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Posts Tagged: Niamh Quinn

ANR in the news April 16-30, 2020

Dawn Kooyumjian is interviewed by KCBS reporter Matt Biglar about the UC Master Gardeners in Contra Costa County donating plants to Oakland students.

Coronavirus's next victim: Big Meat

(Grist) Nathanael Johnson, April 30

“It's going to cause price spikes somewhere downstream,” said Rich Sexton, an agricultural economist at the University of California, Davis. But the average shopper might only notice empty shelves rather than higher prices, because “big grocery chains don't like to jack up prices, especially in times like this.”

…“There is going to be even more of a rush to automate farmwork and slaughterhouses,” Sexton said.

https://grist.org/food/coronaviruss-next-victim-big-meat/

As meat plants idle, California has no shortage of fish, dairy

(NBC News) Dennis Romero, April 29

…California produces about 20 percent of the nation's milk and has a large poultry processor in Foster Farms, but is otherwise dependent on the Midwest for pork and much of its beef, according to Daniel Sumner, director of the University of California's Agricultural Issues Center.

The state slaughters dairy cows for hamburger and raises calves for beef. But the 1-year-old livestock is sent to the Midwest for corn and soy feeding before being processed for beef there, he said. "We've never produced any hogs to speak of," Sumner added.

California producers fill nearly half the state's chicken and egg demand, he said.

https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/meat-plants-idle-california-has-no-shortage-fish-dairy-n1194906

1-In-4 San Diegans Unemployed From Pandemic, North County Wants Businesses To Reopen, San Diego Sees Drop In Homelessness, And Online Learning Nightmare For Vets

(KPBS Midday Edition) Maureen Cavanaugh and Jade Hindmon, April 29

An estimated 25% of San Diegans are out of work because of the pandemic, according to a new SANDAG report. Plus, a handful of North County mayors want businesses in their towns to reopen sooner rather than later. Also, homelessness in San Diego is seeing a decline, according to the latest homeless count. Also, it's not just young students who are having a hard time with distance learning, veteran students are also dealing with the challenges of virtual classrooms. ... Finally, growing your own veggies? Some gardening tips from a master gardener. [UC Master Gardener Sommer Cartier discusses a new website to help gardeners https://www.mastergardenersd.org/lets-grow-together-san-diego/.]

https://www.kpbs.org/news/midday-edition/

Virus-related food shortages will be temporary in U.S., experts say

(Farm Press) Tim Hearden, April 29

…“Every economist agrees that the massive hit to the world economy and trade will likely cause millions of very poor people to be out of work and with no income,” said agricultural economist Daniel Sumner, director of the University of California's Agricultural Issues Center. “This is a consequence of the disease, but also of the policy of shutting down the economy.

“In poor countries, when the economy is shut down, the poorest people get even more hungry and people die, especially the kids,” Sumner said in an email.

https://www.farmprogress.com/farm-business/virus-related-food-shortages-will-be-temporary-us-experts-say

'We're in pretty good shape' | Northern California unlikely to see meat shortage

(ABC10) Lena Howland, April 29

… Despite the ad Tyson Foods released over the weekend, saying the food supply chain in America is breaking, UC Davis Professor Daniel Sumner said we could expect to see some higher prices, but he doesn't expect to see shelves being wiped out anytime soon.

"If you want to have some very specialized meat product, you may find that in short supply in your local market on the day you're shopping, if you went back the next day, it may be there, but I don't think anybody has to worry about the supply chain in America, we're in pretty good shape," Sumner said.

And he said the only way we will see a shortage is if people panic buy, just like they did with toilet paper.

"As we've learned in the past month or two, you could certainly create a shortage in the sense that consumers can altogether if we all ran out and decided to stock up every freezer space that we have with steaks and pork chops," Summer said.

https://www.abc10.com/article/news/health/coronavirus/northern-california-unlikely-to-see-meat-shortage/103-75dfef60-0fbd-455f-952b-58d70de96ea1

Nature And The Coronavirus: As Humans Continue Lockdown, Wildlife Creeps Back In

(On Point NPR) Brittany Knotts and Meghna Chakrabarti, April 29

Humanity in lockdown. Wildlife creeps back into cities around the world. We look at the pandemic from the animal kingdom's point of view.

Guests: Niamh Quinn, human-wildlife interactions advisor for the University of California Cooperative's South Coast Research and Extension Center. (@niamhnichuinn)

https://www.wbur.org/onpoint/2020/04/29/wildlife-coronavirus-animals-climate

Scientist at work: Trapping urban coyotes to see if they can be 'hazed' away from human neighborhoods

(Conversation) Niamh Quinn, April 29

After weeks of sleepless nights spent scrutinizing grainy images relayed from our remote cameras, mostly of waving grass and tumbling leaves, finally, there it is. A live coyote with a loop around its neck. On October 8, 2019, my colleagues and I caught the first member of the University of California Agriculture and Natural Resources pack, #19CU001.

https://www.fairfieldcitizenonline.com/news/article/Scientist-at-work-Trapping-urban-coyotes-to-see-15233700.php

Coronavirus: Should California brace for a meat shortage? Not exactly, say industry experts

(SF Chronicle) Esther Mobley, April 28

… There's not a shortage, exactly, say industry experts, though interruptions to the supply chain mean that it's taking a little longer than usual for meat to get from a farm to your grocery store shelf.

“We will have a short period where we have fewer packages of meat in the case,” said Daniel A. Sumner, director of the University of California Agricultural Issues Center. It will be an inconvenience, he said: “Let's say you like thin-cut pork chops, I like thick-cut pork chops. Well, one of us will be disappointed if we shop late in the day.”

https://www.sfchronicle.com/food/article/Should-California-brace-for-a-meat-shortage-Not-15232223.php

Carbon Sequestration in Vineyards

(AgInfo) Tim Hammerich, April 27

...However, Extension Specialist Kaan Kurtural and his team at the Oakville Experiment Station are currently evaluating the impact cover crops can have on carbon sequestration in vineyards.

Kurtural…”Growers came to us. A couple of the questions they had was how can we sequester the carbon and how can we mitigate the amount of greenhouse gases we emit from the vineyards? So that was some background work done on it. Cover crops do sequester carbon and will store it in the soil. But as you till them, if you till the row middles, all this stuff is release back into the atmosphere. So we worked with a couple of private companies and we were able to get this new type of cover crop using a perennial system. Meaning that it doesn't have to be tilled or mowed, it just goes dormant. So we're comparing now till versus no-till systems using perennial and annual cover crops. So that's how that began.”

https://www.aginfo.net/report/45829/California-Ag-Today/Carbon-Sequestration-in-Vineyards

Covid-19 has forced large-scale farms that supply institutions to dump produce they can't sell. Why can't it just feed hungry people ? We've got answers.

(Counter) Lela Nargi, April 27

To get a clearer understanding of where institutional food comes from, why kinks at the center of the supply chain make rerouting a challenge, and what's being done to change that, I talked to a variety of agriculture experts.

Dr. Gail Feenstra, deputy director, Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education Program, University of California Davis: Our food system generally is built for global distribution. Now that's suddenly cracked, people are going back to more local food systems, where [important middle-tier components] like storage facilities [for meat and grain] aren't available.

Feenstra: In California, some new food hubs are starting up to make the connection between small- and mid-scale famers with excess, and consumers who use CalFresh/SNAP. There's also work being done to figure out how to change CSAs to direct delivery or drop-off. Who is making these connections are co-op extension service agents, in every county in the U.S. They can share resources and research, and have access to grant monies. One agent told me she worked with county board supervisors to keep farmers' markets open, then with market managers to reorganize to keep the markets safe.

https://thecounter.org/covid-19-produce-dumping-food-banks/

COVID-19 outbreak causing possible meat shortage across US

(KRON4) Dan Thorn, April 26

…“That doesn't seem to be on the horizon yet… but we have had some disruptions,” Daniel Summer said.

