Capitol Corridor
University of California
Capitol Corridor

UC Blogs

A Grand Opening--And Bees Were Nowhere in Sight

Ready to cut the ribbon (from left) are almond pollination consultant Robert Curtis of Carmichael, retired  director of agricultural affairs, Almond Board of California; Brad Pankratz of Can-Am Apiaries, Orland; Jackie Parks-Burris of Jackie Park-Burris Queen Bees, Palo Cedro and a past president of California State Beekeepers' Association; Darren Cox, Logan, Utah, past president of American Honey Producers;  and Kelvin Adee of Bruce, S.D., president of American Honey Producers.

It was a grand opening of the USDA-ARS bee research facility at the University of California, Davis, but the bees were nowhere in sight. That's...

Ready to cut the ribbon (from left) are almond pollination consultant Robert Curtis of Carmichael, retired  director of agricultural affairs, Almond Board of California; Brad Pankratz of Can-Am Apiaries, Orland; Jackie Parks-Burris of Jackie Park-Burris Queen Bees, Palo Cedro and a past president of California State Beekeepers' Association; Darren Cox, Logan, Utah, past president of American Honey Producers;  and Kelvin Adee of Bruce, S.D., president of American Honey Producers.
Ready to cut the ribbon (from left) are almond pollination consultant Robert Curtis of Carmichael, retired director of agricultural affairs, Almond Board of California; Brad Pankratz of Can-Am Apiaries, Orland; Jackie Parks-Burris of Jackie Park-Burris Queen Bees, Palo Cedro and a past president of California State Beekeepers' Association; Darren Cox, Logan, Utah, past president of American Honey Producers; and Kelvin Adee of Bruce, S.D., president of American Honey Producers.

Ready to cut the ribbon (from left) are almond pollination consultant Robert Curtis of Carmichael, retired director of agricultural affairs, Almond Board of California; Brad Pankratz of Can-Am Apiaries, Orland; Jackie Parks-Burris of Jackie Park-Burris Queen Bees, Palo Cedro and a past president of California State Beekeepers' Association; Darren Cox, Logan, Utah, past president of American Honey Producers; and Kelvin Adee of Bruce, S.D., president of American Honey Producers.

And it's snipped!  From left are almond pollination consultant Robert Curtis of Carmichael, retired  director of agricultural affairs, Almond Board of California; Brad Pankratz of Can-Am Apiaries, Orland; Jackie Parks-Burris of Jackie Park-Burris Queen Bees, Palo Cedro and a past president of California State Beekeepers' Association; Darren Cox, Logan, Utah, past president of American Honey Producers;  and Kelvin Adee of Bruce, S.D., president of American Honey Producers.
And it's snipped! From left are almond pollination consultant Robert Curtis of Carmichael, retired director of agricultural affairs, Almond Board of California; Brad Pankratz of Can-Am Apiaries, Orland; Jackie Parks-Burris of Jackie Park-Burris Queen Bees, Palo Cedro and a past president of California State Beekeepers' Association; Darren Cox, Logan, Utah, past president of American Honey Producers; and Kelvin Adee of Bruce, S.D., president of American Honey Producers.

And it's snipped! From left are almond pollination consultant Robert Curtis of Carmichael, retired director of agricultural affairs, Almond Board of California; Brad Pankratz of Can-Am Apiaries, Orland; Jackie Parks-Burris of Jackie Park-Burris Queen Bees, Palo Cedro and a past president of California State Beekeepers' Association; Darren Cox, Logan, Utah, past president of American Honey Producers; and Kelvin Adee of Bruce, S.D., president of American Honey Producers.

California State Beekeepers' Association members pose for a photo. From left are Steve Godlin, Jackie Park-Burris, Valeri Severson, Brad Pankratz, Buzz Landon, Brooke Palmer, and Trevor Tauzer.
California State Beekeepers' Association members pose for a photo. From left are Steve Godlin, Jackie Park-Burris, Valeri Severson, Brad Pankratz, Buzz Landon, Brooke Palmer, and Trevor Tauzer.

California State Beekeepers' Association members pose for a photo. From left are Steve Godlin, Jackie Park-Burris, Valeri Severson, Brad Pankratz, Buzz Landon, Brooke Palmer, and Trevor Tauzer.

The American Honey Producers Association with the ribbon. Wielding the scissors is Kelvin Adee of Bruce, S.D., president of American Honey Producers. The group later held a conference in Sacramento.
The American Honey Producers Association with the ribbon. Wielding the scissors is Kelvin Adee of Bruce, S.D., president of American Honey Producers. The group later held a conference in Sacramento.

The American Honey Producers Association with the ribbon. Wielding the scissors is Kelvin Adee of Bruce, S.D., president of American Honey Producers. The group later held a conference in Sacramento.

