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Posts Tagged: Gaillardia

Pollen Power Reigns Supreme

A honey bee dusted with pollen from the blanket flower, Gaillardia, in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

You may have lost track of the hours, days, weeks and months due to the coronavirus pandemic, but how can you forget National Pollinator...

A honey bee dusted with pollen from the blanket flower, Gaillardia, in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A honey bee dusted with pollen from the blanket flower, Gaillardia, in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee dusted with pollen from the blanket flower, Gaillardia, in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, June 16, 2020 at 6:03 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Economic Development, Environment, Innovation, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

Bee Inspired: It's World Bee Day!

A honey bee dusted with pollen from Gaillardia, also known as

Did you observe World Bee Day today? Every year on May 20, the United Nations asks us to think about this day, "to raise awareness of the...

A honey bee dusted with pollen from Gaillardia, also known as
A honey bee dusted with pollen from Gaillardia, also known as "the blanket flower." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee dusted with pollen from Gaillardia, also known as "the blanket flower." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Is that you in there? A honey bee looks up at the photographer as she forages on Gaillardia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Is that you in there? A honey bee looks up at the photographer as she forages on Gaillardia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Is that you in there? A honey bee looks up at the photographer as she forages on Gaillardia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, May 20, 2020 at 5:22 PM
Tags: apiculture (4), Apis mellifera (26), Gaillardia (18), honey bee (209), World Bee Day (2)
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Environment, Food, Innovation, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

Saving a Spider

A winter ant, Prenolepis imparis, encounters a Phidippus,  jumping spider in an almond tree on Bee Biology Road, UC Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

I did not save a spider yesterday. Did not save one today, either. Well, if I had seen one.... Wednesday, March 14 was "Save a Spider Day" in the...

A winter ant, Prenolepis imparis, encounters a Phidippus,  jumping spider in an almond tree on Bee Biology Road, UC Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A winter ant, Prenolepis imparis, encounters a Phidippus, jumping spider in an almond tree on Bee Biology Road, UC Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A winter ant, Prenolepis imparis, encounters a Phidippus, jumping spider in an almond tree on Bee Biology Road, UC Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A blanketflower, Gaillardia, was a perfect meeting place for this crab spider and a bee,  Halictus tripartitus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A blanketflower, Gaillardia, was a perfect meeting place for this crab spider and a bee, Halictus tripartitus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A blanketflower, Gaillardia, was a perfect meeting place for this crab spider and a bee, Halictus tripartitus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A crab spider dining on a  honey bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A crab spider dining on a honey bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A crab spider dining on a honey bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, March 15, 2018 at 5:00 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Environment, Natural Resources, Pest Management, Yard & Garden

UC Davis Arboretum Plant Sale on March 10; Why Not Think Gaillardia?

A pollen-covered honey bee  forages on a Gallardia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

If you've been thinking about blanketing your garden with blanketflower (Gaillardia), you're in luck. The UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden is...

A pollen-covered honey bee  forages on a Gallardia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A pollen-covered honey bee forages on a Gallardia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A pollen-covered honey bee forages on a Gallardia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A black-tailed bumble bee, Bombus californicus, forages on a Gaillardia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A black-tailed bumble bee, Bombus californicus, forages on a Gaillardia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A black-tailed bumble bee, Bombus californicus, forages on a Gaillardia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Gulf Fritillary butterfly,  Agraulis vanillae, flutters on a Gaillardia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A Gulf Fritillary butterfly, Agraulis vanillae, flutters on a Gaillardia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Gulf Fritillary butterfly, Agraulis vanillae, flutters on a Gaillardia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A monarch butterfly, Danaus plexippus, spreads its wings on a Gaillardia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A monarch butterfly, Danaus plexippus, spreads its wings on a Gaillardia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A monarch butterfly, Danaus plexippus, spreads its wings on a Gaillardia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A syrphid fly, also called a  hover fly or flower fly, stakes out a Gaillardia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A syrphid fly, also called a hover fly or flower fly, stakes out a Gaillardia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A syrphid fly, also called a hover fly or flower fly, stakes out a Gaillardia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Pollinators aren't the only insects that like Gaillardia. Here a praying mantis lies in wait. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Pollinators aren't the only insects that like Gaillardia. Here a praying mantis lies in wait. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Pollinators aren't the only insects that like Gaillardia. Here a praying mantis lies in wait. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, March 7, 2018 at 5:00 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Innovation, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

Let's Hear It for the Bees and Beekeepers

Two matched pairs of honey bees on a blanket flower, Gaillardia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Let's hear it for the honey bees. Right now they're scrambling to gather nectar and pollen from the blanket flower, Gaillardia. You could say...

Two matched pairs of honey bees on a blanket flower, Gaillardia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Two matched pairs of honey bees on a blanket flower, Gaillardia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Two matched pairs of honey bees on a blanket flower, Gaillardia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, November 14, 2016 at 6:49 PM

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