Those disruptions, says Daniel Sumner — a U.C. Davis agricultural economist — will not create a shortage of meat.

Even after the country's largest meat producers including Tyson, along Smithfield and JBS have recently shuttered processing plants.

“You and I may see our favorite supermarket low on something but there will be plenty of meat –beef, pork and chicken that we all like there will be plenty of meat in the supermarkets,” Summer said.

https://www.kron4.com/news/bay-area/covid-19-outbreak-causing-possible-meat-shortage-across-us/

Marin farm sector struggles as virus cripples food services

(Marin IJ) Richard Halstead, April 26

… Randi Black, a University of California Cooperative Extension dairy adviser for Marin County, said, “We're kind of lucky where we are. We haven't been impacted quite as much as some of the eastern U.S. dairies have been. That's where we're seeing a lot of milk dumping.”

Black said that is because processors who buy Marin dairy farmers' milk sell most of their milk to grocery stores, while processors in the east rely more heavily on the food-services industry, which includes restaurants, hotels and airlines.

https://www.marinij.com/2020/04/26/marin-farm-sector-struggles-as-virus-cripples-food-services/

Want to save your citrus trees? Start a full-fledged insect war

(Los Angeles Times) Jeanette Marantos, April 25

…In citrus-loving California, some 60% of homes already have one or more citrus trees in their yard, said UC Riverside entomologist Elizabeth Grafton-Cardwell, director of the Lindcove Research and Extension Center in Exeter. (That's a statewide average, with fewer in Northern California and more in Southern California, she said.)

…But Mark Hoddle, a biological control specialist at UC Riverside, sees things differently. Hoddle and his entomologist wife, Christina Hoddle, also at UC Riverside, went to Pakistan in 2010 looking for natural enemies of the Asian citrus psyllid, and there they found Tamarixia radiata, tiny parasitoid wasps that lay their eggs on the backs of psyllid toddlers (a.k.a. nymphs).

https://www.latimes.com/lifestyle/story/2020-04-24/how-to-save-your-citrus-from-hlb-disease

Even as new technologies revolutionize farming, not everyone has access

(Sac Biz Journal) Emily Hamann, April 24

Technology could hold the key to solving growers' issues both around labor and water.

George Zhuang, a farm adviser with the UC Cooperative Extension, works with wine grape growers in the Fresno region, where machines have largely taken over the job of growing grapes.

“Most newly established vineyards go to 100% mechanization,” Zhuang said.

https://www.bizjournals.com/sacramento/news/2020/04/24/even-as-new-technologies-revolutionize-farming-not.html

Amid rising costs and limited availability, farmers struggle to find enough workers

(Sac Biz Journal) Emily Hamann, April 24

…Wine grapes are known for being especially labor intensive. Grape harvesters have been commonplace in vineyards in the San Joaquin Valley for decades, but vines still needed maintenance, including pulling leaves and trimming shoots, by hand. Now that's changing as well, said Kaan Kurtural, viticulture specialist at the UC Davis.

…“We have a lot of consolidation in our business,” Kurtural said. “Vineyards are getting larger as farmers are getting old and their kids don't want to do this anymore, so they're selling their holdings.”

https://www.bizjournals.com/sacramento/news/2020/04/24/amid-rising-costs-and-limited-availability-farmers.html

A Strained Food Chain

(Health in all Matters) Michael Joyce, April 24

 COVID-19 has drastically disrupted the way food is produced, distributed, and available in the U.S. and around the world. The toll of the virus on those who plant, pick, buy, sell, and, at times, go hungry, is increasing. In this episode, we explore the vulnerabilities of a complex and interconnected food system and the inevitable bright spots along the way.

Guest: Daniel Sumner

https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/a-strained-food-chain/id1503590411?i=1000472557618

Farmers face new challenges in their ongoing quest for water

(Sac Biz Journal) Emily Hamann, April 24

…“Almond trees are actually pretty resilient,” said Katherine Jarvis-Shean, a Sacramento-area orchard farm advisor with the University of California Cooperative Extension.

While the trees themselves can live through a drought year, insufficient water will reduce yields for the present season and seasons into the future, Jarvis-Shean said.

But this year growers can also rely on groundwater pumped from wells drilled into a patchwork of underground aquifers.

“One year with low precipitation is not a problem with groundwater,” Jarvis-Shean said. “The problem is if we continue to have dry winters.”

https://www.bizjournals.com/sacramento/news/2020/04/24/farmers-face-new-challenges-in-their-ongoing-quest.html

Protecting The Valley's Vulnerable Populations From COVID-19

(KVPR) Kathleen Schock, April 24

COVID-19 is disproportionately hurting vulnerable communities like seniors, ag workers and the homeless. To learn about efforts to protect these at-risk populations, FM89's Kathleen Schock spoke with Lisa Blecker, pesticide safety education program coordinator for the UC Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources, Laura Moreno, chair of the Fresno Madera Continuum of Care, and Kristen Beall Watson, CEO of the Kern Community Foundation.

https://www.kvpr.org/post/protecting-valleys-vulnerable-populations-covid-19

Too celebratory for a pandemic, California's farmed oysters and caviar lose their markets

(San Francisco Chronicle) Janelle Bitker, April 24

…California's aquaculture industry, which includes farmed trout, clams and mussels in addition to higher-end abalone and oysters, represents about $200 million in annual sales, according to Jackson Gross, an aquaculture specialist at UC Davis.

…“Are people willing to pay for a premium local product?,” Gross said. “They're doing that at restaurants, but they're getting the frozen stuff from the big chain stores.”

https://www.sfchronicle.com/restaurants/article/Too-celebratory-for-a-pandemic-California-s-15222247.php

Stop stable flies from biting into profits

(Progressive Dairy) Julia Hollister, April 23

It only takes five stable flies biting on the front legs of a cow to reduce weight gains and milk yields, according to Alec Gerry, a University of California – Davis veterinary entomology specialist.

Gerry, who spoke at the 2020 Golden State Management Conference in Modesto, California, has been researching flies for over 25 years. His most recent studies are in collaboration with researchers at the Veterinary Medicine Teaching and Research Center in Tulare, California.

https://www.progressivedairy.com/topics/herd-health/stop-stable-flies-from-biting-into-profits

In The Quiet Of Sheltering In Place, Have You Encountered Wildlife Differently?

(KPCC ) Larry Mantle, April 23

As the quarantine continues, residents surrounding Griffith Park have shared that they're noticing more wildlife activity - hawk nests, deer in the hills, opossums on the roads. 

According to the Los Angeles Times, some wildlife biologists are saying what's changed isn't animal behavior but our own. We finally have the time and the patience to notice the wildlife around us. 

GUEST: Niamh Quinn, human-wildlife interactions advisor with the University of California's Cooperative Extension, a branch of the UC system which researches local issues; she tweets @niamhnichuinn

https://www.scpr.org/programs/airtalk/2020/04/23/65548/in-the-quiet-of-sheltering-in-place-have-you-encou/

Oakland Schools Use Gardening to Help Families

(KCBS radio) Matt Biglar, April 23

Canned food... diapers... tomato plants?
As KCBS Radio's Matt Bigler reports, Oakland schools are helping families get food and supplies and also get into gardening.

The plant giveaway came out of the Contra Costa Master Gardeners spring fundraiser, which unfortunately withered and died this season.

“But with the shelter in place order, we were unable to hold our plant sale.” Dawn Kooyumjian said, they decided to donate their seedlings to nearly 50 organizations, including Oakland Unified.

