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Posts Tagged: monarchs

Once Upon a Monarch...

A monarch caterpillar dines on tropical milkweed on Oct. 27, 2017 in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

We first saw her at 10 a.m. on Oct. 27, 2017. She was eating. That's what monarch caterpillars do best. They eat. A lot. "Where have you been?" I...

A monarch caterpillar dines on tropical milkweed on Oct. 27, 2017 in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A monarch caterpillar dines on tropical milkweed on Oct. 27, 2017 in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A monarch caterpillar dines on tropical milkweed on Oct. 27, 2017 in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The monarch caterpillar, found Oct. 27 on milkweed in Vacaville, Calif., formed this chrysalis on Nov. 4. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The monarch caterpillar, found Oct. 27 on milkweed in Vacaville, Calif., formed this chrysalis on Nov. 4. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The monarch caterpillar, found Oct. 27 on milkweed in Vacaville, Calif., formed this chrysalis on Nov. 4. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

On Nov. 22, the chrysalis darkened, revealing the iconic orange, black and white wings of the monarch in all its transparency. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
On Nov. 22, the chrysalis darkened, revealing the iconic orange, black and white wings of the monarch in all its transparency. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

On Nov. 22, the chrysalis darkened, revealing the iconic orange, black and white wings of the monarch in all its transparency. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

On Nov. 22, the monarch eclosed. It's a girl! Here she clings to her pupal case. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
On Nov. 22, the monarch eclosed. It's a girl! Here she clings to her pupal case. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

On Nov. 22, the monarch eclosed. It's a girl! Here she clings to her pupal case. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Monarch Mom Rita LeRoy, farm keeper at Loma Vista Farm, Vallejo, is ready to release the Vacaville-born and reared monarch at the butterfly sanctuary at Natural Bridges State Park, Santa Cruz, on  Nov. 24.
Monarch Mom Rita LeRoy, farm keeper at Loma Vista Farm, Vallejo, is ready to release the Vacaville-born and reared monarch at the butterfly sanctuary at Natural Bridges State Park, Santa Cruz, on Nov. 24.

Monarch Mom Rita LeRoy, farm keeper at Loma Vista Farm, Vallejo, is ready to release the Vacaville-born and reared monarch at the butterfly sanctuary at Natural Bridges State Park, Santa Cruz, on Nov. 24.

Posted on Monday, November 27, 2017 at 3:39 PM

Parasitoid Palooza! Or What Ate My Caterpillar or Chrysalis

This monarch chrysalis is filled with tachinid fly larvae, about to emerge. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

So you're trying to rear monarch butterflies. You notice an egg on your milkweed plant, and watch its life cycle from egg to caterpillar to...

This monarch chrysalis is filled with tachinid fly larvae, about to emerge. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
This monarch chrysalis is filled with tachinid fly larvae, about to emerge. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This monarch chrysalis is filled with tachinid fly larvae, about to emerge. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Tachinid fly larva emerges from a monarch chrysalis. It will turn brown, harden, and become a pupa--and eventually, an adult  tachinid fly. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Tachinid fly larva emerges from a monarch chrysalis. It will turn brown, harden, and become a pupa--and eventually, an adult tachinid fly. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Tachinid fly larva emerges from a monarch chrysalis. It will turn brown, harden, and become a pupa--and eventually, an adult tachinid fly. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, November 13, 2017 at 5:00 PM

How to Attract Pollinators to Your Garden

A monarch sips nectar from a tropical milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It's a great topic. Horticulture experts at the UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden will join forces with the Yolo County Master Gardeners on...

A monarch sips nectar from a tropical milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A monarch sips nectar from a tropical milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A monarch sips nectar from a tropical milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A male territorial long-horned bee targets a red admiral buttefly sipping nectar from a Mexican sunfower, Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A male territorial long-horned bee targets a red admiral buttefly sipping nectar from a Mexican sunfower, Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A male territorial long-horned bee targets a red admiral buttefly sipping nectar from a Mexican sunfower, Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A male long-horned bee buzzes across a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A male long-horned bee buzzes across a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A male long-horned bee buzzes across a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, September 22, 2017 at 4:15 PM

Bohart Museum Associate Jeff Smith: A Monarch Kind of Day

Entomologist Jeff Smith's 70th birthday cake featured a monarch butterfly motif. A 30-year volunteer at the Bohart Museum of Entomology, he curates the butterfly and moth collection.  (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Entomologist Jeff Smith, who curates the butterfly and moth collection at the Bohart Museum of Entomology, University of California, Davis, had a...

Entomologist Jeff Smith's 70th birthday cake featured a monarch butterfly motif. A 30-year volunteer at the Bohart Museum of Entomology, he curates the butterfly and moth collection.  (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Entomologist Jeff Smith's 70th birthday cake featured a monarch butterfly motif. A 30-year volunteer at the Bohart Museum of Entomology, he curates the butterfly and moth collection. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Entomologist Jeff Smith's 70th birthday cake featured a monarch butterfly motif. A 30-year volunteer at the Bohart Museum of Entomology, he curates the butterfly and moth collection. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Smith's favorite butterflies so a monarch motif appeared on his surprise birthday cake. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Smith's favorite butterflies so a monarch motif appeared on his surprise birthday cake. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The monarch is one of Jeff Smith's favorite butterflies so a monarch motif appeared on his surprise birthday cake. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Entomologist Jeff Smith (center) is surrounded by friends and colleagues at his surprise birthday party. They enjoyed carrot cake, ice cream and sparkling apple juice. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Entomologist Jeff Smith (center) is surrounded by friends and colleagues at his surprise birthday party. They enjoyed carrot cake, ice cream and sparkling apple juice. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Entomologist Jeff Smith (center) is surrounded by friends and colleagues at his surprise birthday party. They enjoyed carrot cake, ice cream and sparkling apple juice. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, August 24, 2017 at 5:03 PM

Make Mine the Monarch

A longhorn bee, probably a Melissodes agilis, targets a monarch butterfly, Danaus plexippus, nectaring on a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia) in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The National Geographic just ran a piece titled "Without Bugs, We Might All Be Dead." "There are 1.4 billion insects for each one of us," wrote...

A longhorn bee, probably a Melissodes agilis, targets a monarch butterfly, Danaus plexippus, nectaring on a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia) in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A longhorn bee, probably a Melissodes agilis, targets a monarch butterfly, Danaus plexippus, nectaring on a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia) in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A longhorn bee, probably a Melissodes agilis, targets a monarch butterfly, Danaus plexippus, nectaring on a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia) in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Targeted by male territorial bees, a monarch takes flight. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Targeted by male territorial bees, a monarch takes flight. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Targeted by male territorial bees, a monarch takes flight. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, August 10, 2017 at 6:07 PM

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