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Posts Tagged: Wendy Mather

Hear That Buzz? Meet the Master Beekeeper

Master Beekeeper Amy Hustead of Grass Valley, Nevada County, and a helping tending her hives.

Hear that buzz? That's an accomplishment extraordinaire. Amy Hustead of Grass Valley, a veteran beekeeper who also happens to be the first...

Master Beekeeper Amy Hustead of Grass Valley, Nevada County, and a helping tending her hives.
Master Beekeeper Amy Hustead of Grass Valley, Nevada County, and a helping tending her hives.

Master Beekeeper Amy Hustead of Grass Valley, Nevada County, and a helping tending her hives.

Amy Hustead teaching a Zoom class on Intermediate Backyard Beekeeping.(Screen shot)
Amy Hustead teaching a Zoom class on Intermediate Backyard Beekeeping.(Screen shot)

Amy Hustead teaching a Zoom class on Intermediate Backyard Beekeeping.(Screen shot)

Posted on Thursday, September 10, 2020 at 4:40 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Economic Development, Environment, Innovation, Natural Resources

Another Casualty of the Coronavirus Pandemic: California Honey Festival

Miss Honey Bee (Wendy Mather, program manager of the California Master Beekeeper Program) waves at the crowd at the 2019 California Honey Festival, while a curious youngster wonders what this is all about. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Another casualty of the coronavirus pandemic: the annual California Honey Festival, which was scheduled May 2 in historic downtown Woodland. This...

Miss Honey Bee (Wendy Mather, program manager of the California Master Beekeeper Program) waves at the crowd at the 2019 California Honey Festival, while a curious youngster wonders what this is all about. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Miss Honey Bee (Wendy Mather, program manager of the California Master Beekeeper Program) waves at the crowd at the 2019 California Honey Festival, while a curious youngster wonders what this is all about. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Miss Honey Bee (Wendy Mather, program manager of the California Master Beekeeper Program) waves at the crowd at the 2019 California Honey Festival, while a curious youngster wonders what this is all about. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Honey tasting, compliments of the UC Davis Honey and Pollination Center, is a popular activity at the California Honey Festival, but that will have to wait until next year. Third from left is Amina Harris, director of UC Davis Honey and Pollination Center. In the middle is beekeeper Sharon Schmidt. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Honey tasting, compliments of the UC Davis Honey and Pollination Center, is a popular activity at the California Honey Festival, but that will have to wait until next year. Third from left is Amina Harris, director of UC Davis Honey and Pollination Center. In the middle is beekeeper Sharon Schmidt. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Honey tasting, compliments of the UC Davis Honey and Pollination Center, is a popular activity at the California Honey Festival, but that will have to wait until next year. Third from left is Amina Harris, director of UC Davis Honey and Pollination Center. In the middle is beekeeper Sharon Schmidt. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Z Specialty Foods of Woodland kept busy at the first three California Honey Festivals. Now the company is offering honey
Z Specialty Foods of Woodland kept busy at the first three California Honey Festivals. Now the company is offering honey "care packages." The family of Amina Harris, director of the UC Davis Honey and Pollination Center, owns and operates the business. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Z Specialty Foods of Woodland kept busy at the first three California Honey Festivals. Now the company is offering honey "care packages." The family of Amina Harris, director of the UC Davis Honey and Pollination Center, owns and operates the business. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Extension apiculturist Elina Lastro Niño, shown here with a bee frame at the Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Facility, UC Davis, is a key part of the California Honey Festival. This year's event is cancelled due to the coronavirus pandemic. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Extension apiculturist Elina Lastro Niño, shown here with a bee frame at the Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Facility, UC Davis, is a key part of the California Honey Festival. This year's event is cancelled due to the coronavirus pandemic. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Extension apiculturist Elina Lastro Niño, shown here with a bee frame at the Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Facility, UC Davis, is a key part of the California Honey Festival. This year's event is cancelled due to the coronavirus pandemic. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, April 13, 2020 at 4:51 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Economic Development, Environment, Family, Food, Health, Innovation, Natural Resources, Pest Management, Yard & Garden

UC Davis Wax-Working Class Sold Out, But Another One Planned Next Spring

The wax-working glands of a honey bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

If you missed enrolling in the “Wax Working, Honey and Hive Products,” a first-of-its-kind class offered Saturday, Dec. 7 by...