“People are able to come, pick up their necessities that the school district is providing, and also take home a vegetable plant that will allow them to have a little bit of food security in their home.

https://kcbsradio.radio.com/media/audio-channel/oakland-schools-use-gardening-to-help-families

The Great Potato Giveaway

(NPR) Stacey Vanek Smith, April 23

…Daniel Sumner is an agricultural economist at the University of California, Davis. He says the problem boils down to two things.

DANIEL SUMNER: How streamlined and specialized things are.

...SUMNER: The farmer will be linked directly to the restaurant customers and grow for that restaurant in San Francisco or New York City or somebody growing exactly the kind of lettuce that McDonald's needs for their hamburgers. That's been a great system.

https://www.npr.org/2020/04/23/843437140/the-great-potato-giveaway

Lockdown silver linings: For a Sacramento family, baby chickens bring meaning, solace

(Sac Bee) Diana Williams, April 22

…Imagine my delight in stumbling across a backyard chicken census online. It's overseen by Maurice Pitesky, a veterinarian and epidemiologist at the UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine-Cooperative Extension.

Pitesky's best guess is there are about 100,000 backyard flocks in California. Sacramento probably has about 11 percent of them, making ours the third-highest backyard chicken region in the state, behind Los Angeles and San Francisco.

https://www.sacbee.com/entertainment/living/article242190746.html

Volunteer program donates over 30,000 plants to community gardens in Contra Costa

(KRON4) Omar Perez, April 21

A volunteer program donates thousands of vegetable plants to local undeserved communities in the Bay Area free of charge. Over the last few weeks volunteers for The Contra Costa Master Gardeners Program donated more than 30,000 plants to local school and community gardens.

…“Because of COVID-19 they were not able to have the sale so they quickly decided they would distribute the plants for free to local communities, elderly and schools,” Bay Area Program Director Frank McPherson said.

https://www.kron4.com/features/kron4-heroes/volunteer-program-donates-over-30000-plants-to-local-school-and-community-gardens-in-contra-costa/

Coyotes, falcons, deer and other wildlife are reclaiming L.A. territory as humans stay at home

(LA Times) Louis Sahagun, April 21

Similarly, research scientist Niamh Quinn, who serves as human-wildlife interactions advisor for UC Cooperative Extension, said none of the five collared coyotes she is studying in the cities of Hacienda Heights, Roland Heights, La Verne and Chino Hills “have changed their behavior yet.”

“I do believe, however, that human behavior has been altered significantly by the lockdown in ways that are closing the gap between us and what's wild around our own homes — and that's great, up to a point,” she said.

She worries that animals may be pushed into closer conflicts with humans. “We have to interact with wildlife from a distance. That is because we still do not know all the diseases that, say, coyotes and rats carry with them.”

https://www.latimes.com/environment/story/2020-04-21/wildlife-thrives-amid-coronavirus-lockdown

A century later, victory gardens connect Americans again

(AP) Kristin M, Hall, April 21

… Creating a victory garden now can be, as it was during World Wars I and II, a shared experience during hardship and uncertainty.

“World War I, to me, is a pretty stark parallel,” said Rose Hayden-Smith, a historian and author of “Sowing the Seeds of Victory: American Gardening Programs of World War I.” “Not only was there a war, but there was an influenza pandemic.”

… “So these gardening posters and food preservation posters would appear in literally dozens of languages,” said Hayden-Smith....“We don't have poster art, but we have Instagram,” she said.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/home/a-century-later-victory-gardens-connect-americans-again/2020/04/21/18c69bce-83e2-11ea-81a3-9690c9881111_story.html

Empty Grocery Shelves and Rotting, Wasted Vegetables: Two Sides of a Supply Chain Problem

(Inside Climate News) Georgina Gustin, April 19

"In terms of resilience and nimbleness, they seem to be able to pivot and figure out new supply chains quickly," said Gail Feenstra, deputy director of the University of California-Davis Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education Program (SAREP). "They're always struggling because of the competition that comes from the global food system. It puts many of them at a disadvantage. But now that system is in complete disarray. It allows these regional food systems to emerge. They're the ones that are bringing relief to communities."

… "This is more than a dress rehearsal. This is it," said Feenstra, of UC-Davis, referring to the disruptions caused by the pandemic. "This is going to be here for a while and it isn't the last time this will happen. This is an opportunity for our policy makers to invest in small and mid-scale businesses."

https://insideclimatenews.org/news/17042020/coronavirus-agriculture-supply-chain-grocery-store-farming

Is your tree on death's door? Here's how to tell

(LA Times) Jeanette Marantos, April 19

Climate change, invasive species and even international trade are taking a serious toll on California trees. An estimated 150 million trees died during the drought that started in December 2011, according to Smithsonian Magazine, and the stressed trees that survived became more vulnerable to attack by a host of newcomer pests, said Philippe Rolshausen, subtropical tree specialist for the Cooperative Extension office at UC Riverside.

"There are lots of invasive pests everywhere because of global warming and the movement of plant materials in general," he said. 

https://www.pottsmerc.com/lifestyle/is-your-tree-on-deaths-door-heres-how-to-tell/article_cf72a557-5531-51f6-9fe2-b445055ebb1d.html

Fresh Produce and Milk Go to Waste Even as People Need Food Amid Coronavirus Pandemic

(KQED Forum) Michael Krasny, April 16

Even as food banks are seeing more demand than ever, some California farmers are dumping milk and letting produce rot. The coronavirus pandemic has disrupted how we eat and in turn, how food is distributed. The closure of many restaurants, venues, and schools is leaving many food suppliers with excess perishables. Meanwhile, retailers and food banks are scrambling to keep food in stock. We talk with experts about how California's food supply chain has been disrupted, how it's adapting, and what to expect in the months to come.

Guests: Dan Sumner, professor of agricultural and resource economics, UC Davis

https://www.kqed.org/forum/2010101877032/fresh-produce-and-milk-goes-to-waste-even-as-people-need-food-amid-coronavirus-pandemic

Posted on Friday, May 1, 2020 at 4:25 PM

ANR in the news April 1-15, 2020

Missy Gable talked with Fast Company about how to grow a vegetable garden.

Pandemic And Wildfire: California Is Preparing For A Crisis Within A Crisis

(CapRadio) Ezra David Romero, April 15

…To protect human health, prescribed burns are not allowed for the time being on Forest Service land. But Ryan Tompkins, a forest advisor with the UC Cooperative Extension for Plumas, Sierra, and Lassen counties, says it's still early enough to prepare for wildfire with other tools like thinning and in some cases burning. 

“It is really difficult because of the concerns about smoke and COVID, but sort of now is our chance to be prepared,” said Tompkins. 

…“We know the agencies are going to have maybe limited capacity, limited resources, they're going to have other strains on their organizations while dealing with this crisis,” Tompkins said. “So, I think it emphasizes in a silver lining way that we all have a piece to play or a role to play.” 

Susie Kocher, a forest adviser for the Lake Tahoe region with the UC Cooperative Extension, is concerned about a triple threat of COVID-19, wildfires, and power shutoffs. 

