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Posts Tagged: Bohart Museum of Entomology

Something Wonderful Is Happening Saturday, Jan. 18 at Bohart Museum of Entomology

Zachary Griebenow, shown here at UC Davis Picnic Day, will present his research on ants at the Bohart Museum of Entomology open house. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Something Wonderful Is Happening Saturday, Jan. 18 at Bohart Museum of Entomology! If you're a student and thinking about a science career, this is...

Zachary Griebenow, shown here at UC Davis Picnic Day, will present his research on ants at the Bohart Museum of Entomology open house. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Zachary Griebenow, shown here at UC Davis Picnic Day, will present his research on ants at the Bohart Museum of Entomology open house. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Zachary Griebenow, shown here at UC Davis Picnic Day, will present his research on ants at the Bohart Museum of Entomology open house. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Forensic entomologist Alexander Dedmon is enthusiastic about his research. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Forensic entomologist Alexander Dedmon is enthusiastic about his research. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Forensic entomologist Alexander Dedmon is enthusiastic about his research. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Doctoral Yao Cai (left) (shown here with undergraduate student Christopher Ocoa, will discuss his circadian clock research on fruit flies and monarch butterflies. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Doctoral Yao Cai (left) (shown here with undergraduate student Christopher Ocoa, will discuss his circadian clock research on fruit flies and monarch butterflies. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Doctoral Yao Cai (left) (shown here with undergraduate student Christopher Ocoa, will discuss his circadian clock research on fruit flies and monarch butterflies. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Charlotte Alberts studies assassin flies and also draws them! This is an Ommatius amula with prey.
Charlotte Alberts studies assassin flies and also draws them! This is an Ommatius amula with prey.

Charlotte Alberts studies assassin flies and also draws them! This is an Ommatius amula with prey.

Forest entomologist Crystal Homicz will talk about bark beetles. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Forest entomologist Crystal Homicz will talk about bark beetles. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Forest entomologist Crystal Homicz will talk about bark beetles. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Bohart Museum Open House: What Insects Do Bats Eat?

Mexican free-tailed bats leaving Yolo Causeway at dusk on Sept. 10, 2019. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

When you watch bats emerge at dusk in the summer from the Yolo Causeway, have you ever wondered what insects they eat? UC Davis doctoral candidate...

Mexican free-tailed bats leaving Yolo Causeway at dusk on Sept. 10, 2019. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Mexican free-tailed bats leaving Yolo Causeway at dusk on Sept. 10, 2019. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Mexican free-tailed batsleaving Yolo Causeway at dusk on Sept. 10, 2019. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Mexican free-tailed bats ready to catch insects at the Yolo Causeway. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Mexican free-tailed bats ready to catch insects at the Yolo Causeway. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Mexican free-tailed bats ready to catch insects at the Yolo Causeway. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Thousands of bats nest in the Yolo Causeway during the summer. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Thousands of bats nest in the Yolo Causeway during the summer. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Thousands of bats nest in the Yolo Causeway during the summer. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This is an image of a bat that Ann Holmes studies. (Photo by Shayan Kaveh)
This is an image of a bat that Ann Holmes studies. (Photo by Shayan Kaveh)

This is an image of a bat that Ann Holmes studies. (Photo by Shayan Kaveh)

Those Incredible Digger Bees and Their Nest Parasites

Leslie Saul-Gershenz (left) and curator Emma Cluff stand by their display at the Bohart Museum of Entomology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

If you want to learn about digger bees and the exciting research that UC Davis evolutionary ecologist Leslie Saul-Gershenz is pursuing, check out the...

Leslie Saul-Gershenz (left) and curator Emma Cluff stand by their display at the Bohart Museum of Entomology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Leslie Saul-Gershenz (left) and curator Emma Cluff stand by their display at the Bohart Museum of Entomology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Leslie Saul-Gershenz (left) and curator Emma Cluff stand by their display at the Bohart Museum of Entomology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A digger bee, Habropoda pallida, with blister bee larvae. (Photo by Leslie Saul-Gershenz)
A digger bee, Habropoda pallida, with blister bee larvae. (Photo by Leslie Saul-Gershenz)

A digger bee, Habropoda pallida, with blister bee larvae. (Photo by Leslie Saul-Gershenz)

Posted on Friday, December 27, 2019 at 10:41 PM

Why Our Car Is Chortling 'Merry Chrysalis'

A Gulf Fritillary chrysalis inside the author's car, by the rear window. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Our compact car gathers no reindeer antlers, no Rudoph nose, no Santa hat. Zero, zip, zilch, nada. Our HOUSE exudes “Merry Christmas!”...

A Gulf Fritillary chrysalis inside the author's car, by the rear window. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A Gulf Fritillary chrysalis inside the author's car, by the rear window. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Gulf Fritillary chrysalis inside the author's car, by the rear window. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This is what a normal eclosure looks like: a Gulf Fritillary has just eclosed in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
This is what a normal eclosure looks like: a Gulf Fritillary has just eclosed in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This is what a normal eclosure looks like: a Gulf Fritillary has just eclosed in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The Gulf Fritillary is a reddish-orange butterfly with silver-spangled underwings. This one is on a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia)in the summer. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The Gulf Fritillary is a reddish-orange butterfly with silver-spangled underwings. This one is on a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia)in the summer. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The Gulf Fritillary is a reddish-orange butterfly with silver-spangled underwings. This one is on a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia)in the summer. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Gulf Fritillary spreads its wings in the summer. It's nectaring on a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia) in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A Gulf Fritillary spreads its wings in the summer. It's nectaring on a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia) in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Gulf Fritillary spreads its wings in the summer. It's nectaring on a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia) in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, December 24, 2019 at 3:41 PM

Seeing Spots at the Bohart Museum of Entomology

The Indian domino cockroach is part of the live

When you visit the Bohart Museum of Entomology on the UC Davis campus, you're likely to see spots. That would be the Indian domino cockroach, Therea...

The Indian domino cockroach is part of the live
The Indian domino cockroach is part of the live "petting zoo" at the Bohart Museum of Entomology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The Indian domino cockroach is part of the live "petting zoo" at the Bohart Museum of Entomology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, December 13, 2019 at 5:24 PM

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