Capitol Corridor
University of California
Capitol Corridor

Posts Tagged: UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology

Meet Your Entomologists Who Study Everything from Soapberry Bugs to Monarchs

The focus is on soapberry bugs in this collage by evolutionary ecologist Scott Carroll. Doctoral candidate Meredith Cenzer will speak on her research on Oct. 5.

A good place to meet entomologists and learn about what they're researching is at seminars. The UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology has...

The focus is on soapberry bugs in this collage by evolutionary ecologist Scott Carroll. Doctoral candidate Meredith Cenzer will speak on her research on Oct. 5.
The focus is on soapberry bugs in this collage by evolutionary ecologist Scott Carroll. Doctoral candidate Meredith Cenzer will speak on her research on Oct. 5.

The focus is on soapberry bugs in this collage by evolutionary ecologist Scott Carroll. Doctoral candidate Meredith Cenzer will speak on her research on Oct. 5.

Posted on Friday, September 23, 2016 at 4:56 PM

From Caterpillars to Butterflies to Chronic Pain Research

This photo of Gulf Fritillary adults and a caterpillar helps illustrate the article on the Medical College of Wisconsin website. Bruce Hammock's basic research on how caterpillars become butterflies led to discoveries on chronic pain. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

"Science is full of surprises." Bruce Hammock, UC Davis distinguished professor of entomology who holds a joint appointment with the UC Davis...

This photo of Gulf Fritillary adults and a caterpillar helps illustrate the article on the Medical College of Wisconsin website. Bruce Hammock's basic research on how caterpillars become butterflies led to discoveries on chronic pain. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
This photo of Gulf Fritillary adults and a caterpillar helps illustrate the article on the Medical College of Wisconsin website. Bruce Hammock's basic research on how caterpillars become butterflies led to discoveries on chronic pain. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This photo of Gulf Fritillary adults and a caterpillar helps illustrate the article on the Medical College of Wisconsin website. Bruce Hammock's basic research on how caterpillars become butterflies led to discoveries on chronic pain. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

What's Better than Sighting a Bumble Bee?

A newly emerged yellow-faced bumble bee queen, Bombus vosnesenskii, eyes the photographer as it forages on blanket flower (Gaillardia). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

What's better than sighting a yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii? Well, a newly emerged Bombus vosnesenskii queen. On the last day of...

A newly emerged yellow-faced bumble bee queen, Bombus vosnesenskii, eyes the photographer as it forages on blanket flower (Gaillardia). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A newly emerged yellow-faced bumble bee queen, Bombus vosnesenskii, eyes the photographer as it forages on blanket flower (Gaillardia). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A newly emerged yellow-faced bumble bee queen, Bombus vosnesenskii, eyes the photographer as it forages on blanket flower (Gaillardia). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Yellow-faced bumble bee shows its distinguishing marks. This is a queen Bombus vosnesenskii, about 21mm long. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Yellow-faced bumble bee shows its distinguishing marks. This is a queen Bombus vosnesenskii, about 21mm long. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Yellow-faced bumble bee shows its distinguishing marks. This is a queen Bombus vosnesenskii, about 21mm long. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Up and away! A distinguishing feature of Bombus vosnesenskii is the yellow stripe, T4 segment of its thorax. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Up and away! A distinguishing feature of Bombus vosnesenskii is the yellow stripe, T4 segment of its thorax. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Up and away! A distinguishing feature of Bombus vosnesenskii is the yellow stripe, T4 segment of its thorax. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The Eighth Wonder of the World

A feral honey bee colony, with exposed comb, on a Eucalyptus tree in Vacaville. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It's time to add an “eighth wonder” to the Seven Wonders of the (Ancient) World: a feral honey bee colony. One with exposed comb. Many...

A feral honey bee colony, with exposed comb, on a Eucalyptus tree in Vacaville. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A feral honey bee colony, with exposed comb, on a Eucalyptus tree in Vacaville. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A feral honey bee colony, with exposed comb, on a Eucalyptus tree in Vacaville. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Another view of the feral honey bee colony. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Another view of the feral honey bee colony. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Another view of the feral honey bee colony. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-up of bees in the feral colony. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Close-up of bees in the feral colony. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-up of bees in the feral colony. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The feral honey bee colony is thriving. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The feral honey bee colony is thriving. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The feral honey bee colony is thriving. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Christine Merlin: Why Those Monarchs Migrate When They Do

Texas A&M University biologist Christine Merlin examines a monarch. (Photo courtesy of Texas A&M University)

(Editor's Note: Due to unforeseen circumstances, Christine Merlin cancelled this seminar but it will be rescheduled sometime next year.) From her...

Texas A&M University biologist Christine Merlin examines a monarch. (Photo courtesy of Texas A&M University)
Texas A&M University biologist Christine Merlin examines a monarch. (Photo courtesy of Texas A&M University)

Texas A&M University biologist Christine Merlin examines a monarch. (Photo courtesy of Texas A&M University)

Posted on Thursday, May 26, 2016 at 3:54 PM

First storyPrevious 5 stories  |  Next 5 stories | Last story

 
E-mail
 
Webmaster Email: kmchurchill@ucanr.edu