“These two potential situations just could stack on top of the uncertainty of what people need to do,” she said.

https://www.capradio.org/articles/2020/04/15/pandemic-and-wildfire-california-is-preparing-for-a-crisis-within-a-crisis/

Pandemic Crisis Got You Planting a Garden? Join the Club. (18:23)

(BYU Radio) April 14

Guest: Rose Hayden-Smith, PhD, Kellogg Food and Society Policy Fellow, Emeritus Professor of Agriculture and Natural Resources for the University of California, Author of "Sowing the Seeds of Victory: American Gardening Programs of WWI"

The pandemic has sparked a moment of “crisis gardening” among Americans. It's not much different from the Victory Gardens that sprung up in yards around the country during World War I, and then again in World War II.

http://www.byuradio.org/episode/7b035e43-0dd7-4b33-8b59-017e7ab7463d/top-of-mind-with-julie-rose-pandemic-business-stimulus-victory-gardens-pandemic-voices-part-ii?playhead=1103&autoplay=true

New fungicide approved for Calif. tree nuts

(Farm Press) Tim Hearden, April 14

… University of California, Riverside plant pathologist Jim Adaskaveg helped develop data to validate the efficacy of ManKocide for California tree nuts and says the product has advantages, including ease of use.

It is also highly effective against copper-resistant bacteria in California, Adaskaveg said in an email.

“The product has efficacy against the walnut blight and bacterial spot of almond pathogens and suppresses fire blight on pome fruit and bacterial blast on almond,” he said.

Adaskaveg said he is unaware of other products that have this combination as a premixture,

https://www.farmprogress.com/tree-nuts/new-fungicide-approved-calif-tree-nuts

People are rushing to plant 'pandemic gardens' and seed companies say they can't keep up with the surge in demand

(Business Insider) Michelle Mark, April 14, 2020

…It's not the first time economic crises have led Americans to grow their own food. One food historian told HuffPost that the trend began during WWI and WWII.

"Crisis-gardening is not new," Rose Hayden-Smith, the author of "Sowing the Seeds of Victory," told the outlet.

https://www.insider.com/seed-companies-cant-keep-up-with-demand-for-pandemic-gardens-2020-4

4-H searches for locals to serve on sponsoring committee

(San Benito Link) Devii Rao, April 14

We are looking for a few local people to serve on a sponsoring committee to keep 4-H active and strong in San Benito County. The sponsoring committee will organize events such as letter writing campaigns, barn dances, dinners, silent and live auctions, fireworks booths, having 4-H youth sell treats at the fair, or your other creative ideas! Sponsoring committee members are not required to have any affiliation with 4-H. We are looking for business leaders and other people who are well connected in the community and who are motivated to provide educational and leadership opportunities to our youth.

https://benitolink.com/4-h-searches-for-locals-to-serve-on-sponsoring-committee/

California dairies dump milk, crops may be left to wither as coronavirus pandemic disrupts food system

(SF Chronicle) Kurtis Alexander, April 12

…“Everybody's scrambling. The whole food system is scrambling,” said Daniel Sumner, an agricultural economist at UC Davis. “I don't see a big supply-side issue for agriculture. It's really an issue with the food (delivery) system.”

https://www.sfchronicle.com/news/article/California-dairies-dump-milk-crops-may-be-left-15195891.php

Widespread shutdown order slams California dairy farmers, ‘You can't turn off the cows'

(Sacramento Bee) Michael Finch II, April 10

…“Like every part of the food system, there are complications. The issue for milk is you can't turn off the cows,” said Daniel A. Sumner, an agricultural economist and professor at UC Davis. “What's becoming more of a problem is the slightly longer-term outlook where we have a massive recession (coming).”

Dairy prices are regulated by the federal government and fluctuate on the Chicago Mercantile Exchange. So the price of large quantities of milk, cheese, whey and milk powder is set based on data from the prior month, Sumner said.

In January, milk traded at nearly 18 cents per pound and by March the amount fell nearly five cents. Sumner said this suggests there is a price shock to come in the summer.

https://www.sacbee.com/news/california/article241896861.html

Grocers Serving Low-Income Neighborhoods Pinched by Shortages, Rising Prices

(KQED) Farida Jhabvala Romero, April 10

…“This hoarding behavior is unfortunate,” said Richard Sexton, a professor of agriculture and resource economics at UC Davis. “We can understand why people do it, but it is what's causing these disruptions.”

… The current shortages could deepen disadvantages for family-owned neighborhood stores, said Sexton, the UC Davis economist.

“The little guys, the small chains of just a few stores, could get the short end of the stick in this situation because food manufacturers and distributors are going to probably prioritize their biggest and best customers,” he said.

https://www.kqed.org/news/11811758/grocers-serving-low-income-neighborhoods-pinched-by-shortages-rising-prices

 

Private Grant Will Support New UC California Organic Institute

(Organic Farmer) Marni Katz, April 10

A $1 million endowment will establish the University of California's first institute for organic research and education within the UC's Agriculture and Natural Resources division (UC ANR), expanding the UC Cooperative Extension's research and outreach capacity to target organic growers in California.

http://organicfarmermag.com/2020/04/private-grant-will-support-new-uc-california-organic-institute/

UCANR points to help for Californians amid crisis

(Farm Press) Mark Bell, April 10

…In response to these pressing needs, UC Agriculture and Natural Resources, like many other universities and extension organizations across the country, are moving quickly to get more information online. While I haven't seen the actual numbers, we know millions of students (both high school and university) are quickly transitioning to online classes.

https://www.farmprogress.com/extension/ucanr-points-help-californians-amid-crisis

Scientists Worry Agency Plan to Prevent Fires Could Do Opposite

(Bloomberg) Bobby Magill, April 9

…Controlling wildfire in the region depends on how many firefighters the federal government has on the ground—and they'd have to be in the right place at the right time for the fuels reduction plan to work, said Max Moritz, a wildfire specialist at the University of California, Santa Barbara studying how wildfire affects broad landscapes.

As the climate changes, the effectiveness of fuels reductions projects and fuel breaks begins to fade, he said.

“Climate change seems to be priming the landscape for fires to ignite more easily, spread more easily, to burn hotter and larger—so all of these aspects of climate change would make one suspect that fuel breaks have a harder and harder time doing their job,” Moritz said.

The wildfire program is an “expensive large-scale experiment,” he said.

https://news.bloombergenvironment.com/environment-and-energy/scientists-worry-agency-plan-to-prevent-fires-could-do-opposite


The real reason we're seeing more wildlife during the pandemic

(Pop Sci) Ula Chrobak, April 9

…In those cases, additional sightings might be due to simple behavior changes. But a less charismatic creature may be also on the rise due to an increased human presence at home. Niamh Quinn, a human-wildlife interactions advisor with the University of California, thinks that rat populations may be increasing in New Orleans and elsewhere. That's because people are cooking, storing, and disposing of at home, drawing rats away from closed restaurants and toward residences.

…Quinn agrees. Late last year, she radio-collared five coyotes in Los Angeles for a research project. She says that her coyotes haven't changed their routines since the shelter-in-place order went into effect, staying in their respective territories, which include areas near a shopping mall and golf course. Quinn adds that while the number of coyotes reported in San Francisco on the Coyote Cacher website isn't unusual, they could be moving about during the day more. “People are just at home noticing more things,” she says. “Especially in California, we're not all spending five hours a day on the freeway [now], you know?”

https://www.popsci.com/story/environment/wildlife-in-cities-covid-shutdown

HLB spreads slowly, confined to residential citrus

(Capital Press) Padma Naggapan, April 9

…”It's slower than we expected, compared to Texas and Florida,” said Elizabeth Grafton-Cardwell. “In the Central Valley, homeowners and growers have been able to eradicate the pest, although it's been much more challenging in Southern California. But growers are doing an outstanding job of controlling the psyllids.”

https://www.capitalpress.com/specialsections/orchard/hlb-spreads-slowly-confined-to-residential-citrus/article_6b0c836a-697c-11ea-93f9-7b866d5a123c.html

Almond Update: Maximizing Yields and Sustainability from Start to Finish

(AgNet West) Taylor Hillman, April 9, 2020

Setting an orchard up for maximum yield and sustainability is a long game for producers. There are lots of variables, and some are unpredictable such as mother nature. But UC Cooperative Extension Tree Crop Advisor Franz Niederholzer said growers can do several things in the life of an orchard to stay in the game. He believes the most sustainable plan in every aspect of growing is to not focus on hitting home runs but instead have constant attention on management to help them avoid making outs. 

http://agnetwest.com/almond-update-maximizing-yields-and-sustainability-from-start-to-finish/

Soil health practices show benefits

(Morning Ag Clips) Jeannette Warnert, April 9, 2020

A group of California organic farmers is sharing information about their efforts to combine reduced tillage with the use of cover crops, which they have been planting on their vegetable farms for decades to protect soil while adding carbon and diversity to their production systems.