UC Davis-affiliated personnel pose with USDA personnel for a ribbon-cutting photo. From left are Charley Nye, UC Davis; Paul Pratt of USDA; Kevin Hackett of USDA; Anita Oberbauer of UC Davis; Eric Mussen of UC Davis; Robert Matteri of USDA; Neal Williams, Brian Johnson, Elina Niño  and Bernardo Niño, all of UC Davis; and Julia Fine and Arathi Seshadri, USDA.
UC Davis-affiliated personnel pose with USDA personnel for a ribbon-cutting photo. From left are Charley Nye, UC Davis; Paul Pratt of USDA; Kevin Hackett of USDA; Anita Oberbauer of UC Davis; Eric Mussen of UC Davis; Robert Matteri of USDA; Neal Williams, Brian Johnson, Elina Niño and Bernardo Niño, all of UC Davis; and Julia Fine and Arathi Seshadri, USDA.

UC Davis-affiliated personnel pose with USDA personnel for a ribbon-cutting photo. From left are Charley Nye, UC Davis; Paul Pratt of USDA; Kevin Hackett of USDA; Anita Oberbauer of UC Davis; Eric Mussen of UC Davis; Robert Matteri of USDA; Neal Williams, Brian Johnson, Elina Niño and Bernardo Niño, all of UC Davis; and Julia Fine and Arathi Seshadri, USDA.

Much collaboration, cooperation, and camaraderie is expected here at the newly opened USDA-ARS bee research facility on Bee Biology Road, UC Davis.
Much collaboration, cooperation, and camaraderie is expected here at the newly opened USDA-ARS bee research facility on Bee Biology Road, UC Davis.

Much collaboration, cooperation, and camaraderie is expected here at the newly opened USDA-ARS bee research facility on Bee Biology Road, UC Davis.

Something Wonderful Is Happening Saturday, Jan. 18 at Bohart Museum of Entomology

Zachary Griebenow, shown here at UC Davis Picnic Day, will present his research on ants at the Bohart Museum of Entomology open house. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Something Wonderful Is Happening Saturday, Jan. 18 at Bohart Museum of Entomology! If you're a student and thinking about a science career, this is...

Zachary Griebenow, shown here at UC Davis Picnic Day, will present his research on ants at the Bohart Museum of Entomology open house. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Zachary Griebenow, shown here at UC Davis Picnic Day, will present his research on ants at the Bohart Museum of Entomology open house. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Zachary Griebenow, shown here at UC Davis Picnic Day, will present his research on ants at the Bohart Museum of Entomology open house. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Forensic entomologist Alexander Dedmon is enthusiastic about his research. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Forensic entomologist Alexander Dedmon is enthusiastic about his research. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Forensic entomologist Alexander Dedmon is enthusiastic about his research. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Doctoral Yao Cai (left) (shown here with undergraduate student Christopher Ocoa, will discuss his circadian clock research on fruit flies and monarch butterflies. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Doctoral Yao Cai (left) (shown here with undergraduate student Christopher Ocoa, will discuss his circadian clock research on fruit flies and monarch butterflies. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Doctoral Yao Cai (left) (shown here with undergraduate student Christopher Ocoa, will discuss his circadian clock research on fruit flies and monarch butterflies. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Charlotte Alberts studies assassin flies and also draws them! This is an Ommatius amula with prey.
Charlotte Alberts studies assassin flies and also draws them! This is an Ommatius amula with prey.

Charlotte Alberts studies assassin flies and also draws them! This is an Ommatius amula with prey.

Forest entomologist Crystal Homicz will talk about bark beetles. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Forest entomologist Crystal Homicz will talk about bark beetles. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Forest entomologist Crystal Homicz will talk about bark beetles. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Giving Thanks

It was one of the last summer days – sunny with only the slightest nip in the air.  Perfect weather to look over my garden and enjoy the remaining flowers and veggies and look forward to next year.  Rather suddenly our mastiff, a reliable beacon of activity around the perimeter of our house, began to put out a ruckus.  I went to the front door but before I opened it I realized that the dog, Millie is her name, was looking up the street rather than out front.  I followed her head and there were 3 turkeys coming up the driveway.  That was fun. So I went out the back of the house to get a better view trying to stay out of sight enough to not disturb them.

I have a very full wisteria growing on an arbor along the roofline and I snuck near it off the back of the house.  Millie didn't come outside but made her presence known and made sure I didn't miss the presence of our visitors.  As I backed away from the house I could see one turkey above the wisteria.  Then there was an increasing clatter.  The alpha turkey headed off, I thought to go to my neighbor's roof, but actually going over our property to a greenway next to our back fence.  And then there was a din of flapping, squawking, and barking to beat the band and a flock (if that is what one calls a group of turkeys) often lined up on the roof and one by one took off to the greenway.  They landed and noisily took off on foot into the grasses.

