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Posts Tagged: UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology

Of French Fries, Couch Potatoes and Root-Knot Nematodes

UC Davis nematologist Shahid Siddique. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

When you think of potatoes, your thoughts probably turn to baked potatoes, French fries, the "one-potato-two-potato" game, or "couch potatoes"...

UC Davis nematologist Shahid Siddique. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
UC Davis nematologist Shahid Siddique. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis nematologist Shahid Siddique. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ivana Li: 'The Miracle Worker'

UC Davis biology lab manager Ivana Li discusses ocean life at the 2019 UC Davis Biodiversity Museum Day. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

You could call Ivana Li "the miracle worker." You could call Ivana Li "entomologist, biology lab manager, artist and chef...

UC Davis biology lab manager Ivana Li discusses ocean life at the 2019 UC Davis Biodiversity Museum Day. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
UC Davis biology lab manager Ivana Li discusses ocean life at the 2019 UC Davis Biodiversity Museum Day. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis biology lab manager Ivana Li discusses ocean life at the 2019 UC Davis Biodiversity Museum Day. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ivana Li excels as a chef--as she does as a scientist and artist. (Photo by. Deirdre Li)
Ivana Li excels as a chef--as she does as a scientist and artist. (Photo by. Deirdre Li)

Ivana Li excels as a chef--as she does as a scientist and artist. (Photo by. Deirdre Li)

Food for Thought: And Now It's Time for Action! Teachers...Join In!

Food ought to be incorporated in every school curriculum, says Christian Nansen. Here his former students at the University of Western Australia, Preth, learn about designing and installing a garden. (Photo by Christian Nansen)

An excellent idea.  Food ought to be incorporated as an integral part of our school curricula, says UC Davis agricultural...

Food ought to be incorporated in every school curriculum, says Christian Nansen. Here his former students at the University of Western Australia, Preth, learn about designing and installing a garden. (Photo by Christian Nansen)
Food ought to be incorporated in every school curriculum, says Christian Nansen. Here his former students at the University of Western Australia, Preth, learn about designing and installing a garden. (Photo by Christian Nansen)

Food ought to be incorporated in every school curriculum, says Christian Nansen. Here his former students at the University of Western Australia, Preth, learn about designing and installing a garden. (Photo by Christian Nansen)

As part of a parental assignment, 11-year-old Molly Nansen of Davis calculated
As part of a parental assignment, 11-year-old Molly Nansen of Davis calculated "How much cabbage would be needed to meet the Vitamin K requirements for her entire class for a whole year?" (Photo by Christian Nansen)

As part of a parental assignment, 11-year-old Molly Nansen of Davis calculated "How much cabbage would be needed to meet the Vitamin K requirements for her entire class for a whole year?" (Photo by Christian Nansen)

Molly Nansen with the muffin recipe she created, using cabbage. (Photo by Christian Nansen)
Molly Nansen with the muffin recipe she created, using cabbage. (Photo by Christian Nansen)

Molly Nansen with the muffin recipe she created, using cabbage. (Photo by Christian Nansen)

Name That Spider--And Did They Ever!

This is male of the species of a new genus of trapdoor spiders that UC Davis professor Jason Bond discovered in Monterey County. Bond proposes to name the genus, Cryptocteniza, part of which means “hidden or secret.” (Image by Jason Bond)

When UC Davis Professor Jason Bond  discovered a new genus of trapdoor spiders in Monterey County and issued a call for folks to name...

This is male of the species of a new genus of trapdoor spiders that UC Davis professor Jason Bond discovered in Monterey County. Bond proposes to name the genus, Cryptocteniza, part of which means “hidden or secret.” (Image by Jason Bond)
This is male of the species of a new genus of trapdoor spiders that UC Davis professor Jason Bond discovered in Monterey County. Bond proposes to name the genus, Cryptocteniza, part of which means “hidden or secret.” (Image by Jason Bond)

This is male of the species of a new genus of trapdoor spiders that UC Davis professor Jason Bond discovered in Monterey County. Bond proposes to name the genus, Cryptocteniza, part of which means “hidden or secret.” (Image by Jason Bond)

This is where UC Davis professor Jason Bond discovered a new genus of trapdoor spiders. (Illustrations by Jason Bond)
This is where UC Davis professor Jason Bond discovered a new genus of trapdoor spiders. (Illustrations by Jason Bond)

This is where UC Davis professor Jason Bond discovered a new genus of trapdoor spiders. (Illustrations by Jason Bond)

Growing Interest in Bee Sting Therapy Research as a Possible COVID-19 Treatment?

Former professional bee wrangler Norm Gary getting ready for a documentary in 2010. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

"Honey bee venom treatment may become a new tool in the search for new ways to prevent infection with COVID-19," says Norman Gary, emeritus professor...

Former professional bee wrangler Norm Gary getting ready for a documentary in 2010. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Former professional bee wrangler Norm Gary getting ready for a documentary in 2010. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Former professional bee wrangler Norm Gary getting ready for a documentary in 2010. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This is the sign in front of the Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Facility on Bee Biology Road, UC Davis. It once doubled as a bee hive; Laidlaw treated his arthritis with some of the bee venom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
This is the sign in front of the Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Facility on Bee Biology Road, UC Davis. It once doubled as a bee hive; Laidlaw treated his arthritis with some of the bee venom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This is the sign in front of the Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Facility on Bee Biology Road, UC Davis. It once doubled as a bee hive; Laidlaw treated his arthritis with some of the bee venom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

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