“Every one of the pioneering farmers has seen tremendous benefits from the practices,” said Jeff Mitchell, UC Cooperative Extension vegetable crops specialist. “These are the very growing practices that we have demonstrated over two decades of research to benefit soil health, environmental conservation and the bottom line on plots near Five Points in Fresno County.”

https://www.morningagclips.com/soil-health-practices-show-benefits/

Why are eggs getting so expensive? Blame coronavirus demand

(LA Times) Samantha Masunaga, April 8

…“Eggs are naturally, very often, one of the most price variable products in the supermarket,” said Daniel Sumner, UC Davis professor of agricultural economics and director of the UC Agricultural Issues Center.

…Egg prices could remain elevated for at least a few months, Sumner said. And the demand for eggs has been historically strong during tougher economic stretches. Eggs are a relatively cheap source of protein and aren't seen as a luxury food item.

“It may take longer to get back to normal for the egg business,” he said. “We can build supply, but it takes a few months.”

https://www.latimes.com/business/story/2020-04-08/egg-prices-rising-coronavirus

Rock Front Ranch permanently conserved for wildlife, grazing by Rangeland Trust

(Santa Maria Times) April 7

“To have this ranch be up against and abut to tens of thousands of acres of public lands is an indispensable connection to have in perpetuity,” said Matthew Shapero, livestock and range adviser in Santa Barbara and Ventura Counties for the University of California Cooperative Extension.

https://lompocrecord.com/news/local/rock-front-ranch-permanently-conserved-for-wildlife-grazing-by-rangeland-trust/article_b00c5c41-1779-56d6-9570-f39bbc75aeba.html

Nutrition experts fear 'dirty dozen' produce list will put off consumers

(UPI) Jessie Higgins, April 7

…"Our typical exposure to pesticides is far lower than levels of health concern," Carl Winter, an emeritus cooperative extension specialist in food and science technology at the University of California-Davis, said in an email.

"A graduate student and I published a paper in 2011 relating dietary exposure to toxicity for the 10 most frequently detected pesticides found on the EWG's 2010 Dirty Dozen list," he said. "Estimated exposures were far below levels of toxicological concern. Recommending consumers reduce their consumption of conventional fruits and vegetables on the Dirty Dozen list is unwarranted."

https://www.upi.com/Top_News/US/2020/04/08/Nutrition-experts-fear-dirty-dozen-produce-list-will-put-off-consumers/9201586279176/?sl=1&ur3=1

How to grow a vegetable garden, according to legendary chef Alice Waters

(Fast Company) Aimee Rawlins, April 7

… It's natural to want to go big and plant everything. But it's important to be realistic and start small, and not just because the productivity trap can be debilitating at a time like this.

“Right now we have enough on our plate. Start modestly and in a way that you can manage it,” says Missy Gable, director of the University of California's Master Gardener Program. “If you've never done this before, don't transform a quarter acre.”

… Because soil quality and composition varies depending on region and location, Gable recommends looking up your local master gardener extension program. These programs, which exist in all 50 states, offer classes and resources for home gardeners as well as knowledgable volunteers who are plugged in to local climate and soil particulars. Right now, some master gardener programs, like the one at Oregon State University, are also offering virtual classes. (OSU waived its fee for April and already has more than 17,000 participants.)

https://www.fastcompany.com/90487006/how-to-grow-a-vegetable-garden-according-to-legendary-chef-alice-waters

Pistachio Rootstock Options Today: Seedlings and Clones

(Pacific Nut Producer) Matthew Malcolm, April 6

Pistachio growers have more options today when it comes to varieties and rootstocks to plant with. Watch this brief interview with UCCE Farm Advisor Elizabeth Fichtner as she shares some of the characteristics of rootstocks currently available to growers and some of the pros and cons to planting on a seedling vs. clone. Read more in Pacific Nut Producer Magazine.

https://pacificnutproducer.com/2020/04/06/pistachio-rootstock-options-today-seedlings-and-clones/

UC urges cattle producers to take precautions

(Farm Press) Larry Forero, Sheila Barry, Josh Davy, Gabrielle Maier, April 6

The COVID-19 pandemic has much of the California population staying home in an effort to reduce the spread of the virus. Across the state, many grocery stores have had shelves emptied of food and other day-to-day necessities as people have stockpiled these essentials.

https://www.farmprogress.com/livestock/uc-urges-cattle-producers-take-precautions

http://agnetwest.com/spring-cattle-work-calls-for-covid-19-precautions/

Coronavirus hit California's cut-flower industry at the worst time

((LA Times) Geoffrey Mohan, April 4

…Cut flowers are a $1.3-billion industry nationwide, though most of that revenue comes from the sale of imported flowers, predominantly from Colombia, according to the UC Davis Agricultural Issues Center. Domestic growers account for about 27% of national sales, down from 37% roughly a decade ago. California-grown flowers account for three-quarters of the national domestic sales, according to the UC Davis researchers.

https://www.latimes.com/business/story/2020-04-04/coronavirus-californias-cut-flower-industry

How The Coronavirus Pandemic Has Led To A Boom In Crisis Gardening

(Huff Post) Jodi Helmer, April 3

… Even though food supplies may be currently secure, said Rose Hayden-Smith, a food historian and author of “Sowing the Seeds of Victory,” understocked supermarket shelves are forcing shoppers to think about the source of their food, especially fruits and vegetables, often for the first time. And their fears have led them straight to the garden center.

“It's helpful to be productive and connect with nature and it's something that's within our control in a situation that feels entirely out of control,” she said.

https://www.huffpost.com/entry/seeds-crisis-gardening-coronavirus-food_n_5e85eca0c5b6f55ebf492212

Gardening during a pandemic

(Appeal Democrat) Chris Kaufman, April 3

Since the toilet paper panic-buying subsided, another item quietly flew off the shelves: garden seeds.

Springtime weather combined with shelter-in-place orders and empty shelves at stores has spurred a spike in seed sales, according to some gardening experts.

“I've seen an increase in seed sales because I've been looking around to see what people are doing and anticipating what kind of questions we will get once we open up again,” said Jan Kendel, a master gardener with the Sutter-Yuba University of California Cooperative Extension. “We've had some calls and emails from people wanting to know if it's a good time to plant tomatoes.”

https://www.appeal-democrat.com/news/urgent/gardening-during-a-pandemic/article_067cd2c8-761b-11ea-9d31-ff64ce956ac0.html

Spotted Lanternfly is an Invasive Pest

(AgInfo) Tim Hammerich, April 2

The spotted lanternfly is a colorful insect pest that has been infesting vineyards and orchards in the eastern U.S. So far, we have been effective in our efforts to keep the pest away from California's multi-billion-dollar ag industry. But we must remain diligent in these efforts, says Dr. Surendra Dara, Entomology and Biologicals Advisor in San Luis Obispo and Santa Barbara Counties.