Then all was quiet, Millie's job was done.; she had a drink and went to sleep.  We both had a snack and I went back to weeding.  Nature was good to us.  Harbinger of the holiday season to come.

turkeys in wisteria lowell cooper 2019
turkeys in wisteria lowell cooper 2019

Posted on Tuesday, January 14, 2020 at 9:01 AM

Bohart Museum Open House: What Insects Do Bats Eat?

Mexican free-tailed bats leaving Yolo Causeway at dusk on Sept. 10, 2019. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

When you watch bats emerge at dusk in the summer from the Yolo Causeway, have you ever wondered what insects they eat? UC Davis doctoral candidate...

Mexican free-tailed bats leaving Yolo Causeway at dusk on Sept. 10, 2019. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Mexican free-tailed bats leaving Yolo Causeway at dusk on Sept. 10, 2019. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Mexican free-tailed batsleaving Yolo Causeway at dusk on Sept. 10, 2019. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Mexican free-tailed bats ready to catch insects at the Yolo Causeway. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Mexican free-tailed bats ready to catch insects at the Yolo Causeway. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Mexican free-tailed bats ready to catch insects at the Yolo Causeway. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Thousands of bats nest in the Yolo Causeway during the summer. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Thousands of bats nest in the Yolo Causeway during the summer. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Thousands of bats nest in the Yolo Causeway during the summer. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This is an image of a bat that Ann Holmes studies. (Photo by Shayan Kaveh)
This is an image of a bat that Ann Holmes studies. (Photo by Shayan Kaveh)

This is an image of a bat that Ann Holmes studies. (Photo by Shayan Kaveh)

Mary Farmar Elementary School Garden

It was a great day at the Mary Farmar school garden!

Every time I sign up for Master Gardener events, I get excited about getting out and working with my community alongside fellow Master Gardeners.  Even if I don't know anyone at each event, I always feel so connected to the folks that I find to be kindred spirits, driven by a love for all things about gardening and sustainability.

I would like to share my most recent Master Gardener volunteer adventure at the Mary Farmer School Garden in Benicia. We had a great day out in the garden that day!  I had seen the volunteer opportunity posted on the Master Gardener website but did not have free time until recently. When I arrived at the event, I was greeted warmly by Sheila Clyatt and the other Master Gardeners who were dedicating their time to the school garden.

This spectacular garden was created over 10 years ago, and is managed by Sheila Clyatt (Solano County Master Gardener) and Christine Linder, the Vice-president of Volunteers for Mary Farmar's PTA.  Sheila and Christine are joined by dedicated Master Gardeners, Mary Farmar PTA, and community volunteers.  

Volunteers support students that are in the first through fifth grades who visit the garden. These students come to the garden to experience hands-on activities, such as composting with worms; planting seeds, bulbs, plants, trees; growing and harvesting fruits and veggies.  The students also learn about pollinators, native plants, and sustainability.

On that day I helped out, Sheila quickly briefed the Master Gardener volunteers on activities for the event.  My activity station was the first of three, which had students learning about worm composting.  I gave the students a brief explanation about the worm composting (crash course from Sheila). Each student then made a bed of layered paper strips and soil for each worm that was placed into the main worm composting bin. 

Each student was given a small cup and some newspaper to tear into small strips to place in the cup. Then they added some soil, picked a worm out of a worm bin, then brought it to the next station where they added food for the worm (fruit and veggies that volunteers had chopped up). The students then placed the whole “worm bed” into the worm composting bin.  They seemed so pleased to be a part of this process for expanding the composting bin for use in their garden!

I noticed that most students seemed to gravitate to the soil naturally, wanting to smell, touch and feel the earth in their hands. To my delight, most of the students were more than happy to gently choose a worm out of the bin to place into their new “worm bed”.

If the students were not interested in worm composting, there were plenty of other activities, such as hands-on learning about Buffy the chicken and potting daffodils or succulent cuttings for their teachers!  What a magical garden!

Christine Linder, the VP of Volunteers for Mary Farmar's PTA is trying to increase awareness and parent involvement in the Mary Farmar school garden.  So, please join the Mary Farmar Garden Facebook Group for weekly updates from the garden. https://www.facebook.com/groups/569982193758936/

Prepping for students.
Prepping for students.

Pick a worm!
Pick a worm!

I have a worm!
I have a worm!

Posted on Monday, January 13, 2020 at 3:48 PM

First storyPrevious 5 stories  |  Next 5 stories | Last story

 
E-mail
 
Webmaster Email: kmchurchill@ucanr.edu