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Posts Tagged: blanket flower

Let's Hear It for the Bees and Beekeepers

Two matched pairs of honey bees on a blanket flower, Gaillardia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Let's hear it for the honey bees. Right now they're scrambling to gather nectar and pollen from the blanket flower, Gaillardia. You could say...

Two matched pairs of honey bees on a blanket flower, Gaillardia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Two matched pairs of honey bees on a blanket flower, Gaillardia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Two matched pairs of honey bees on a blanket flower, Gaillardia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, November 14, 2016 at 6:49 PM

Do Honey Bees Have Taste Buds?

Honey bees sipping nectar from a blanketflower (Gaillardia), while another bee buzzes in. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

You've seen honey bees nectaring on flowers. You've watched their proboscis (tongue) probing for nectar. Some linger quite awhile before they buzz...

Honey bees sipping nectar from a blanketflower (Gaillardia), while another bee buzzes in. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Honey bees sipping nectar from a blanketflower (Gaillardia), while another bee buzzes in. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Honey bees sipping nectar from a blanketflower (Gaillardia), while another bee buzzes in. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, September 16, 2016 at 5:59 PM
Tags: blanket flower (10), Eric Mussen (266), Gailllardia (1), honey bees (357), taste buds (1)

Find the Praying Mantis!

Find the praying mantis on the blanket flower (Gaillardia). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It's early evening and the bees are all over the blanket flower (Gaillardia). But wait, if you look closely, you'll see a tiny sticklike figure on...

Find the praying mantis on the blanket flower (Gaillardia). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Find the praying mantis on the blanket flower (Gaillardia). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Find the praying mantis on the blanket flower (Gaillardia). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Praying mantis rotates his head, looking for prey. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Praying mantis rotates his head, looking for prey. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Praying mantis rotates his head, looking for prey. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, July 13, 2016 at 4:29 PM

How to Plan a Menu for a Crab Spider

A crab spider dines on a sweat bee, a female Halictus tripartitus (as identified by native pollinator specialist Robbin Thorp, distinguished emeritus professor of entomology at UC Davis). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Dear Crab Spider, Please don't eat the pollinators. You may help yourself to a mosquito, a crane fly, a lygus bug, an aphid, and a katydid, not...

A crab spider dines on a sweat bee, a female Halictus tripartitus (as identified by native pollinator specialist Robbin Thorp, distinguished emeritus professor of entomology at UC Davis). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A crab spider dines on a sweat bee, a female Halictus tripartitus (as identified by native pollinator specialist Robbin Thorp, distinguished emeritus professor of entomology at UC Davis). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A crab spider dines on a sweat bee, a female Halictus tripartitus (as identified by native pollinator specialist Robbin Thorp, distinguished emeritus professor of entomology at UC Davis). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Missed! A male long-horned bee, probably Melissodes agilis, eludes the crab spider. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Missed! A male long-horned bee, probably Melissodes agilis, eludes the crab spider. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Missed! A male long-horned bee, probably Melissodes agilis, eludes the crab spider. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A crab spider on top of the world, the cone of a petal-less blanket flower (Gaillardia). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A crab spider on top of the world, the cone of a petal-less blanket flower (Gaillardia). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A crab spider on top of the world, the cone of a petal-less blanket flower (Gaillardia). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Hey, I can wait all day. And I will. I'm a Wait Watcher. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Hey, I can wait all day. And I will. I'm a Wait Watcher. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Hey, I can wait all day. And I will. I'm a Wait Watcher. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, July 5, 2016 at 5:32 PM

What's Better than Sighting a Bumble Bee?

A newly emerged yellow-faced bumble bee queen, Bombus vosnesenskii, eyes the photographer as it forages on blanket flower (Gaillardia). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

What's better than sighting a yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii? Well, a newly emerged Bombus vosnesenskii queen. On the last day of...

A newly emerged yellow-faced bumble bee queen, Bombus vosnesenskii, eyes the photographer as it forages on blanket flower (Gaillardia). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A newly emerged yellow-faced bumble bee queen, Bombus vosnesenskii, eyes the photographer as it forages on blanket flower (Gaillardia). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A newly emerged yellow-faced bumble bee queen, Bombus vosnesenskii, eyes the photographer as it forages on blanket flower (Gaillardia). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Yellow-faced bumble bee shows its distinguishing marks. This is a queen Bombus vosnesenskii, about 21mm long. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Yellow-faced bumble bee shows its distinguishing marks. This is a queen Bombus vosnesenskii, about 21mm long. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Yellow-faced bumble bee shows its distinguishing marks. This is a queen Bombus vosnesenskii, about 21mm long. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Up and away! A distinguishing feature of Bombus vosnesenskii is the yellow stripe, T4 segment of its thorax. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Up and away! A distinguishing feature of Bombus vosnesenskii is the yellow stripe, T4 segment of its thorax. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Up and away! A distinguishing feature of Bombus vosnesenskii is the yellow stripe, T4 segment of its thorax. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

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