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Posts Tagged: UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology

Mercedes Burns: Evolutionary Biology of Sex and Sexual Conflict of Harvesters

Harvesters or daddy-long legs mating. (Photo courtesy of Mercedes Burns Lab)

Evolutionary biologist Mercedes Burns of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, should draw a large crowd when she discusses her research on...

Harvesters or daddy-long legs mating. (Photo courtesy of Mercedes Burns Lab)
Harvesters or daddy-long legs mating. (Photo courtesy of Mercedes Burns Lab)

Harvesters or daddy-long legs mating. (Photo courtesy of Mercedes Burns Lab)

Harvestman collected in Japan. (Photo by Mercedes Burns)
Harvestman collected in Japan. (Photo by Mercedes Burns)

Harvestman collected in Japan. (Photo by Mercedes Burns)

Mercedes Burns on collecting trip in Japan.
Mercedes Burns on collecting trip in Japan.

Mercedes Burns on collecting trip in Japan.

UC Davis Biodiversity Museum Day: Time to Explore Diversity of Life

Owl butterfly at the Bohart Museum of Entomology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

You'll see an owl butterfly at the Bohart Museum of Entomology. You'll see a great-horned owl at the Raptor Center. "Owl that" at more at the ninth...

Missy Gable, director of the UC Master Gardener Program, shows her children Emma and Bran how to use a bee vacuum device at the Häagen-Dazs Honey Bee Haven. Missy, then Missy Borel, served as the founding manager of the haven. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Missy Gable, director of the UC Master Gardener Program, shows her children Emma and Bran how to use a bee vacuum device at the Häagen-Dazs Honey Bee Haven. Missy, then Missy Borel, served as the founding manager of the haven. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Missy Gable, director of the UC Master Gardener Program, shows her children Emma and Bran how to use a bee vacuum device at the Häagen-Dazs Honey Bee Haven. Missy, then Missy Borel, served as the founding manager of the haven. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Nematologist and doctoral student Corwin Parker examines a nematode specimen. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Nematologist and doctoral student Corwin Parker examines a nematode specimen. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Nematologist and doctoral student Corwin Parker examines a nematode specimen. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A chocolate tree? You bet! Ernesto Sandoval, collections manager at the Botanical Conservatory, checks out a cacao tree. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A chocolate tree? You bet! Ernesto Sandoval, collections manager at the Botanical Conservatory, checks out a cacao tree. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A chocolate tree? You bet! Ernesto Sandoval, collections manager at the Botanical Conservatory, checks out a cacao tree. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Andrew Young: Natural History of Syrphids, from Pollinators to Parasitoids

A syrphid, also known as a hover fly or flower fly, nectars on a tower of jewels, Echium wildpretii, in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

At first glance, they're often mistaken for bees, but bees they are not. They're flies. You've probably seen them hovering over flowers, which is...

A syrphid, also known as a hover fly or flower fly, nectars on a tower of jewels, Echium wildpretii, in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A syrphid, also known as a hover fly or flower fly, nectars on a tower of jewels, Echium wildpretii, in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A syrphid, also known as a hover fly or flower fly, nectars on a tower of jewels, Echium wildpretii, in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A syrphid in flight, heading toward a tropical milkweed, Asclepias curassavica. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A syrphid in flight, heading toward a tropical milkweed, Asclepias curassavica. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A syrphid in flight, heading toward a tropical milkweed, Asclepias curassavica. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A syrphid tucked inside the petals of a rock purslane, Calandrinia grandiflora. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A syrphid tucked inside the petals of a rock purslane, Calandrinia grandiflora. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A syrphid tucked inside the petals of a rock purslane, Calandrinia grandiflora. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A syrphid hovers over Jupiter's Beard, Centranthus ruber. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A syrphid hovers over Jupiter's Beard, Centranthus ruber. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A syrphid hovers over Jupiter's Beard, Centranthus ruber. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Geoffrey Attardo's Tiny Subjects Drawing Large-Scale Attention

This is the tsetse fly, Glossina morsitans morsitans, that Geoffrey Attardo researches in his UC Davis lab. (Photo by Geoffrey Attardo)

UC Davis medical entomologist-geneticist Geoffrey Attardo's tiny research subjects in Tupper Hall are receiving widespread attention on a very large...

This is the tsetse fly, Glossina morsitans morsitans, that Geoffrey Attardo researches in his UC Davis lab. (Photo by Geoffrey Attardo)
This is the tsetse fly, Glossina morsitans morsitans, that Geoffrey Attardo researches in his UC Davis lab. (Photo by Geoffrey Attardo)

This is the tsetse fly, Glossina morsitans morsitans, that Geoffrey Attardo researches in his UC Davis lab. (Photo by Geoffrey Attardo)

Searching the California Floristic Province for Trapdoor Spiders

A trapdoor spider, Aptostichus sp., one of the species that Jason Bond studies. (Photo by Jason Bond)

A UC Davis scientist has just received a federal grant to study trapdoor spiders in California, with opportunities for undergraduate students to...

A trapdoor spider, Aptostichus sp., one of the species that Jason Bond studies. (Photo by Jason Bond)
A trapdoor spider, Aptostichus sp., one of the species that Jason Bond studies. (Photo by Jason Bond)

A trapdoor spider, Aptostichus sp., one of the species that Jason Bond studies. (Photo by Jason Bond)

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