“Spotted lanternfly is an invasive pest because of the reason we don't have any natural enemies that can suppress their populations in a natural way in a new environment," said Dara. "And it can actually infest grapes and several other hosts in California of commercial importance. So it is important for us to be aware of the potential impact and do the need to prevent the damage."

https://californiaagtoday.com/keeping-spotted-lanterfly-state/

The Moment for Food Sovereignty is Now

(Civil Eats) Katie Brimm, April 2

… “People are thinking, ‘If I can't get toilet paper, am I going to be able to get food?'” said Rose Hayden-Smith, a longtime community gardener and a Victory Garden historian, who recently retired from the University of California.

… Hayden-Smith notes that, despite the fact that the coronavirus pandemic came on much more suddenly than either World War, individuals and communities are once again turning to gardening to create food security.

https://civileats.com/2020/04/02/the-moment-for-food-sovereignty-is-now/

California's truffle industry could be poised for growth if top hunter helps find path

(Sac Bee) Becky Grunewald, April 1

… Her dining companion is a tall scientist with a gentle demeanor, Scott Oneto. Although he didn't command the attention of this room, his work could be key to whether truffle cultivation becomes big business in local farming, or just a flash in the (frying) pan.

Oneto, a sixth generation California farmer with a background in weed science, had to be coaxed into the project, according to O'Toole. Oneto said after a few years of requests, it took a much-needed sabbatical, at which he could “really dive into research” to catch him at the perfect point to start their (hopefully) fruitful collaboration.

An Aggie through-and-through, Oneto got both his bachelor's and master's degrees at UC Davis, and works for Agriculture and Natural Resources. ANR is an unsung arm of the University of California, with the mission to bring the latest in agricultural science to the California community. Oneto not only bridges the gap to farmers by translating academic science research into in-person workshops and handouts, he also tailors research to local needs.

“When I have a farmer or rancher who is presented with problems, whether it be a new pest, weed, pathogen, or the effects of climate change, we help them solve those problems so they can continue to be successful in agriculture,” Oneto said.

https://www.sacbee.com/news/business/article241680801.html

Humboldt Using Satellite Tech Against Illicit Cannabis

(TechWire) Carl Smith, April 1

…“Local zoning, permitting and enforcement is probably more important than state-level initiatives, although collaboration across units of government is also key,” said Van Butsic, co-director of the Cannabis Research Center at the University of California, Berkeley.

In fact, every available strategy is needed as California works to implement the “robust standards” that it envisions for cannabis cultivation. For one thing, growers who are willing to play by the rules still face competition from illicit operations. In 2019, sales of illegal cannabis products in California were expected to hit $8.7 billion, more than twice the total for legal sales.

“Larger producers have been able to navigate the system,” said Butsic. “Many smaller growers are going out of business or staying illegal.” Costs are also part of the equation. “The illegal market is competitive because legal marijuana is so expensive to produce under Prop. 64,” Dale Gieringer, director of Cal NORML, told The Los Angeles Times.

https://www.techwire.net/news/humboldt-using-satellite-tech-against-illicit-cannabis.html

GMOs Are an Ally in a Changing Climate

(Wired) Emma Marris, April 1, 2020

In Davis, California, 190 miles from Terranova, I met up with Pamela Ronald, a plant geneticist at UC Davis who has worked to solve this problem. Climate change is making floods worse in parts of South Asia, and in 2006, Ronald helped create a kind of rice that can survive submersion in water. By 2017, some 6 million farmers in Bangladesh, Nepal, and India were growing this rice. We talked in her cozy office, where a painting hangs on the wall of a man under a deluge of rain struggling to plow a field.

https://www.wired.com/story/future-food-will-need-gmo-organic-hybrid/

College farms still functioning amid shutdowns

(Farm Press) Tim Hearden, April 1, 2020

…Most employees for the UC's Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources are working remotely during their normal business hours and visiting sites in person for essential duties such as feeding animals, officials said. All the UC Cooperative Extension's in-person seminars and workshops scheduled for April were cancelled.

At the research centers, UC leaders are considering which projects should continue and which ones could be postponed, said Mark Lagrimini, UCANR's vice provost of research and extension.

“With the research that can go forward, we're making sure that protection is provided for the workers and students,”Lagrimini said. “We do have staff out there working right now. We have over 500 projects going on. We're in the process of going through 500 projects and making sure they are all able to be conducted safely. It's a big job.

https://www.farmprogress.com/farm-operations/college-farms-still-functioning-amid-shutdowns

Posted on Thursday, April 30, 2020 at 3:48 PM

Are coyotes becoming bolder in California while humans shelter in place?

Coyote sightings are on the rise in San Francisco, even taking naps in patches of green spaces in the city, reported Uma Chrobak in Popular Science. However, it is unlikely they indicate a change in wildlife behavior, said UC Cooperative Extension human-wildlife interactions advisor Niamh Quinn.

Officials believe the increased sightings may have more to do with a change in human behavior. Many people are at home and bored, so they may staring out the window and going on more walks in their neighborhoods.

Urban coyote sightings can be recorded at https://ucanr.edu/sites/CoyoteCacher/ (Photo: National Park Service)

Quinn follows five radio-collared coyotes in Los Angeles for a research project. She says her coyotes haven't changed their routines since the shelter-in-place order went into effect, staying in their respective territories, which include areas near a shopping mall and golf course.

The number of coyotes reported in San Francisco on Quinn's Coyote Cacher website isn't unusual, she said.

“People are just at home noticing more things,” she said, "especially in California, we're not all spending five hours a day on the freeway [now], you know?”

If you see coyotes or other wildlife, give them space, Quinn said. “It's very important to keep wildlife wild,” she said. “You should never feed wildlife.”

Coyote sightings can be recorded on the Coyote Cacher website, and the public can view a map of coyotes sightings by ZIP Code on the site.

Posted on Thursday, April 9, 2020 at 10:35 AM
Tags: coyotes (12), Niamh Quinn (15), wildlife (33)
Focus Area Tags: Environment

UCCE researcher studies urban coyotes

Some people believe shouting, waving arms and flashing lights will keep coyotes at bay, but UC Cooperative Extenison wildlife-human interaction advisor Niamh Quinn isn't so sure, reported Louis Sahagun in the Los Angeles Times. Like any scientist, she is now conducting a research project to understand whether such hazing deters the wild animals from making their homes in urban areas.

"There is no scientific evidence that hazing alters the behavior of urban coyotes," Quinn said."Yet, it is being pitched as a good option for coyote management."

Quinn is trapping coyotes, sedating them, attaching radio collars, tagging their ears and tracking their movements to understand whether the techniques recommended by some cities and animal rights groups are effective.

“We want to figure out when, where and for how long it actually works, or if it even works at all,” she said. “For the sake of our communities, and coyotes, too.”

UC Cooperative Extension human-wildlife interaction advisor Niamh Quinn is conducting research to help Southern California communities manage the growing coyote population.
Posted on Monday, December 2, 2019 at 4:28 PM
Tags: coyotes (12), Niamh Quinn (15)
Focus Area Tags: Environment

August 2018 News Clips 8/16-8/31

Enormous wildfires spark scramble to improve fire models

(Nature) Jeff Tollefson, Aug. 31

…“Something is definitely different, and it raises questions about how much we really know,” says Max Moritz, a fire scientist at the University of California, Santa Barbara.

