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Posts Tagged: Bohart Museum of Entomology

Bohart Museum of Entomology: One Busy Place!

Entomologist Norm Smith (center) answers questions about moths at the Bohart Museum of Entomology's Moth Night. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The Bohart Museum of Entomology at the University of California, Davis, is one busy place--lots of activities planned this summer and there's a newly...

Entomologist Norm Smith (center) answers questions about moths at the Bohart Museum of Entomology's Moth Night. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Entomologist Norm Smith (center) answers questions about moths at the Bohart Museum of Entomology's Moth Night. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Entomologist Norm Smith (center) answers questions about moths at the Bohart Museum of Entomology's Moth Night. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A display of moth specimens at the Bohart Museum of Entomology's 2018 Moth Night. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A display of moth specimens at the Bohart Museum of Entomology's 2018 Moth Night. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A display of moth specimens at the Bohart Museum of Entomology's 2018 Moth Night. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Jason Bond, professor of entomology and the Evert and Marion Schlinger Endowed Chair in Insect Systematics, examines a scarab beetle at the blacklighting display set up during the 2018 Moth Night. At left is
Jason Bond, professor of entomology and the Evert and Marion Schlinger Endowed Chair in Insect Systematics, examines a scarab beetle at the blacklighting display set up during the 2018 Moth Night. At left is "Moth Man" and Bohart associate John De Benedictus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Jason Bond, professor of entomology and the Evert and Marion Schlinger Endowed Chair in Insect Systematics, examines a scarab beetle at the blacklighting display set up during the 2018 Moth Night. At left is "Moth Man" and Bohart associate John De Benedictus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to Bug Land

A funny thing happened on the way to Bug Land. Well, many funny things. Lynn Kimsey, director of the Bohart Museum of Entomology and professor...


"The swarmers are attracted to lights and tend to expose themselves in the evenings." Sentence by one of Lynn Kimsey's students; illustration by UC Davis graphic artist/entomology student Karissa Merritt.

"The swarmers are attracted to lights and tend to expose themselves in the evenings." Sentence by one of Lynn Kimsey's students; illustration by UC Davis graphic artist/entomology student Karissa Merritt.


"The infected fleas can harbor rats, ground squirrels, rabbits, and occasionally, even house cats." Sentence by one of Lynn Kimsey's students; illustration by UC Davis graphic artist/entomology student Karissa Merritt.

"The infected fleas can harbor rats, ground squirrels, rabbits, and occasionally, even house cats." Sentence by one of Lynn Kimsey's students; illustration by UC Davis graphic artist/entomology student Karissa Merritt.

UC Davis/UC ANR Communicators Win ACE Awards

Bohart associate and entomology  student Wade Spencer (left) shows Chancellor Gary May and Dean Helene Dillard a stick insect from the Bohart Museum of Entomology's petting zoo. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Insects played a key role in the recent awards announced by the international Association for Communication Excellence in Agriculture, Natural...

Bohart associate and entomology  student Wade Spencer (left) shows Chancellor Gary May and Dean Helene Dillard a stick insect from the Bohart Museum of Entomology's petting zoo. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Bohart associate and entomology student Wade Spencer (left) shows Chancellor Gary May and Dean Helene Dillard a stick insect from the Bohart Museum of Entomology's petting zoo. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Bohart associate and entomology student Wade Spencer (left) shows Chancellor Gary May and Dean Helene Dillard a stick insect from the Bohart Museum of Entomology's petting zoo. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This image of a honey bee covered with mustard pollen won a silver award in the ACE competition. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
This image of a honey bee covered with mustard pollen won a silver award in the ACE competition. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This image of a honey bee covered with mustard pollen won a silver award in the ACE competition. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Birds, Bats or a Bloom? But No Splat!

A lady beetle, aka ladybug, ready to devour aphids, its primary food source. Image taken in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Remember that massive green blob that showed up Tuesday night, June 4 on the National Weather Service (NWS) radar in San Diego, and NWS tweeted it...

A lady beetle, aka ladybug, ready to devour aphids, its primary food source. Image taken in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A lady beetle, aka ladybug, ready to devour aphids, its primary food source. Image taken in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A lady beetle, aka ladybug, ready to devour aphids, its primary food source. Image taken in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A lady beetle on the prowl in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A lady beetle on the prowl in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A lady beetle on the prowl in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Peek-a-boo! A lady beetle peers over a leaf in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Peek-a-boo! A lady beetle peers over a leaf in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Peek-a-boo! A lady beetle peers over a leaf in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A congregation of overwintering lady beetles in California's Coast Range. (Photo by Greg Kareofelas)
A congregation of overwintering lady beetles in California's Coast Range. (Photo by Greg Kareofelas)

A congregation of overwintering lady beetles in California's Coast Range. (Photo by Greg Kareofelas)

European Carder Bees Do Like Snapdragons!

A male European wool carder bee patrolling snapdragons in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

What a show! Last weekend we spotted female European wool carder bees (so named because they collect or card plant hairs for their nests) buzzing in...

A male European wool carder bee patrolling snapdragons in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A male European wool carder bee patrolling snapdragons in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A male European wool carder bee patrolling snapdragons in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The European wool carder bee is about the size of a honey bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The European wool carder bee is about the size of a honey bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The European wool carder bee is about the size of a honey bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Dorsal view of the European wool carder bee as it rests on a snapdragon. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Dorsal view of the European wool carder bee as it rests on a snapdragon. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Dorsal view of the European wool carder bee as it rests on a snapdragon. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

All that patrolling makes a fellow tired. A male European wool carder bee rests on a leaf. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
All that patrolling makes a fellow tired. A male European wool carder bee rests on a leaf. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

All that patrolling makes a fellow tired. A male European wool carder bee rests on a leaf. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Bottoms up! A female wool carder bee foraging in a snapdragon. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Bottoms up! A female wool carder bee foraging in a snapdragon. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Bottoms up! A female wool carder bee foraging in a snapdragon. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, June 6, 2019 at 5:08 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment Yard & Garden

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