, is one of the flies that Joanna Chiu, vice chair of the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology, studies. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The spotted wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii, is one of the flies that Joanna Chiu, vice chair of the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology, studies. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The spotted wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii, is one of the flies that Joanna Chiu, vice chair of the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology, studies. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A digger bee, Anthophora bomboides stanfordiana, heads back to her nest at Bodega Bay. This is one of the pollinators that Rachael Vannette, assistant professor, UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology, studies. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A digger bee, Anthophora bomboides stanfordiana, heads back to her nest at Bodega Bay. This is one of the pollinators that Rachael Vannette, assistant professor, UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology, studies. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A digger bee, Anthophora bomboides stanfordiana, heads back to her nest at Bodega Bay. This is one of the pollinators that Rachael Vannette, assistant professor, UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology, studies. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis medical entomologist-geneticist Geoffrey Attardo studies the tsetse fly. (Photo by Geoffey Attardo)
UC Davis medical entomologist-geneticist Geoffrey Attardo studies the tsetse fly. (Photo by Geoffey Attardo)

UC Davis medical entomologist-geneticist Geoffrey Attardo studies the tsetse fly. (Photo by Geoffey Attardo)

Arathi Seshadri and Julia Fine of the USDA-ARS bee facility aim to improve honey bee survival and beekeeping sustainability in California and nationwide. Here a honey bee forages on a Spanish lavender. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Arathi Seshadri and Julia Fine of the USDA-ARS bee facility aim to improve honey bee survival and beekeeping sustainability in California and nationwide. Here a honey bee forages on a Spanish lavender. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Arathi Seshadri and Julia Fine of the USDA-ARS bee facility aim to improve honey bee survival and beekeeping sustainability in California and nationwide. Here a honey bee forages on a Spanish lavender. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This is a trapdoor spider, Aptostichus sp.,one of the species that Jason Bond, Schlinger Chair in Insect Systematics, studies. (Photo by Jason Bond)
This is a trapdoor spider, Aptostichus sp.,one of the species that Jason Bond, Schlinger Chair in Insect Systematics, studies. (Photo by Jason Bond)

This is a trapdoor spider, Aptostichus sp.,one of the species that Jason Bond, Schlinger Chair in Insect Systematics, studies. (Photo by Jason Bond)

Posted on Monday, February 24, 2020 at 5:58 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Economic Development, Environment, Innovation, Natural Resources, Pest Management, Yard & Garden

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