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Bohart Museum Open House on Oct 19: Fright or Delight?

Bohart Museum senior museum scientist Steve Heydon with his Pteromalids or jewel wasps. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It won't be a Fright Night or a Delight Night. After all, it's in the afternoon. But the Bohart Museum of Entomology open house on "Parasitoid...

Bohart Museum senior museum scientist Steve Heydon with his Pteromalids or jewel wasps. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Bohart Museum senior museum scientist Steve Heydon with his Pteromalids or jewel wasps. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Bohart Museum senior museum scientist Steve Heydon with his Pteromalids or jewel wasps. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The spotted cucumber beetle is a pest of pumpkins and other members of the cucurbits family. Here it's attacked by an assassin bug. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The spotted cucumber beetle is a pest of pumpkins and other members of the cucurbits family. Here it's attacked by an assassin bug. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The spotted cucumber beetle is a pest of pumpkins and other members of the cucurbits family. Here it's attacked by an assassin bug. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, October 15, 2019 at 4:20 PM

The Book Corner

NATURE'S PALETTE: The Science of Plant Color

By: David Lee

 

I had just finished seeing the most delicious 18th art exhibit at the Norton Simon Museum in LA when I wandered into the museum shop.  There, a curious book—for an art museum anyway—caught my eye…Nature's Palette: The Science of Plant Color by David Lee.  To my way of thinking, the only relation to art is the notion of color in nature.  Of course, now I became really curious.  15 minutes later, after being entirely fascinated, I decided to buy the book, take it home and become immersed in the wonderful world of nature's color.

The author, David Lee is a professor of Biological Science at Florida International University as well as Director of The Kampog of the National Tropical Botanical Garden in Miami, FL.  So, he comes with his own curiosity about what colors do for the growth of plants…and why they are swirling all about us.  After he presents the basic courses in molecular chemistry, biology and optic operations, (yes, get over it and read it so you can enjoy the rest of the book!)—he's really off and running with a passion.

The chapter heads give some indication of the focus and diversity of the book with such topics as “Coloring Our Bodies With Plants; Light, Vision & Color; Leaves; Flowers; Stems & Roots; and Chlorophilia.  It's in this final chapter, that he returns to his vision of a color-filled world swirling around all-around in nature—the very notion that started his journey.

Lee begins his book as a bit of an anthropologist—leading us all the way back to the times of Shanidar Neanderthal and King Tut and the influences of plants in early ceremonial lives.  He demonstrates how plants and their colors have been used in commerce and trade since earliest times—from dyes and décor to today's cosmetics.

Much of Lee's scientific explorations lead him, as the Guardian states, “to describe the process as zillions of minute brews of organic dyes allowing preferred wavelengths to pass through them, strike the plant tissues, and be scattered and reflected back as colors.”  In layman's terms, Lee compares the process to watercolor painting.  What an elegant way to view a very complex but exquisite natural process.

Posted on Tuesday, October 15, 2019 at 3:48 PM

Rebecca Irwin: Role of Floral Traits in Pollination and Bee Disease Transmission

What's in store for this honey bee? It is heading for an  Anisodontea sp.'Strybing Beauty.' Image taken in pollinator garden in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

You've seen honey bees buzzing past you to reach a good nectar or pollen source. But there's much more to it than that. What's in that floral nectar...

What's in store for this honey bee? It is heading for an  Anisodontea sp.'Strybing Beauty.' Image taken in pollinator garden in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
What's in store for this honey bee? It is heading for an Anisodontea sp.'Strybing Beauty.' Image taken in pollinator garden in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

What's in store for this honey bee? It is heading for an Anisodontea sp.'Strybing Beauty.' Image taken in pollinator garden in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Marketing Livestock and Other Ranch Products - Nov 20

FiestaFarm

Are you looking for new ways to market your livestock or other products from your ranch? Join us on November 20 from 8:30 am to 3:30 pm at Elkhorn...

Posted on Monday, October 14, 2019 at 10:28 AM

Parasitoid Palooza at Bohart Museum Open House

Just in time for Halloween! The orange and black Harlequin beetles will be displayed at the Bohart Museum of Entomology open house on Oct. 19. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Mark your calendars for a "parade of parasitoids!" The Bohart Museum of Entomology at the University of California, Davis, is sponsoring its annual...

Just in time for Halloween! The orange and black Harlequin beetles will be displayed at the Bohart Museum of Entomology open house on Oct. 19. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Just in time for Halloween! The orange and black Harlequin beetles will be displayed at the Bohart Museum of Entomology open house on Oct. 19. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Just in time for Halloween! The orange and black Harlequin beetles will be displayed at the Bohart Museum of Entomology open house on Oct. 19. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

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