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A Monarch Named Ruth

The Egg: Greg Kareofelas collected this egg from a narrowleaf milkweed in his Davis yard on Aug. 25. (Photo by Greg Kareofelas)

When a monarch butterfly fluttered into the Davis garden of naturalist Greg Kareofelas and laid an egg on his narrowleaf milkweed, it marked the...

The Egg: Greg Kareofelas collected this egg from a narrowleaf milkweed in his Davis yard on Aug. 25. (Photo by Greg Kareofelas)
The Egg: Greg Kareofelas collected this egg from a narrowleaf milkweed in his Davis yard on Aug. 25. (Photo by Greg Kareofelas)

The Egg: Greg Kareofelas collected this egg from a narrowleaf milkweed in his Davis yard on Aug. 25. (Photo by Greg Kareofelas)

The Caterpillar: The egg that Greg Kareofelas collected Aug. 25 became a larva or caterpillar 3.5 days later. (Photo by Greg Kareofelas)
The Caterpillar: The egg that Greg Kareofelas collected Aug. 25 became a larva or caterpillar 3.5 days later. (Photo by Greg Kareofelas)

The Caterpillar: The egg that Greg Kareofelas collected Aug. 25 became a larva or caterpillar 3.5 days later. (Photo by Greg Kareofelas)

The Chrysalis: The caterpillar formed a chrysalis 12.5 days later. (Photo by Greg Kareofelas)
The Chrysalis: The caterpillar formed a chrysalis 12.5 days later. (Photo by Greg Kareofelas)

The Chrysalis: The caterpillar formed a chrysalis 12.5 days later. (Photo by Greg Kareofelas)

The Adult: The monarch eclosed  only 8.5 days after forming the chrysalis and is shown here drying its wings. (Photo by Greg Kareofelas)
The Adult: The monarch eclosed only 8.5 days after forming the chrysalis and is shown here drying its wings. (Photo by Greg Kareofelas)

The Adult: The monarch eclosed only 8.5 days after forming the chrysalis and is shown here drying its wings. (Photo by Greg Kareofelas)

Meet Ruth: The monarch, a female, spreads her wings. Greg named her
Meet Ruth: The monarch, a female, spreads her wings. Greg named her "Ruth," after Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, a champion of gender equality and women's rights. (Photo by Greg Kareofelas)

Meet Ruth: The monarch, a female, spreads her wings. Greg named her "Ruth," after Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, a champion of gender equality and women's rights. (Photo by Greg Kareofelas)

Posted on Monday, September 21, 2020 at 4:24 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

The Honey Bee and the Praying Mantis

A honey bee nectaring on African blue basil blossoms is unaware that on the other side, camouflaged and hidden in the shadows, is a praying mantis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

So I'm a praying mantis and being a top-notch real estate developer, I've located the best place in the pollinator garden. I have acquired the proper...

A honey bee nectaring on African blue basil blossoms is unaware that on the other side, camouflaged and hidden in the shadows, is a praying mantis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A honey bee nectaring on African blue basil blossoms is unaware that on the other side, camouflaged and hidden in the shadows, is a praying mantis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee nectaring on African blue basil blossoms is unaware that on the other side, camouflaged and hidden in the shadows, is a praying mantis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The honey bee, intent on gathering nectar, doesn't notice a praying mantis in her flight zone. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The honey bee, intent on gathering nectar, doesn't notice a praying mantis in her flight zone. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The honey bee, intent on gathering nectar, doesn't notice a praying mantis in her flight zone. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)


"Oops, what's that blocking my path?" the bee says. "Look at those spiked forelegs. This might not end well." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

"Oops, what's that blocking my path?" the bee says. "Look at those spiked forelegs. This might not end well." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This honey bee survives to visit the African blue basil patch another day. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
This honey bee survives to visit the African blue basil patch another day. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This honey bee survives to visit the African blue basil patch another day. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)


"Oh, well, I forgot to pray before breakfast." The praying mantis assumes its position. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

"Oh, well, I forgot to pray before breakfast." The praying mantis assumes its position. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, September 18, 2020 at 5:29 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Food, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

Central Coast Rangeland Research Updates - Workshop on September 29 from 4-5 pm

UCCE San Luis Obispo County is hosting a one-hour Zoom workshop covering the following topics: Forage Production and Nutrient Quality Trace...

Posted on Friday, September 18, 2020 at 12:01 PM

2020 Forage Production in San Benito County

Table

This is a summary of forage production clipping from 2020. I was able to clip forage production at two sites in San Benito County: one in Rainfall...

Posted on Thursday, September 17, 2020 at 4:27 PM

The Beauty of the Bee

A honey bee nectaring on African blue basil in Vacaville, Calif. At right is Salvia microphylla

Have you ever pulled up a chair in your garden and watched honey bees foraging? They are so intent on their "bees-ness" that they don't know you're...

A honey bee nectaring on African blue basil in Vacaville, Calif. At right is Salvia microphylla
A honey bee nectaring on African blue basil in Vacaville, Calif. At right is Salvia microphylla "Hot Lips." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee nectaring on African blue basil in Vacaville, Calif. At right is Salvia microphylla "Hot Lips." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The honey bee, its tongue or proboscis still extended, departs from the African blue basil.  (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The honey bee, its tongue or proboscis still extended, departs from the African blue basil. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The honey bee, its tongue or proboscis still extended, departs from the African blue basil. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The honey bee pulls its proboscis back in and is leaving the African blue basil. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The honey bee pulls its proboscis back in and is leaving the African blue basil. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The honey bee pulls its proboscis back in and is leaving the African blue basil. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Frozen in time--a honey bee takes flight and heads for home. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Frozen in time--a honey bee takes flight and heads for home. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Frozen in time--a honey bee takes flight and heads for home. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, September 17, 2020 at 4:26 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Economic Development, Environment, Food, Innovation, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

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