… The problem, Moritz says, is that most of the fire models in use today are based on data from the past two or three decades. But it seems that fire behaviour might be shifting in response to climate faster than anybody expected, and that makes it increasingly problematic to extrapolate from past trends, he adds.

https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-018-06090-0

Rodent control critical in subsurface alfalfa systems

(Farm Press) Todd Fitchette, Aug 31,

For alfalfa growers seeking other methods of rodent control, Dr. Roger Baldwin, Cooperative Extension specialist at UC Davis, says rodenticides, fumigants and trapping can be moderately to highly effective, depending on method and means used.

https://www.westernfarmpress.com/alfalfa/rodent-control-critical-subsurface-alfalfa-systems

Deeply Talks: Fire & Drought–The Extremes Become Routine

(Water Deeply) Matt Weiser, Aug. 30,

The American West has entered an era of permanent water scarcity, a marked shift from previous periods of episodic drought. The same can now be said for fire: In California, there hasn't been a month without a wildfire since 2012. Join us for a conversation about the ways in which water and wildfire management intersect, and about the West's adaptation to its new, and far from normal, reality. We'll be joined by experts Crystal Kolden, associate professor of forest, range, and fire sciences in the College of Natural Resources at the University of Idaho, and Van Butsic, cooperative extension specialist at the University of California, Berkeley. Email our community editor with questions for the panelists (lindsay@newsdeeply.com) or tweet us @waterdeeply using the hashtag #DeeplyTalks.

https://www.newsdeeply.com/water/talks/153877805

Deadly poultry ailment, Newcastle disease, reaches Ventura County

(Ventura County Star), Aug. 29

Maurice Pitesky, a veterinarian and University of California extension specialist in the School of Veterinary Medicine at UC Davis, said one of the challenges in keeping a lid on the disease is the continued popularity of raising backyard chickens. 

“While people have the best intentions, unfortunately a lack of biosecurity practices in people's backyards is one of the contributing factors of the disease spreading,” Pitesky said.

https://www.vcstar.com/story/news/2018/08/29/deadly-poultry-ailment-newcastle-disease-reaches-ventura-county/1140544002/

The longtime head of the UFW is stepping down. His replacement will be the first woman to lead the union

(LA Times) Geoffrey Mohan, Aug. 28

At its heart, the UFW remains torn between whether it can be both a grass-roots union and a broad social movement operating in the halls of power, said Philip Martin, a UC Davis agricultural economist and farm labor expert.

...“It is worth noting that the UFW does not have union locals, and so therefore does not have a system under which current farmworkers are trained in leadership development with the idea that they will rise within the union,” he said.

http://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-ufw-president-20180828-story.html

Expert Views: Managing Wildfires to Protect Water Resources

(Water Deeply) Lindsay Abrams, Aug. 28

Van Butsic, cooperative extension specialist at the University of California, Berkeley:

"Managing forest and wildfires to benefit water resources is difficult because there are trade-offs between short-term costs and long-term benefits. In the short term, wildfires can lead to increased erosion and sedimentation in streams and reservoirs. This contributes to lost revenue for downstream power generators and at times even requires water to be treated before it is potable."

https://www.newsdeeply.com/water/community/2018/08/28/expert-views-managing-wildfires-to-protect-water-resources

Can Angelenos and Coyotes Coexist?

(LA Magazine) Henry Cherry, Aug. 27

…Intrigued by the animals, I stumbled across Coyote Cacher, an interactive website operated by University of California's Dr. Niamh Quinn. A native of Ireland, Quinn has been studying coyotes for about four years. “There are no coyotes in Ireland, but when I came here there was the need for coyote research in Southern California,” Quinn says. “There is a need for professional extension to the cities and the police departments, the people that never managed coyotes before but all of a sudden find themselves needing to do so.”

http://www.lamag.com/citythinkblog/coyotes-los-angeles/

Why homes are lost to wildfire — is yours as safe as it could be?

(Mercury News) Lisa Krieger, Aug. 27

…“When you start to understand why homes burn, often through embers igniting fuel in home attics or adjacent to homes, then it is easier to understand these patterns,” said Kate Wilkin, a fire specialist for UC Cooperative Extension.

https://www.mercurynews.com/2018/08/26/why-homes-are-lost-to-wildfire-is-yours-as-safe-as-it-could-be

Limiting suburban sprawl can ease the devastation of wildfires

(Mother Nature Network) Matt Hickman, Aug. 27

…But there's a bigger issue at hand. Max Moritz, a wildfire specialist with the University of California's Division of Agriculture & Natural Resources, relays to Martin Kuz of the Christian Science Monitor that inaction from state lawmakers who are reluctant to lead the charge in restricting development in vulnerable areas is only worsening the situation. Presently, local officials, developers and homeowners face few limitations when building in fire-prone wild land urban interfaces. Moritz refers to this as a “political will problem.”

https://www.mnn.com/earth-matters/climate-weather/blogs/limiting-suburban-sprawl-ease-devastation-wildfires

What are GMOs?

(KYMA 13 On Your Side) Caitlin Slater, Aug. 27

Take a look in your refrigerator or pantry and you most likely find something with a NON GMO label on it.

13 On Your Side reporter, Caitlin Slater received an award at the annual Yuma County Farm Bureau meeting. The keynote speaker at the event was genomics and biotechnology researcher at UC Davis, Dr. Allison Van Eenennaam. She presented on how GMOs are actually better for us and our environment. 

https://www.kyma.com/news/what-are-gmos-/786983339

Irrigation Tips to Mitigate Almond Hull Rot & Bark Damage

(Pacific Nut Producer) Aug. 27

The posting of this video is a little belated as almond harvest has already begun, but if you've had hull rot issues this season, be sure to watch this brief video interview with Nut Crops Advisor Mae Culumber as she provides some tips to prevent hull rot and trunk damage through better irrigation practices, as explained at a mid-July Nut & Vine Irrigation seminar at the UC Cooperative Extension office in Fresno.  Read more about it in Pacific Nut Producer Magazine.  Culumber will also be addressing almond growers at the Annual Grape, Nut & Tree Fruit Expo coming up on November 13th at the Big Fresno Fairgrounds, so be sure to attend!

http://www.pacificnutproducer.com/2018/08/irrigation-tips-to-mitigate-almond-hull-rot-bark-damage

Three Tips on Managing Pocket Gophers

(American Vineyard) Aug. 24

Pocket gophers can be very detrimental for growers, especially those with young orchards.  So how do you minimize populations of these pesky critters?  Watch this brief interview with Julie Finzel from the UC Cooperative Extension as she offers growers three quick tips for effective management. Julie will also be addressing growers on wildlife issues at the upcoming Grape, Nut & Tree Fruit Expo at the BIG Fresno Fairgrounds on November 13th, so be sure to attend.  Learn more about it on AgExpo.biz.

http://www.americanvineyardmagazine.com/2018/08/24/three-tips-on-managing-pocket-gophers/

Master Gardeners: gardening in an age of climate change

(Napa Valley Register) Aug 24

This article is a summary of a seminar conducted by Susanne von Rosenberg, UC Master Gardener of Napa County, on gardening in an age of climate change.

https://napavalleyregister.com/lifestyles/home-and-garden/columnists/master-gardener/master-gardeners-gardening-in-an-age-of-climate-change/article_0095ca98-e5f2-5604-8fc7-ace5fdfe3f69.html

Idea to Reduce Glyphosate Use with Grapes

(Cal Ag Today) Mikenzi Meyers, Aug. 23

John Roncoroni, a UC Cooperative Extension Weed Science Farm Advisor in Napa County, has made strides toward meeting this challenge. “Many times, growers will do two applications of herbicides during the year … but what I'm trying to do is push it back to post-leaf fall after the season to clean up and come back with a pre-emergent material right before bud break then maybe skip that last glyphosate treatment after bud break.”

https://californiaagtoday.com/idea-reduce-glyphosate-use-grapes/

California Today: The Human Element in California's Wildfires

(New York Times) Tim Arango, Inyoung Kang, Aug. 23

William Stewart, an expert on forestry at the University of California at Berkeley, said that part of the California dream was keeping “nature as it is,” with minimal management of forests.