The wax-working glands of a honey bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The wax-working glands of a honey bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The wax-working glands of a honey bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Reusable food wrappers--crafted with bees wax--are considered a better alternative than plastic wrap. This wrapper is the work of Teresa Hickman of Vacaville (handmadebyTeresa, Facebook page) who offers these at farmers' markets, festival and other venues in the area. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Reusable food wrappers--crafted with bees wax--are considered a better alternative than plastic wrap. This wrapper is the work of Teresa Hickman of Vacaville (handmadebyTeresa, Facebook page) who offers these at farmers' markets, festival and other venues in the area. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Reusable food wrappers--crafted with bees wax--are considered a better alternative than plastic wrap. This wrapper is the work of Teresa Hickman of Vacaville (handmadebyTeresa, Facebook page) who offers these at farmers' markets, festival and other venues in the area. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, November 22, 2019 at 4:09 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Economic Development, Innovation, Natural Resources

Waxing Poetic About Honey Bees and This Amazing UC Davis Bee Class on Wax Working

Beeswax is a natural wax produced by worker honey bees, which have eight wax-producing glands in the abdominal segments. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Do you know how honey bees, the world's most beneficial insects, produce wax? Have you ever worked with beeswax? Have you ever made candles and wax...

Beeswax is a natural wax produced by worker honey bees, which have eight wax-producing glands in the abdominal segments. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Beeswax is a natural wax produced by worker honey bees, which have eight wax-producing glands in the abdominal segments. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Beeswax is a natural wax produced by worker honey bees, which have eight wax-producing glands in the abdominal segments. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Beeswax candles are cleaner, brighter and burn longer than other candles, plus, crafters can be very creative. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Beeswax candles are cleaner, brighter and burn longer than other candles, plus, crafters can be very creative. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Beeswax candles are cleaner, brighter and burn longer than other candles, plus, crafters can be very creative. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It's a wrap! Reusable wax wrappers are used to wrap sandwiches and other foods. They are environmentally friendly, sustainable and economical. This wax wrap is the work of Vacaville artist and crafter Teresa Hickman of Vacaville (
It's a wrap! Reusable wax wrappers are used to wrap sandwiches and other foods. They are environmentally friendly, sustainable and economical. This wax wrap is the work of Vacaville artist and crafter Teresa Hickman of Vacaville ("handmadebyTeresa" on Facebook), who sells these (along with tote bags and zippered pounches) at the Davis Farmers' Markets and other venues. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It's a wrap! Reusable wax wrappers are used to wrap sandwiches and other foods. They are environmentally friendly, sustainable and economical. This wax wrap is the work of Vacaville artist and crafter Teresa Hickman of Vacaville ("handmadebyTeresa" on Facebook), who sells these (along with tote bags and zippered pounches) at the Davis Farmers' Markets and other venues. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Single plastic bags and plastic wrap are out; reusable wax wrappers are in.  They're used to wrap sandwiches and other foods. They are environmentally friendly, sustainable and economical. This wax wrap is the work of Vacaville artist and crafter Teresa Hickman of Vacaville (
Single plastic bags and plastic wrap are out; reusable wax wrappers are in. They're used to wrap sandwiches and other foods. They are environmentally friendly, sustainable and economical. This wax wrap is the work of Vacaville artist and crafter Teresa Hickman of Vacaville ("handmadebyTeresa" on Facebook), who sells these (along with tote bags and zippered pounches) at the Davis Farmers' Markets and other venues. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Single plastic bags and plastic wrap are out; reusable wax wrappers are in. They're used to wrap sandwiches and other foods. They are environmentally friendly, sustainable and economical. This wax wrap is the work of Vacaville artist and crafter Teresa Hickman of Vacaville ("handmadebyTeresa" on Facebook), who sells these (along with tote bags and zippered pounches) at the Davis Farmers' Markets and other venues. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, October 25, 2019 at 5:16 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Economic Development, Environment, Innovation, Natural Resources

Learn About Honey Bee Anatomy at UC Davis Class

The parts of a honey bee include the head, thorax and abdomen. A class on

Consider the honey bee. Like all insects, it has a head, thorax and abdomen. But are you familiar with the rest of its anatomy? Here's an...

The parts of a honey bee include the head, thorax and abdomen. A class on
The parts of a honey bee include the head, thorax and abdomen. A class on "Advanced Anatomy and Physiology of the Honey Bee" takes place Oct. 19 at UC Davis, and is offered by the UC Davis-based California Master Beekeeper Program. This image was taken in Vacaville of a bee heading toward a tower of jewels, Echium wildpretii.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The parts of a honey bee include the head, thorax and abdomen. A class on "Advanced Anatomy and Physiology of the Honey Bee" takes place Oct. 19 at UC Davis, and is offered by the UC Davis-based California Master Beekeeper Program. This image was taken in Vacaville of a bee heading toward a tower of jewels, Echium wildpretii.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, September 25, 2019 at 5:41 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Economic Development, Environment, Innovation, Natural Resources, Pest Management, Yard & Garden

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