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Posts Tagged: Bohart Museum of Entomology

Bohart Museum Virtual Open House: Got a Question About Wasps?

This is the Asian giant hornet, Vespa mandarinia, that was detected and destroyed on Vancouver Island, British Columbia, in September 2019. (Photo courtesy of the Washington State Department of Agriculture)

Do you have a question about wasps? Lynn Kimsey, director of the Bohart Museum of Entomology and UC Davis professor of...

This is the Asian giant hornet, Vespa mandarinia, that was detected and destroyed on Vancouver Island, British Columbia, in September 2019. (Photo courtesy of the Washington State Department of Agriculture)
This is the Asian giant hornet, Vespa mandarinia, that was detected and destroyed on Vancouver Island, British Columbia, in September 2019. (Photo courtesy of the Washington State Department of Agriculture)

This is the Asian giant hornet, Vespa mandarinia, that was detected and destroyed on Vancouver Island, British Columbia, in September 2019. (Photo courtesy of the Washington State Department of Agriculture)

This is an illustration that appears in the current edition of the journal Insect Systematics and Diversity.  It is the work of Allan Smith-Pardo of USDA.
This is an illustration that appears in the current edition of the journal Insect Systematics and Diversity. It is the work of Allan Smith-Pardo of USDA.

This is an illustration that appears in the current edition of the journal Insect Systematics and Diversity. It is the work of Allan Smith-Pardo of USDA.

The Hornet Wars: 'A Bloody Dumpster Fire'

Entomologist Doug Yanega of UC Riverside shows two Asian giant hornets, one of which is from the colony detected and killed on Vancouver Island, British Columbia. He was sought out to identify the species.

The news stories and social media comments about the Asian giant hornet detected last year in British Columbia and Washington state and labeled...

Entomologist Doug Yanega of UC Riverside shows two Asian giant hornets, one of which is from the colony detected and killed on Vancouver Island, British Columbia. He was sought out to identify the species.
Entomologist Doug Yanega of UC Riverside shows two Asian giant hornets, one of which is from the colony detected and killed on Vancouver Island, British Columbia. He was sought out to identify the species.

Entomologist Doug Yanega of UC Riverside shows two Asian giant hornets, one of which is from the colony detected and killed on Vancouver Island, British Columbia. He was sought out to identify the species.

This image of an Asian giant hornet, Vespa mandarina, is courtesy of the Washington State Department of Agriculture. The beekeeping industry is concerned about sightings, confirmed and unconfirmed,  of this insect in British Columbia and Washington state.
This image of an Asian giant hornet, Vespa mandarina, is courtesy of the Washington State Department of Agriculture. The beekeeping industry is concerned about sightings, confirmed and unconfirmed, of this insect in British Columbia and Washington state.

This image of an Asian giant hornet, Vespa mandarina, is courtesy of the Washington State Department of Agriculture. The beekeeping industry is concerned about sightings, confirmed and unconfirmed, of this insect in British Columbia and Washington state.

About Those Asian Giant Hornets...

An Asian giant hornet from Blaine, Wash., to be published n the journal, Insect Systematics and Diversity.  (Photo by Allan Smith-Pardo of the USDA)

The sensationalism. fear-mongering and general panic surrounding those Asian giant hornets, aka "murder hornets," detected last year in British...

An Asian giant hornet from Blaine, Wash., to be published n the journal, Insect Systematics and Diversity.  (Photo by Allan Smith-Pardo of the USDA)
An Asian giant hornet from Blaine, Wash., to be published n the journal, Insect Systematics and Diversity. (Photo by Allan Smith-Pardo of the USDA)

An Asian giant hornet from Blaine, Wash., to be published n the journal, Insect Systematics and Diversity. (Photo by Allan Smith-Pardo of the USDA)

Two Bees: A Close Encounter with a Cousin

A honey bee, Apis mellifera, buzzes over the head of a male Valley carpenter bee, Xylocopa varipuncta, on a tower of jewels, Echium wildpretii. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

So here I am, a male Valley carpenter bee, Xylocopa varipuncta, just enjoying the nectar on this tower of jewels, Echium wildpretii, in...

A honey bee, Apis mellifera, buzzes over the head of a male Valley carpenter bee, Xylocopa varipuncta, on a tower of jewels, Echium wildpretii. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A honey bee, Apis mellifera, buzzes over the head of a male Valley carpenter bee, Xylocopa varipuncta, on a tower of jewels, Echium wildpretii. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee, Apis mellifera, buzzes over the head of a male Valley carpenter bee, Xylocopa varipuncta, on a tower of jewels, Echium wildpretii. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The honey bee's feet touches the antennae of the male Valley carpenter bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The honey bee's feet touches the antennae of the male Valley carpenter bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The honey bee's feet touches the antennae of the male Valley carpenter bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The honey bee's abdomen touches the head of the male Valley carpenter bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The honey bee's abdomen touches the head of the male Valley carpenter bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The honey bee's abdomen touches the head of the male Valley carpenter bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Up, up and away. Off to the next blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Up, up and away. Off to the next blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Up, up and away. Off to the next blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Watch out, Mr. Carpenter Bee, I'm coming back down. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Watch out, Mr. Carpenter Bee, I'm coming back down. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Watch out, Mr. Carpenter Bee, I'm coming back down. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

You're crowding me, Ms. Honey Bee! (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
You're crowding me, Ms. Honey Bee! (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

You're crowding me, Ms. Honey Bee! (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

I'm outta here, says the carpenter bee to the honey bee. Take it all, it's yours. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
I'm outta here, says the carpenter bee to the honey bee. Take it all, it's yours. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

I'm outta here, says the carpenter bee to the honey bee. Take it all, it's yours. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis: Where to Learn About Insects and How to Collect Them

Swallowtail butterflies at the Bohart Museum of Entomology. Entomologist Jeff Smith, curator of the Lepidoptera section, says these are the Ulysses swallowtail – Papilio ulysses – that were collected in New Guinea, mostly by senior museum scientist Steve Heydon.

Life, as we know it, changed rapidly with the onset of the coronavirus pandemic. As you shelter in and look for something intriguing to do, would...

Swallowtail butterflies at the Bohart Museum of Entomology. Entomologist Jeff Smith, curator of the Lepidoptera section, says these are the Ulysses swallowtail – Papilio ulysses – that were collected in New Guinea, mostly by senior museum scientist Steve Heydon.
Swallowtail butterflies at the Bohart Museum of Entomology. Entomologist Jeff Smith, curator of the Lepidoptera section, says these are the Ulysses swallowtail – Papilio ulysses – that were collected in New Guinea, mostly by senior museum scientist Steve Heydon. "They are also found in Queensland, Australia, and some islands of Indonesia. It is one of those iconic butterflies that is often pictured in ads and other media because of its spectacular color." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Swallowtail butterflies at the Bohart Museum of Entomology. Entomologist Jeff Smith, curator of the Lepidoptera section, says these are the Ulysses swallowtail – Papilio ulysses – that were collected in New Guinea, mostly by senior museum scientist Steve Heydon. "They are also found in Queensland, Australia, and some islands of Indonesia. It is one of those iconic butterflies that is often pictured in ads and other media because of its spectacular color." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The European wool carder bee is the subject of one of the Bohart Museum online fact sheets, written by director Lynn Kimsey. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The European wool carder bee is the subject of one of the Bohart Museum online fact sheets, written by director Lynn Kimsey. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The European wool carder bee is the subject of one of the Bohart Museum online fact sheets, written by director Lynn Kimsey. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

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