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/08/23/us/california-today-fires-humans.html

Editing the Future of Aquaculture

(Hatchery International) Eric Ignatz, Aug. 23

…Dr. Alison Van Eenennaam, a cooperative extension specialist at the University of California, Davis, and a collaborator on the Recombinetics project, says that gene editing in the case of polled cattle is used to address an animal welfare concern. Typically, horns must be burned off to better protect the safety of farmers and other animals.
http://magazine.hatcheryinternational.com/publication/?i=517633&article_id=3159268#

Industrial hemp could be an alternative crop of the low desert

(Imperial Valley Press) Oli Bachie, Aug. 23

Hemp, Cannabis sativa L., is a dioecious annual plant that has not been grown legally in California for many years, due to regulatory restrictions.

https://www.ivpressonline.com/news/local/industrial-hemp-could-be-an-alternative-crop-of-the-low/article_43b7eaf0-a661-11e8-a0e3-17328854cb36.html

UCSB SmartFarm uses cloud computing to help farmers increase sustainability

(Santa Maria Sun) Kasey Bubnash, Aug. 22

"They're basically taking what Google and the internet are doing with information and applying it to ag," said Beth Grafton-Cardwell, a research entomologist at UC Riverside. "And that hasn't really been done."

http://www.santamariasun.com/school-scene/17745/ucsb-smartfarm-uses-cloud-computing-to-help-farmers-increase-sustainability/

The Social Costs of Living in Wildfire-Prone Areas 

(East Bay Express) Alastair Bland, Aug. 21

…"But that's so politically contentious — it's a line politicians walk up to but turn away from," said William Stewart, a UC Berkeley forestry and wildfire specialist.

… “People seem to have short memories," said Sabrina Drill, a natural resources advisor for the UC Cooperative Extension, a statewide off-campus division of the university system that focuses on agriculture and natural resources. "I think people might think twice about building a home where there had just been a fire, but people seem to forget after about three years."

… Van Butsic, a UC Berkeley researcher who studies forestry and land use, has closely studied this. In a paper now under review for publication, he and scientist Anu Kramer, from the University of Wisconsin, describe an alarming trend of building homes in known fire-risk areas.

"We studied 30 of the largest fires since 1970," he said. On average, they found that 20 years after an inhabited area burns, not only were most of the destroyed homes rebuilt but many new homes were added — about twice as many homes in total as there were at the time of the burn.

… In 2016, researcher Susan Kocher spent nine months on sabbatical in Provence, the arid region of southern France that resembles much of inland California. Here, Kocher — the Central Sierra Natural Resources Advisor for the UC Cooperative Extension — compared building patterns in high-fire risk parts of California and France.

"In California we often say, 'We should be able to tell people they can't build here,'" said Kocher, whose research, coauthored with Butsic, was published in March of 2017 in the journal Land. "In France, they just tell people they can't build somewhere."

https://www.eastbayexpress.com/oakland/the-social-costs-of-living-in-wildfire-prone-areas/Content?oid=19389439

Cooperative Extension adapts to a less agricultural America

(Washington Post) Dean Fosdick, Aug. 21

In its century of existence, the Cooperative Extension System has been a valuable resource distributing university-driven, science-based information — mostly about farming and gardening — to the public. But in today's less agricultural America, the Extension network is adapting, expanding its rural focus into cities and suburbs too.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/food/cooperative-extension-adapts-to-a-less-agricultural-america/2018/08/21/2fb1da66-a553-11e8-ad6f-080770dcddc2_story.html

Karuk Tribe And University Expand Food Partnership

(Jefferson Public Radio) Geoffrey Riley, April Ehrlich & John Baxter, Aug. 20

The Karuk Tribe and the University of California-Berkeley developed a partnership several years ago to rebuild Traditional Ecological Knowledge.

Lisa Hillman from the tribe's Píkyav Field Institute and Jennifer Sowerwine from UC-Berkeley are our guests.  

http://www.ijpr.org/post/karuk-tribe-and-university-expand-food-partnership#stream/0

Finding the Sweet Spot for Carb Consumption

(KQED) Forum, Aug. 20

A Summary of the Study (The Lancet)

Guests:

  • Lorrene Ritchie, director, Nutrition Policy Institute, University of California
  • Rick Hecht, professor of medicine, University of California San Francisco

https://www.kqed.org/forum/2010101866786/finding-the-sweet-spot-for-carb-consumption

Officials give updates, answer questions at Mendocino Complex virtual recovery meeting

(Lake County News) Aug. 17

After weeks of fire update meetings, on Thursday night local, state and federal officials participated in a meeting focused on recovery from the Mendocino Complex.

Speakers included County Administrative Officer Carol Huchingson, Cal Fire Incident Management Team 2 spokesman Jeremy Rahn, Paul Gibbs of federal Incident Management Team 1, Lake County Sheriff Brian Martin, Supervisor Jim Steele, Public Health Director Denise Pomeroy, James Scott of Lake County Environmental Health, Lake County Water Resources Director David Cowan, Rachel Elkins of the University of California Cooperative Extension, Lakeport Mayor Mireya Turner and Lake County Recovery Coordinator Nathan Spangler.

http://www.lakeconews.com/index.php/news/57419-officials-give-updates-answer-questions-at-mendocino-complex-virtual-recovery-meeting

The USDA Is Buying Milk And Giving It To Food Banks

(NPR Marketplace) Mitchell Hartman, Aug. 17

...Agricultural economist Daniel Sumner at the University of California, Davis said the purchase is only a drop in the bucket. 

"How much can you move the needle on price buying one-tenth-of-one percent of milk?" Sumner said. "Not very much." 

https://www.marketplace.org/2018/08/17/economy/milk-usda-50-million-food-bank

Israel and UC deepen water technology collaboration

(Jewish News of Northern California) Hannah Jannol, Aug 17

S.F.-based Consul General of Israel Shlomi Kofman attended the MOU signing ceremony on July 16, held during a three-day workshop titled, “The Future of Water for Irrigation in California and Israel.” The document was signed by an agricultural division of the University of California, UC Davis and the Agricultural Research Organization of Israel.

… Doug Parker, director of the California Institute for Water Resources, helped put the MOU together. He said California and Israel already work together frequently on water research, but formalizing the relationship could give the two parties more leverage when applying for grants and funding.

https://www.jweekly.com/2018/08/17/israel-and-uc-deepen-water-technology-collaboration/

‘Batnadoes' Can Protect California's Crops

(Atlas Obscura) Anne Ewbank, Aug. 16

… He's likely right, according to Rachael Long, a farm advisor with the UC Cooperative Extension in the Sacramento Valley. She's researched for decades how bats can help farmers control pests. “Armyworms are always a big problem in rice production,” she says. “Bats are predators, of armyworms, cutworms, and other pests.” Bats' nocturnal feasts prevent adult moths from laying eggs that will hatch into hungry, rice-eating caterpillars, and, Long says, their impact cannot be overstated. When pest populations get out of control, “it can be really devastating.”

https://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/bats-and-farming

Wildfires Are Inevitable – Increasing Home Losses, Fatalities and Costs Are Not

(KQED) The Conversation, Max MoritzNaomi Tague and Sarah Anderson, Aug. 16

Wildfire has been an integral part of California ecosystems for centuries. Now, however, nearly a third of homes in the state are in wildland urban interface areas where houses intermingling with wildlands and fire is a natural phenomenon. Just as Californians must live with earthquake risk, they must live with wildfires.

https://www.kqed.org/news/11687042/wildfires-are-inevitable-increasing-home-losses-fatalities-and-costs-are-not

 

Posted on Friday, August 31, 2018 at 6:38 PM

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