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International Pollinator Conference Comes to UC Davis

A longhorned bee flies over a Mexican sunflower blossom (Tithonia) in Vacaville. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It's all about the pollinators--whether they be bumble bees, longhorned bees, squash bees, sweat bees, honey bees or hummingbirds. Yes, hummingbirds...

A longhorned bee flies over a Mexican sunflower blossom (Tithonia) in Vacaville. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A longhorned bee flies over a Mexican sunflower blossom (Tithonia) in Vacaville. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A longhorned bee flies over a Mexican sunflower blossom (Tithonia) in Vacaville. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A squash bee, a specialist bee that forages on the genus Cucurbita, buzzes out of squash blossom in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A squash bee, a specialist bee that forages on the genus Cucurbita, buzzes out of squash blossom in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A squash bee, a specialist bee that forages on the genus Cucurbita, buzzes out of squash blossom in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee (Apis mellifera) and a yellow-faced bumble bee (Bombus vosnesenskii) share a flower on the UC Davis campus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A honey bee (Apis mellifera) and a yellow-faced bumble bee (Bombus vosnesenskii) share a flower on the UC Davis campus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee (Apis mellifera) and a yellow-faced bumble bee (Bombus vosnesenskii) share a flower on the UC Davis campus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Male Longhorned Bees: Boys' Night Out!

Male longhorned bees, Melissodes, spending the night on a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia)in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Boys' Night Out! Have you ever seen a cluster of longhorned male bees sleeping overnight on a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia)? Every day around...

Male longhorned bees, Melissodes, spending the night on a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia)in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Male longhorned bees, Melissodes, spending the night on a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia)in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Male longhorned bees, Melissodes, spending the night on a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia)in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Male longhorned bees, probably Melissodes agilis, begin to wake up after spending the night clustered on a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia) in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Male longhorned bees, probably Melissodes agilis, begin to wake up after spending the night clustered on a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia) in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Male longhorned bees, probably Melissodes agilis, begin to wake up after spending the night clustered on a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia) in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

How This Tiny Warrior Crashed the Hammock Lab Water Balloon Battle

Jasmine Morisseau, 10, holds a male praying mantis, a Stagmomantis limbata, the tiniest warrior at the Bruce Hammock Lab Water Balloon Battle. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

He wasn't invited, but he crashed the party anyway. A few minutes before the 16th annual Bruce Hammock Lab Water Balloon Battle began on the Briggs...

Jasmine Morisseau, 10, holds a male praying mantis, a Stagmomantis limbata, the tiniest warrior at the Bruce Hammock Lab Water Balloon Battle. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Jasmine Morisseau, 10, holds a male praying mantis, a Stagmomantis limbata, the tiniest warrior at the Bruce Hammock Lab Water Balloon Battle. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Jasmine Morisseau, 10, holds a male praying mantis, a Stagmomantis limbata, the tiniest warrior at the Bruce Hammock Lab Water Balloon Battle. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Filling water balloons for the Bruce Hammock Lab Water Balloon Battle are (from left) Yuan Ding, visiting graduate student; Dongyang Li, assistant project scientist; and Deguang Liu, visiting scholar. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Filling water balloons for the Bruce Hammock Lab Water Balloon Battle are (from left) Yuan Ding, visiting graduate student; Dongyang Li, assistant project scientist; and Deguang Liu, visiting scholar. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Filling water balloons for the Bruce Hammock Lab Water Balloon Battle are (from left) Yuan Ding, visiting graduate student; Dongyang Li, assistant project scientist; and Deguang Liu, visiting scholar. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Some 2000 colorful water balloons are ready to be tossed. In the background is water warrior Lea Barnych, 4, whose mother Natalia Vasylieva is a researcher in the Bruce Hammock lab. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Some 2000 colorful water balloons are ready to be tossed. In the background is water warrior Lea Barnych, 4, whose mother Natalia Vasylieva is a researcher in the Bruce Hammock lab. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Some 2000 colorful water balloons are ready to be tossed. In the background is water warrior Lea Barnych, 4, whose mother Natalia Vasylieva is a researcher in the Bruce Hammock lab. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis distinguished professor Bruce Hammock catches a water balloon tossed at him. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
UC Davis distinguished professor Bruce Hammock catches a water balloon tossed at him. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis distinguished professor Bruce Hammock catches a water balloon tossed at him. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Splash! It was an international soakfest at the Bruce Hammock Lab Water Balloon Battle, with eight  countries represented. That's Hammock in the center getting sprayed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Splash! It was an international soakfest at the Bruce Hammock Lab Water Balloon Battle, with eight countries represented. That's Hammock in the center getting sprayed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Splash! It was an international soakfest at the Bruce Hammock Lab Water Balloon Battle, with eight countries represented. That's Hammock in the center getting sprayed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Christophe Morisseau, a researcher in the Hammock lab and coordinator of the Bruce Hammock Lab Water Balloon Battle, gets drenched. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Christophe Morisseau, a researcher in the Hammock lab and coordinator of the Bruce Hammock Lab Water Balloon Battle, gets drenched. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Christophe Morisseau, a researcher in the Hammock lab and coordinator of the Bruce Hammock Lab Water Balloon Battle, gets drenched. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Gregory Zebouni, account manager for the Hammock lab, gets drenched. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Gregory Zebouni, account manager for the Hammock lab, gets drenched. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Gregory Zebouni, account manager for the Hammock lab, gets drenched. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The water warriors pose for a group portrait following the 16th annual Bruce Hammock Lab Water Balloon Battle. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The water warriors pose for a group portrait following the 16th annual Bruce Hammock Lab Water Balloon Battle. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The water warriors pose for a group portrait following the 16th annual Bruce Hammock Lab Water Balloon Battle. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Birth Flowers

We all know about birthstones.  But for all, you trivia fans, do you know about birth flowers?  There is a flower assigned to each month, and supposedly individuals inherit the characteristics of the flower assigned to their birth month.  The birth month flowers and characteristics associated with them are as follows. 

MONTH

FLOWER

CHARACTERISTICS

January

Carnation

Love, distinction, fascination

February

Violet

Faithfulness

March

Daffodil

Spring, rebirth, happiness

April

Sweet Pea

Pleasure

May

Lily of the Valley

Sweetness, humility

June

Rose/Honeysuckle

Love, romance

July

Water lily

Joyfulness, positivity

August

Gladiolus

Moral integrity, the strength of character

September

Aster

Love, affection

October

Marigold

Devotion, comfort, healing

November

Chrysanthemum

Happiness, friendship

December

Narcissus

Hope, wealth, self-esteem

       
If you're thinking the list of birth flowers may be something put together by florists to sell flowers, you might be right.  The concept of birth flowers appears simply to have developed from the practice of gifting flowers to celebrate a birth.  The list of birth month flowers also varies slightly from one floral company to another.  For example, some florist websites list the December flower as Poinsettia, while others list Holly.  But who doesn't love receiving flowers for any reason? 

rose
rose

Posted on Monday, July 15, 2019 at 10:12 AM

Hear That Buzz? Beginning Beekeeping Courses at UC Davis!

A honey bee frame. Find the queen bee! (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Hear that buzz? If you're thinking about becoming a beekeeper but don't know how and where to begin, the University of California, Davis, is offering...

A honey bee frame. Find the queen bee! (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A honey bee frame. Find the queen bee! (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee frame. Find the queen bee! (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

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